Leukaemia student remembered by widow

first_imgA Brasenose student has died from leukaemia the day after marrying his university sweetheart.Matt Carver, aged 22, passed away just hours after tying the knot with Nicola Godfrey, his 21-year-old fiancée from New College.The couple had planned to get married in two years’ time, but decided to bring the ceremony forward when doctors told them that history student Matt had only weeks to live.Matt had proposed to Nicola just two months beforehand in December last year. Their plans were shattered however when Matt was suddenly taken ill weeks into their new term at Oxford University.Weighed down by his academic career, as well an array of extra-curricular pursuits and job applications, neither Matt nor his wife-to-be had given much thought to the severe bouts of tiredness he had been experiencing.However, when the young fiancé suffered a small cut on his finger that wouldn’t stop bleeding that the pair decided he should visit his GP. Later that day however, following several blood tests, doctors had to break the news to Matt that he had contracted the blood cancer leukemia.Matt was determined to fight the illness, but after three courses of debilitating chemotherapy he developed a facial paralysis – an indication the disease had reached his brain.With signs that they might not have much longer together, the young couple rushed their wedding forward so that they would still be able to enjoy some time together as husband and wife.After a ceremony surrounded by family and friends at Brasenose College chapel, the wedding party had dinner at Oxford’s Old Bank Hotel. Yet the following morning, Matt began complaining of a headache and he was rushed to the John Radcliffe Hospital.Realising his condition, the registrar who had been handling his treatment ordered staff to remove all drips and other equipment from Matt and to move him into to a private room. Later that afternoon, with his wife and their immediate families by his side, he died. Mathematics student Nicola Carver later paid tribute to the bravery that her husband had shown following the last fatal diagnosis.“They told us that it was going to be weeks, possibly months,” said Nicola. “It was a massive shock but we could plan things and do things which we had put on hold when he was initially diagnosed.”“I will never, ever forget how brave he was.“Matt was the kind of person who put his heart and soul into everything he did.“He was a fantastic man and I will miss him very much. Even when he was ill he still managed to make everybody laugh.”Mrs Carver added that she took some comfort from the two of them being able to make the commitment to each other before he died.“It was a true celebration of our love and was everything that we had dreamed of since we decided to get married,” she said.“Matt was desperate to get married and it was such a relief to get through the day and become his wife but obviously we would have wanted more time together.“He looked fantastic, dressed up to the nines in his top hat and tails.“I’m told by his dad that when he was waiting for me to come in he kept on asking: ‘What time is it? What time is it now?’“He was just like any other groom.”Showing her own determination and courage, Nicola said that she intends to return to Oxford to complete her degree this Michaelmas term.She said: “I have lots of friends who are still there and who are going to take care of me.“I have to at least try. If I don’t go back now, then I’ll never go back.”She and Matt – both passionate musicians – had first met on a University wind orchestra trip to St Tropez in 2006.Brasenose College, where Matt had been studying medieval history, lowered its flag to half mast in recognition of its loss, following his death earlier this summer. More than 500 mourners packed his hometown funeral 11 days after his death to say their last goodbyes.The student, from Newport, South Wales, had been an active member of the college, representing the them in rowing, cricket and football before he was struck down by illness.Chaplain the Reverend Graeme Richardson particularly paid tribute to him, saying: “He was an outstanding all-round student, who was involved in many aspects of the college.”Matt and Nicola’s families have since launched campaigns to raise money for two specialist cancer charities – the Anthony Nolan Trust and Leukaemia Research. They are urging people between 18 and 40 to join the bone marrow register. For more details or to make a donation please contact the trust on 0901 882 2234 or visit www.anthonynolan.org.uk.last_img read more

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Sample Street closed on South Bend’s west side due to fire

first_img (Photo supplied/ABC 57) A large fire resulted in the closure of Sample Street on the west side of South Bend.The blaze was reported around 4 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 4, in the 2200 block of Sample Street.Emergency crews blocked traffic between Olive and Walnut Streets while smoke from the fire wafted high into the sky.More than a dozen fire truck responded and remained on scene for several hours dousing the blaze.There was no report of any injuries. There was no immediate word about the cause of the fire.Here is a picture from the scene. Again, please avoid Sample Street between Olive and Walnut.Fire crews are battling a commercial fire right now. @SouthBendFire pic.twitter.com/WdMxygYTV2— South Bend Police (@southbendpolice) December 4, 2020 Sample Street closed on South Bend’s west side due to fire Previous articleEtna Green Man Facing Molesting ChargesNext articleMan who allegedly fired shots at officers charged with attempted murder Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. WhatsApp By Jon Zimney – December 4, 2020 0 780 Google+ Pinterest Pinterest WhatsApp Twitter Facebook Twitter IndianaLocalNews Facebook Google+last_img read more

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Willie Nelson Is “Feeling Great” And Will Resume Touring, According To Son Lukas

first_imgFans of Willie Nelson have certainly had reason to worry lately, as the famed folk singer has been forced to cancel a number of tour dates due to illness. We’re happy to report that Nelson, who turns 84 at the end of April, is apparently in good health and will be resuming his touring plans in the coming days.The news comes by way of Nelson’s son, Lukas Nelson, who posted the following message earlier today:Willie Nelson has been an inspiration to so many, and we’re beyond happy to hear that he’s doing well. See you out there, Willie!last_img read more

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$100,000 more for Allston-Brighton

first_imgThe Harvard Allston Skating Rink, a former car dealership turned temporary ice rink on Western Avenue, was buzzing Friday evening (Feb. 26), as Harvard President Drew Faust, Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino, and a crowd of more than 150 gathered to celebrate another $100,000 in Harvard grants for local nonprofit groups.It was the award ceremony for the second round of  grants from the Harvard Allston Partnership Fund, a University-city-community collaboration that has infused about $200,000 over the past two years into 14 organizations that serve the Allston-Brighton community.Menino and Faust took turns at the podium in front of the standing-room-only crowd in the community room, as die-hard local skaters took advantage of the free ice rink in the garage.“Without the availability of these resources, these programs would not be able to fulfill their missions during these difficult economic times,” said Menino, who underscored the important work each organization does.  “With Harvard’s assistance, we’re able to continue great programming that nurtures kids and keeps them busy, just like this skating rink.” In introducing Faust, Menino thanked her for being so available to Boston and Allston.“Supporting local organizations that have an immediate and lasting impact on families in Allston-Brighton is just one way Harvard is actively engaged in the community,” said Faust. “We are committed to these important neighborhood partnerships, and to working together to enhance the quality of life for residents.”Menino and Faust took turns reading the names and activities of the organizations receiving Harvard Allston Partnership Fund (HAPF) grants.  Recipients included the Gardner Pilot Academy (GPA), Allston Brighton Youth Hockey, the Family Nurturing Center of Massachusetts, the Friends of the Honan-Allston Library, the Brighton-Allston Historical Society and Heritage Museum, the Big Sister Association of Greater Boston, the Fishing Academy, the West End House Boys Camp, and the West End House Girls Camp. The grants will help local nonprofits to provide Allston-Brighton children and families with a range of programs and services, including after-school, summer enrichment, and mentoring experiences for young people; computer training and parenting classes for adults; “Learn to Skate” lessons for youth hockey players; and initiatives that celebrate the rich history of the neighborhood.“Whether it’s giving every child who wants to the opportunity to skate for free or hop in a boat and learn to fish, these programs are opening up opportunities for our children and keeping them safe,” said John Bruno, a member of the resident-based Harvard Allston Partnership Fund board. “These grants are directly beneficial and provide a link between Harvard and the community that’s tangible and really makes a difference.”The $500,000 Harvard Allston Partnership Fund was created in 2008 by Harvard University and the City of Boston, in collaboration with the Allston community, to support neighborhood improvement projects, cultural enrichment, and educational programming. To date, the $200,000 in grants has assisted 14 community organizations in beautifying the neighborhood, expanding existing community programs, and helping to broaden access to those programs through community-based scholarships. Last year, the grants also helped to launch a new community organization, the Allston Brighton Arts Bridge.“It’s a real struggle in a downturn economy to sustain our program model of serving the whole child, which includes academic enrichment and social support for children and their families,” said Lauren Fogarty, director of Extended Learning Time at the Gardner Pilot Academy, which received funding this winter. “Taking any of the pieces we offer away will keep us from reaching our mission, and these grants will make a huge difference to sustain the programs, as well as close opportunity gaps for North Allston-North Brighton students.”last_img read more

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Houses Today

first_imgHouse Masters and former students discuss learning outside the classroom and how the housing system enriches life and community at Harvard.last_img

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Harvard starts mRNA immunotherapy research collaboration with Moderna

first_imgHarvard University has established a multi-year research collaboration with the biotech company Moderna, Inc., with the goal of identifying and developing novel therapeutic approaches that could improve the lives of patients with immunological diseases. Additional funding from Moderna to Harvard Medical School (HMS) will establish an initiative at HMS called the Alliance for RNA Therapies for the Modulation of the Immune System (ARTiMIS), which will enable basic science research in the field of immunology using Moderna’s mRNA and nanoparticle delivery technology. The HMS Department of Immunology is hosted a symposium with Moderna to launch the ARTiMIS initiative last week.“Between the ARTiMIS initiative and the broader research collaboration between Moderna and Harvard, we have established a collaborative framework to support continuous innovation in immunology,” said Isaac Kohlberg, Harvard’s chief technology development officer and senior associate provost. “This access to focused funding and technical resources will enable Harvard researchers to make impactful advances in biomedical science, from the generation of basic biological insights to, we hope, the preclinical development of new immunotherapies.”ARTiMIS to support research through grants, materialsThe ARTiMIS initiative will enable HMS-affiliated investigators to access Moderna’s platform for mRNA and novel immune delivery and will provide financial support for exploratory research projects, including the work of postdoctoral researchers at HMS. Moderna has provided the initial funding for ARTiMIS through a $1.2 million grant and will also provide investigators with mRNA and nanoparticle delivery technology and materials. Projects selected for funding by ARTiMIS will aim to advance basic understandings of fundamental immunological processes, generate new mechanistic insights in the pathogenesis of immunological diseases and discover novel approaches to the prevention, diagnosis and therapy of human diseases.“ARTiMIS provides an exciting opportunity for the HMS Immunology community to utilize Moderna’s mRNA and delivery technology to advance the field of immunology, toward our shared goal of serving patients,” said Arlene Sharpe, chair of the department of immunology and co-director of the Evergrande Center for Immunologic Diseases at Harvard Medical School. “By combining the talents of leading immunologists at Harvard with this innovative technology, we hope to enable new discoveries in multiple areas of immunology.”Research collaboration to facilitate further discovery and developmentTo further advance insights toward therapeutics, Moderna has also entered into a multi-year research agreement with the university at large, through the Harvard Office of Technology Development. Under this collaboration framework, Moderna will initially provide sponsored research funding of up to $2.45 million in support of a project led by Ulrich von Andrian, the Edward Mallinckrodt Jr. Professor of Immunopathology and Director of the Center for Immune Imaging at HMS. This project aims to use mRNA technologies to study and manipulate the migration of immune cells from blood to tissues. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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DSLC closes with women’s activist

To conclude the Saint Mary’s Diverse Leadership Conference (DSLC) on March 21, Zainab Salbi, co-founder of the non-profit organization Women for Women, addressed the Saint Mary’s community about her experience as an advocate for women’s rights in the war-torn Middle East. “Twenty years ago I embarked on a journey,” Salbi said. “I knew I would dedicate my life to changing the world, and I knew I would change the lives of women. Along my journey I learned many important lessons that have allowed me to not only help others but also help myself.” Speaking in Carroll Auditorium on Wednesday evening, Salbi said women should band together to encourage new ideas and should never degrade the opinions of their peers. “It is time for women to unite,” she said. “It is time for women to echo each other and roar in one voice. Women must have the audacity to be pro-active with articulating what we want and how we want to be defined in this world.” Women must respect each other to truly effect change, Salbi said. “If I have any judgment of a woman inside the silence of my heart she will feel it and it will affect her,” she said. “The most important thing we can give a vulnerable woman is respect.” Salbi said her journey to end injustice included embracing herself for who she is. “Going to different war zones was not the hardest journey for me,” Salbi said. “My hardest journey was to save myself and find the peace within my own heart.” She said she always advised other women to share their stories, but was hesitant to talk about her own. “For many years I encouraged other women to speak out and tell their true stories and hardships,” Salbi said. “It was easy for me to tell other women’s stories, but not my own.” With some encouragement from her publisher and women she interviewed from war-torn areas, Salbi said she chose to share her story with the world. “I felt as though I had too much honor and pride to say that I had been raped and was in an arranged marriage, but once I came clean and told the world, I felt as though a burden was lifted off of me,” she said. “I learned it is our individual responsibility to break the silence.” Salbi said sharing her story was a part of her healing process, but to truly heal, she had to change her cynical perception of men. “There are really good men out there in the world,” she said. “We must not corner men. We must collaborate with them. We have to reach and work alongside men or there will be no transformation.” Salbi said women’s activists should make an effort to spread joy through their work. “It is our presence that is part of our work,” she said. “We must work to transform the world with joy. We must smile. We must dance. Dance when you have torn the bandage off. Dance in the middle of the battlefield. Dance in your blood. Dance and be free with joy.” College president Carol Mooney said Salbi’s lessons encapsulate the true essence of a Saint Mary’s education, and these lessons will have a lasting impact on members of the audience. “She did a remarkable thing tonight,” Mooney said. “She bore her soul in public, in a way that has the power to move other people. I believe she will leave a lasting impact on anyone that spends just one hour with her.” To end her talk, Salbi encouraged members of the audience to start their own life journey. “As you embark on your journey I encourage you to tell, live and be your truth,” Salbi said. “Telling your own truth is not an easy journey, but let me tell you it is worth it. Do it now. Jump off a cliff and live your truth right now. Don’t wait.” read more

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Champlain College student supports Lt. Governor’s mission to Cuba

first_imgDennis O’Connell of North Pomfret, Vt., an International Business student at Champlain College in Burlington, conducted economic and cultural research for Lt. Governor Brian Dubie’s mission to Cuba this week. O’Connell prepared briefing packages to help prepare Dubie and other officials for the international trip.Dubie was invited by Alimport, a Cuban government-authorized trade group, to attend a Cuban-US agricultural trade fair from April 13 – 16. He was scheduled to address the conference on the opening day. The Cuban Humanitarian Trade Act of 2001 authorizes certain sales of US agricultural and medical products to Cuba, and Cuba has released an extensive list of commodities it is interested in buying. Among them are dairy products, maple products and apples.Dubie said, “Our goals for this trip are to establish a relationship between the people of Vermont and the people of Cuba. We hope to do that by building a framework for educational exchange, by exploring opportunities to export Vermont products for the Cuban people, and by promoting peace and dialogue between our countries.”In a press conference last week, Dubie thanked the Champlain College student for providing briefing materials on current conditions in Cuba in preparation for the trip.Dennis is the son of Dennis and Rosi O’Connell of North Pomfret, Vt., and he is a graduate of Woodstock Union High School.last_img read more

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Dear Meredith, . . .

first_imgClick here to subscribe to the Pharr Out BlogDear Meredith,You don’t know who I am, but you have deeply impacted my life. I wish we could have had the opportunity to meet; I think we would have been great friends.When I began to learn about you this winter, I was amazed at how much we have in common. Reading about your life and interests I felt like I was looking at a biography of my own life. We are the same age and we are both lucky enough to call the Southeast home. We both love animals, literature, wine, and spending time with our friends. You and I have both spent time volunteering with children and we both share a strong faith and value system. But most of all, I know that you love the outdoors – you feel free and safe in the outdoors – and so do I.That’s why I was ripped apart this January when reading accounts, first of your disappearance and then of your death on Blood Mountain, Georgia.How could something so tragic happen to someone so beautiful and full of life? You had your whole life in front of you and it was selfishly and carelessly ripped away. And one of the most unsettling details is that your future was lost in the wilderness – a place that you and I both look to for peace and restoration.I absolutely hate what happened to you. Every time I think of your fate, my stomach becomes queasy and my body tenses up. I have cried many times over your death, and I have cried for your grieving family.I am not alone in my sorrow. I know many who were deeply troubled by your fate and touched by all the contributions you were able to make during your 24 years of life. I have heard the stories of several individuals who no longer feel safe traveling in the woods because of the darkness you encountered. I, too, admit that for several weeks I didn’t feel safe running or walking in the forest. I spent more time looking over my shoulder than at the path ahead.On one particular hike, I was in a heightened state of paranoia when I finally concluded this isn’t what you would want. You wouldn’t want me to feel threatened in the woods, you wouldn’t want me to live in fear and you would never want to be the barrier that kept people from enjoying creation.Michael Hilton, in his sickened state, managed to instill fear and doubt in individuals throughout the country. But I know those aren’t the byproducts that you would want from your death. You would want laughter, love, and the courage to move forward in the woods and in life.This summer I am hiking the Appalachian Trail and I am doing it in your honor. You will be in my thoughts daily and I hope that you, your family and friends will accept this hike as a living memorial. I am hiking to celebrate the blessings you were through your life, and the legacy you left in your death. I am not just trying to complete the trail, but I am also attempting to set the women’s endurance record on the Appalachian Trail. I want women to know that they shouldn’t fear the woods. Rather, I want them to know that nature should be respected, protected, and enjoyed. I want women of all ages to know that they are capable of amazing accomplishments and that fear should not be something that holds them back. I want to blaze the trail with laughter, kindness, and a confidence that in the future I will encourage others to do the same.I sometimes feel that the loss of your life was similar to someone picking the most beautiful flowers in the forest just as they begin to bloom. I know that the beauty of that individual blossom will never again be replaced, but I hope that my endeavor is an attempt in reseeding. As a hiker you must have been familiar with the term “leave no trace” and with your blessing this summer, together we can work to “leave no evil” in a wilderness that we both call home.With Love and Admiration,Jennifer Pharrlast_img read more

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World Cup of Darts 2020: Former winners England, Netherlands still standing in Salzburg | Darts News

first_imgRob Cross 4-2 Mindaugas Barauskas L16:Canada 2-0 New ZealandJeff Smith 4-1 Haupai Puha The World Cup of Darts draws to a close in Salzburg on Sunday, with four-time winners England and Netherlands battling it out for glory alongside former finalists Wales, Belgium and Australia.- Advertisement – Gerwyn Price is aiming to spearhead Wales to a first World Cup title Michael van Gerwen and Danny Noppert defeat Spain in both singles matches to reach the quarter-finals. Van Gerwen is the only player in the tournament to have experienced World Cup success and the world No 1 will be hoping experience pays dividends as he battles for a fourth individual triumph alongside debutant Danny Noppert.The three-time world champion has endured an uncharacteristically barren period over recent months, although he’s throwing with confidence in Salzburg; having relinquished the solitary leg in his outings up to press.Following their emphatic 5-1 success against Brazil in round one, MVG swept aside Spain’s Toni Alcinas in a matter of minutes with a 102 average, before a fortuitous Noppert survived six match darts against Jesus Noguera. Belgium’s route to the Quarter-Finals Gerwyn Price and Jonny Clayton could be set to create history for two-time finalists Wales, with Belgium and Australia also aiming to make amends for their previous near misses.- Advertisement – Rob Cross said he put too much pressure on himself after Michael Smith won the first rubber and feels he needs to wake up quicker. England have navigated their way through to the quarter-finals with relative ease, despite Michael Smith and Rob Cross failing to really ignite at the Salzburgarena.They overcame the spirited Filpino pairing of Lourence Ilagan and Noel Malicdem in their opener, before relinquishing just two legs during their second round showdown against Lithuania. Saturday’s Second Round results 0:50 Jeff Smith and Matt Campbell won 4-1, 4-2 respectively against New Zealand to reach the quarter-final of the World Cup. England (1) 2-0 Lithuania Kim Huybrechts felt they would’ve lost had they played better competition but Dimitri Van den Bergh still saw the funny side. ‘The Hurricane’ blew away Janis Mustafejevs in a matter of minutes, only for Dimitri Van den Bergh to survive a major scare against Madars Razma – rallying from 3-1 down and converting a nerveless 103 kill in the last leg, to avoid the prospect of a doubles decider.England vs Austria 2:30 Rob Cross said he put too much pressure on himself after Michael Smith won the first rubber and feels he needs to wake up quicker. Netherlands vs Germany Michael Smith whitewashed Darius Labanauskas – who had darts at double in three of the four legs – before Rob Cross produced a late surge in his victory over Mindaugas Barauskas.However, the top seeds may have to improve against hosts Austria, who are bidding to progress to the semi-finals of this event for the first time. England’s route to the Quarter-Finals Canada’s route to the Quarter-Finals L16:Germany 2-0 GreeceGabriel Clemens 4-1 John Michael AfternoonCanada 2-0 New Zealand Austria’s route to the Quarter-Finals Wales (2) 2-1 Scotland Wales vs Australia Matt Campbell 4-2 Cody Harris L16:Netherlands 2-0 SpainMichael van Gerwen 4-0 Toni Alcinas 2:55 Kim Huybrechts felt they would’ve lost had they played better competition but Dimitri Van den Bergh still saw the funny side. Canada are aiming to enter uncharted territory as they target a semi-final spot for the first time in World Cup history, and they’ll take on fifth seeds Belgium – finalists back in 2012.Dimitri Van den Bergh and Kim Huybrechts were positively euphoric after recovering from 3-1 down to prevail against Czech Republic in their opener, but Huybrechts was less than impressed with their insipid second-round display against Latvia. R1:Canada 5-2 Northern Ireland R1:Germany 5-0 Finland Gerwyn Price is aiming to spearhead Wales to a first World Cup title
Gerwyn Price is aiming to spearhead Wales to a first World Cup title

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