… in brief

first_img Previous Article Next Article Thisweek’s news in briefPaydeals reach 3.5%Paysettlements are expected to show an rise of half a per cent to 3.5 per cent inJanuary due to higher inflation in the final quarter of last year, saysindependent pay analysts Industrial Relations Services’ settlement survey.  www.irseclipse.co.ukFirmtakes flu actionAhealth company has devised a flu crisis management programme to limit theimpact of the virus this winter. Alliance Health uses courses of medication toensure employees are immune to the virus or to limit symptoms if it has alreadytaken hold. Each year an estimated 150 million work days are lost due toflu-related illnesses at a cost of £6.75bn.  www.fluprotect.comBassrecruits via webBassHotels and Resorts is exploiting the Internet in an international recruitmentdrive. The company is currently recruiting for 25 hotels in Africa and theMiddle East. Phil Stephenson, area vice-president of human resources, claimsthat the expanding hotel industry is making it difficult to recruit staff.  www.basshotels.comMenneed to listenMalemanagers are undermining companies’ partnership initiatives in the UK becausethey are not able to listen to their staff, Steve Cave, a senior adviser forAcas, told delegates at the Anuman 2001 conference on Tuesday. He said menneeded training to improve their communication and listening skills. He said,”Managers should test themselves on whether they know the names of alltheir staff what they enjoy about their jobs.”  www.acas.org.ukP&Ostaff ballotedP&OTrans European’s tanker drivers are being balloted for strike action, whichcould threaten fuel supplies. Drivers who deliver petrol for Shell will beginvoting today after they rejected a proposed two-year wage deal. The T&Gunion claims the complicated pay deal would only be worth a rise of 2.5 percent on basic pay. www.tgwu.org.ukBubblyon its wayPersonnelmanager at North Yorkshire County Council’s education and library servicesColin Parkin has won the Personnel Today prize draw of a case of champagne fortaking part in the magazine’s survey on employment tribunals. The results ofthe survey were published in 9 January issue. … in briefOn 30 Jan 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. last_img read more

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BYU Football’s Talon Shumway; Utah State’s Jacoby Wildman Named As Semifinalists For Campbell Trophy

first_img Brad James September 25, 2019 /Sports News – Local BYU Football’s Talon Shumway; Utah State’s Jacoby Wildman Named As Semifinalists For Campbell Trophy Tags: BYU Football/Division I/Division II/Division III/FCS/Jacoby Wildman/NAIA/NCAA FBS/NFF National Scholar-Athlete Class/Talon Shumway/Utah State Football FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailIRVING, Texas-Wednesday, BYU receiver Talon Shumway and Utah State defensive end Jacoby Wildman were honored as two of the of 185 semifinalists for the 2019 William V. Campbell trophy.This is annually presented to the best football scholar-athlete in the nation and consists of candidates from NCAA FBS, FCS, Division I, Division II and Division III schools, as well as NAIA schools.The National Football Foundation of Irving, Texas will announce 12-14 finalists October 30 with each receiving an $18,000 post-graduate scholarship as a member of the 2019 NFF National Scholar-Athlete Class.All finalists will also travel to New York City December 10 for the 62nd NFF Annual Awards Dinner. One member of this class will be honored as the 30th recipient of the Campbell Trophy and have his postgraduate scholarship increased to $25,000.This season, Shumway, a senior out of South Jordan, Utah and Lone Peak High School, has amassed seven receptions for 70 yards and a score.Overall in his collegiate career at BYU, Shumway has 57 grabs for 713 yards and four scores.Wildman, a graduate student out of Logan, Utah, has one sack, 3.5 tackles for a loss, 11 total tackles and 8 solo tackles on the season thus far for the Aggies. Written bylast_img read more

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Sr. Research Nurse

first_img Share Sr. Research Nurse School of Medicine -East Baltimore Campus Save Sr. Research Nurse Individual must be a registered nurse, licensed in the State ofMaryland or state wherepracticing.Bachelor’s degree in nursing or related disciplinerequired.Two(2) years of experience in the specialty or a related arearequired.Completion of the JHH credentialing process is required prior tostart date.Current CPR certification required. Must maintain currentlicensure and certification during duration ofemployment.Knowledge of EPIC, BLS, and Infusions/transfusions.Additional experience may substitute for bachelor’s degree andrelated master’s degree may be considered in lieu of someexperience, as permitted by the JHU equivalencyformula.JHUEquivalency Formula:Related 18 graduate degree credits may substitute for someexperience. Additional related experience may substitute forrequired education on the same basis. For jobs where equivalency ispermitted, up to two years of non-related college course work maybe applied towards the total minimum education/experience requiredfor the respective job.PreferredQualifications:Master’s degree stronglypreferred.Special Knowledge, Skills, andAbilities:Sitting in a normal seated position for extended periods oftime.Reaching by extending hand(s) or arm(s) in anydirection.Finger dexterity required to manipulate objects with fingersrather than with whole hand(s) or arm(s), for example, using akeyboard.Communication skills using the spokenword.Ability to see within normalparameters.Ability to hear within normalrange.Ability to move about. Similar jobs LinkedIn The successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject to apre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office at [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply depending on whichcampus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www1.eeoc.gov/employers/upload/eeoc_self_print_poster.pdfImportant legal informationhttp://hrnt.jhu.edu/legal.cfm Maryland, United States Academic Affairs Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Johns Hopkins University You need to sign in or create an account to save Classified title: Sr. ResearchNurseWorking title: Sr. ResearchNurseRole/Level/Range: ACRP37.5/E/04/MFStarting Salary Range: $70,805 – $97,437 (commensurate withexperience)Employee group: Full timeEmployee Status: ExemptSchedule: Monday-Friday – 8:30am-5:00pm37.5hrs/WkLocation: Blalock 3 – 600 N Wolfe St, Baltimore, MD – EastBaltimoreDepartment name:10003311-SOM ICTR Inst Clin TranslationalResearchPersonnel area (School): SOM – School ofMedicineThe successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject toa pre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply dependingon which campus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www.eeoc.gov/sites/default/files/migrated_files/employers/poster_screen_reader_optimized.pdf Twitter Johns Hopkins University Faculty Positions Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Save Sr. Research Nurse Salary Not Specified Salary Not Specifiedcenter_img Maryland, United States The COVID CRU Outpatient Sr.Research Nurse reports directly to the Research Nurse Manager ofthe CRU and Medical Director and carries out outpatient clinicalprocedures in keeping with approved study protocols, clinicpolicies, and good clinical practice (GCP). This position alsoassists the Medical/Clinic Director in the day-to-day oversight ofthe outpatient clinic, the creation and interpretation of clinicpolicy, budgeting and financial oversight, and personnelmanagement. The COVID CRU Outpatient Clinics anticipate seeing 1000outpatient visits on approximately 25 different research protocolseach year. The COVID CRU Outpatient Sr. Research Nurse participatesin almost all of these visits, and must be conversant with each ofthe study protocols using theclinic. Sr. Research Nurse SpecificDuties/Responsibilities:TheCOVID CRU Outpatient Sr. Research Nurse “Nurse” will report to oneor more field-based Clinical Research Units designed to implementclinical research protocols in persons infected and uninfected withSARS-CoV-2. The Nurse will be responsible for transfusion andmonitoring of blood products, medication infusions, injections, andoral administration of medications as well as collection ofbiospecimens including but not limited to nasopharyngeal swabs,blood, urine, and stool. The Nurse will perform study procedures asrequired by each specific protocol and will be responsible forexecuting these procedures according to theprotocol.Implement standards of Good Clinical Practices in the care ofresearch subjects.Provide study-protocol-directed, evidence-based care based onthe nursing process, policies, procedures, and protocols of theJohns Hopkins University andHospital.Insert IV’s, transfuse blood products, monitor infusions, givemedications, conduct patient interviews, collect biospecimens byphlebotomy and other methods, process lab samples, conductQA/inspection of Clinic equipment, perform nursing examinations,obtain vital signs andanthropometrics.Fillout appropriate study paperwork and complete nursingdocumentation.Workcollaboratively with faculty investigators, research nurses, studycoordinators and other members of the study team to ensure thehighest quality, most ethical clinical researchstudy.Identify and advocate for quality improvement initiatives(clinical, financial, operational) that are aligned withdepartmental and organizational safety and operational objectivesand promote cost-effective use of clinicresources.Attend unit meetings, attend protocol start up meetings, and befamiliar with all study protocols being conducted in theclinic.Assist Research Nurse Manager and Medical Director in mentoringand managing other clinic personnel to promote quality, safety, andexcellence in care.Enforce all unit, lab, safety and bedside testing policies forthe unit consistent with JHH/JHU policies and procedures and adhereto all HIPAArequirements.Workunder the direction of the Research Nurse Manager and MedicalDirector to ensure successful completion of each clinical researchstudy and to perform other duties asassigned.Minimum Qualifications: You need to sign in or create an account to save Nursing Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Maryland, United States Save Sr. Research Nurse You need to sign in or create an account to save Salary Not Specified Facebook Johns Hopkins University Sr. Research Nurse Apply(This will open in a new window from which you will be automatically redirected to an external site after 5 seconds) More searches like this Administrative Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Health & Medicine Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimorelast_img read more

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Joining the quarter-century club

first_imgMany a Bostonian has been taunted with accusations of “pahking the cah in Hahvahd Yahd.” But for Glenn Fiore, the phrase recalls nothing so much as a stressful day in 1987, when he rushed to drop off an application for a job as a Harvard building mechanic.“I remember the day so clearly, driving up and down those narrow side streets,” Fiore said. “I didn’t know where to park my car. I said, ‘Hell, if they give me a ticket, they give me a ticket. It’s an investment.’ ”Fiore got a parking ticket — and eventually, the job. As he hobnobbed with other honorees at the Harvard Faculty Club on Nov. 27, remembering that minor brush with the law more than 25 years ago, it was clear that his gamble had paid off.Fiore and 138 other faculty and staff were feted at Harvard’s 25-Year Recognition Ceremony, a 58-year-old tradition honoring long-term employees. As they dined on wine and finger foods, chatted with family and friends, and perused their options for an anniversary gift — including the ever-popular Harvard chair — the honorees took a well-earned break from the workday grind.“This is your time to enjoy the glow of the last 25 years of achievement, and to enjoy the gratitude of the University,” said Marilyn Hausammann, vice president for human resources.President Drew Faust thanked this year’s cohort, whose ranks included everyone from custodians and dining hall checkers to a University Professor (political scientist Gary King).“You all represent just about every dimension of what Harvard does,” Faust told the crowd. “We educate more widely, we reach out to more people, we think, rethink, change, improve, all because of you. You’ve done so much to get Harvard to where it is today.”President Drew Faust: “You all represent just about every dimension of what Harvard does.”While Faust was quick to praise all the honorees’ loyalty to the University, one guest in particular was loyal to Faust herself. George White was working in human resources at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study when Faust, then at Radcliffe, was named president in 2007. He traded 9-to-5 office life to become the manager of Elmwood, the Harvard-owned residence of the president and her husband.“It was a big career U-turn, and I was sort of torn about what my next step was, but I wanted to be part of her administration in some way,” White said. “At first it was a little bit of a shock.”Now he keeps the property up and running for Faust and her visitors, overseeing the 18th-century Georgian that is on the National Register of Historic Places. Maintaining Elmwood’s original character is a high priority, he explained: “It’s such a historic house, and you have two historians living there.”White’s Harvard roots runs deep. A native Cantabrigian, he worked part time at Widener Library during high school and college — where he met his wife, who recently retired from the library after 38 years. (“I think she started at 17,” he said.)“I’m very proud to work here. I think part of that is from being a local,” he said. “Harvard’s always been thought of as a desirable place to work.”“I’m very proud to work here. I think part of that is from being a local,” said George White (right), who oversees Drew Faust’s historic residence.Barbara Wiberg, the Peabody Museum’s administrative coordinator, has also kept Harvard in the family. She arrived with her daughter, Kara Colannino, who has worked at the University for 15 years. Over 25 years, the museum staff has become a second family, Wiberg said. She has seen countless graduate students off to Commencement, although at least one of her charges has come back — Daniel Lieberman, now a professor of human evolutionary biology.“It’s a place where you like to go to work in the morning,” Wiberg said. “It’s never a chore.”Other honorees said their day jobs have allowed them to find new passions. Mick Cusimano, a cartoonist turned head mail clerk at the Harvard Art Museums, has taken 16 graduate courses through the Tuition Assistance Program, including his first video class, which sparked his interest in filmmaking.“Harvard’s enabled me to do a lot of things I wouldn’t have done otherwise,” said Cusimano, who recently returned from showing one of his comedies at the Cyprus International Film Festival.last_img read more

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The tiny flying submarine

first_img <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xuIErOk2h0″ rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/4xuIErOk2h0/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> The RoboBee is a miniature robot that has long been able to fly. But what if the RoboBee lands in water? Using a modified flapping technique, researchers at the Harvard John Paulson School and Wyss Institute have demonstrate that the RoboBee can also swim. This is the first-ever aerial and aquatic capable insect-scale robot. The paper was co-authored by graduate student Farrell Helbling, postdoctoral fellows Nick Gravish and Kevin Ma, and Robert J. Wood, the Charles River Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences at the Harvard Paulson School and a core faculty member at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering.The Harvard RoboBee, designed in Wood’s lab, is a microrobot, smaller than a paper clip, that flies and hovers like an insect, flapping its tiny, nearly invisible wings 120 times per second. In order to make the RoboBee’s transition from air to water, the team first had to solve the problem of surface tension. The RoboBee is so small and lightweight that it cannot break the surface tension of the water. To overcome this hurdle, the RoboBee hovers over the water at an angle, momentarily switches off its wings, and crashes unceremoniously into the water in order to sink.Next the team had to account for water’s increased density.“Water is almost 1,000 times denser than air and would snap the wing off the RoboBee if we didn’t adjust its flapping speed,” said Helbling, the paper’s second author.The team lowered the wing speed from 120 flaps per second to nine but kept the flapping mechanisms and hinge design the same. A swimming RoboBee changes its direction by adjusting the stroke angle of the wings, the same way it does in air. Like a flying version, it is still tethered to a power source. The team prevented the RoboBee from shorting out by using deionized water and coating the electrical connections with glue.While this RoboBee can move seamlessly from air to water, it cannot yet transition from water to air because it can’t generate enough lift without snapping one of its wings. Solving that design challenge is the next phase of the research, according to Chen.“What is really exciting about this research is that our analysis of flapping-wing locomotion is not limited to insect-scaled vehicles,” said Chen. “From millimeter-scaled insects to meter-scaled fishes and birds, flapping locomotion spans a range of sizes. This strategy has the potential to be adapted to larger aerial-aquatic robotic designs.”“Bio-inspired robots, such as the RoboBee, are invaluable tools for a host of interesting experiments — in this case on the fluid mechanics of flapping foils in different fluids,” said Wood. “This is all enabled by the ability to construct complex devices that faithfully re-create some of the features of organisms of interest.”This research was funded by the National Science Foundation and the Wyss Institute. In 1939, a Russian engineer proposed a “flying submarine,” a vehicle that could seamlessly transition from air to water and back. While that may sound like something out of a James Bond film, engineers have been trying to design functional aerial-aquatic vehicles for decades with little success. Now, engineers may be a step closer to creating that elusive flying submarine.The biggest challenge involves the conflicting design requirements. Aerial vehicles require large airfoils such as wings or sails to generate lift, while underwater vehicles need to minimize surface area to reduce drag.To solve this dichotomy, engineers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences took a clue from puffins. The birds with flamboyant beaks are among nature’s most adept hybrid vehicles: the flapping motions they employ to propel themselves through air are similar to those they use to move through water.“Through various theoretical, computational, and experimental studies, we found that the mechanics of flapping propulsion are actually very similar in air and in water,” said Kevin Chen, a graduate student in the Harvard Paulson School’s Microrobotics Lab. “In both cases, the wing is moving back and forth. The only difference is the speed at which the wing flaps.”Coming from the Harvard Microrobotics Lab, this discovery can only mean one thing: swimming RoboBees.Now, researchers at the Harvard Paulson School have demonstrated a flying, swimming, insectlike robot, easing the way to create future aerial-aquatic robotic vehicles. The research was presented recently in a paper at the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems in Germany, where first author Chen accepted the award for best student paper.RoboBee: From Aerial to Aquaticlast_img read more

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Raison d’être of a Support Community

first_imgIn September 2016, we became a member of Dell Technologies. When I attended a huge Day1 event in Japan, I felt it was a good time to reconsider the raison d’être of our Dell EMC Support Community since we will experience lots of (good) changes over the next several months.Why did we develop the Dell EMC Community Network (DECN)? I did not know the answer since when I first became a community manager years ago. However, I could guess some of the reasons: Probably it was created as a digital communication and corroboration space in which users could share information, acquire knowledge and get experience. In addition, as a company’s point of view, Dell EMC would expect to get more customer engagement and support case deflection. These reasons turned out to be all correct! But, let’s start thinking in a different way….Dell Technologies deals with IT infrastructure, which by definition is “The basic physical and organizational structures and facilities (e.g. buildings, roads, power supplies) needed for the operation of a society or enterprise.”I see. This is not far from what I was thinking. IT is definitely a form of infrastructure. Many businesses around the world cannot operate their day-to-day business without it. However, IT is a virtual form of infrastructure. In other words, we cannot leverage IT in the same ways as the other (more tangible) infrastructure examples.What do we need to do to make IT a more simplified, more tangible infrastructure? My answer is “We need great products with great IT infrastructure engineers.” As we all know, Dell Technologies provides industry-leading products. And, what about the other point? IT infrastructure engineers? I know there are hundreds of thousands of great engineers who operate/monitor Dell Technologies products every day.  At the same time, I know some Support Community users are struggling to handle their products. I’d like to continue to assist in the growth of a place that helps customers and employees grow to become successful IT-infrastructure engineers in their companies.As a Dell EMC community manager, what I’d really love to hear from our community members in the coming years is something like “Thank you Dell EMC for your products and your Support Community! The Dell EMC Community Network enables us to continue focusing on our own business, while gaining the advantage by using leading Dell Technology products and leveraging the expertise of infrastructure engineers on the DECN.”We are here to help you. And I am pretty sure community members help us as well! Please join our support community and start on a journey to make IT more simplified and useful with Dell Technologies.Yutaro UeharaIT Social EngagementTwitter: https://twitter.com/ueharauslast_img read more

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Project to tackle vulnerability

first_imgThe seventh annual Edith Stein Project will focus on vulnerability in relationships of every type, conference co-chair junior Margaret Kennedy said. “The theme is ‘Encountering Vulnerability: Courage, Hope and Trust in the 21st Century,’” she said. “We chose to focus on vulnerability this year because we often see it in a negative connotation and run away from it. But we also have a positive necessity of vulnerability in relationships.” Co-chair senior Rebecca Roden said 29 speakers will lecture on the many aspects of vulnerability in daily life. “We thought vulnerability would be a good theme because there is a lot of variation in interpretation and a lot of different ways to go,” Roden said. Professors from several universities, including Notre Dame and Holy Cross, will speak to the audience, as well as individuals in fields related to the conference theme. Kennedy said Project Rachel founder Vicki Thorn will speak on the body’s physical response to love and relationships. Project Rachel is a ministry and resource for women experiencing grief after abortions, according to the project’s website. “We always talk about that we can reduce love down to a series of chemical reactions,” Kennedy said. “But what happens after that? Vicki will look at this.” Popular Notre Dame Philosophy professor David O’Connor will lecture on masculinity and vulnerability, Kennedy said. O’Connor teaches the course “Ancient Wisdom, Modern Love,” which reflects part of the theme of the conference, she said. “He will be juxtaposing Christ and Socrates as examples of masculinity,” Kennedy said. Roden said the planning committee aimed to place students on positive life trajectories and encourage acceptance of vulnerability. “I hope students will have a better sense to answer the question, ‘What does it mean to be vulnerable in relationships with others?’” she said. “I want them to know that’s a positive thing.” Kennedy said the conference always intends to echo the teachings of Edith Stein herself. Stein lived in Germany during the Nazi regime and was killed because of her Jewish heritage. “She’s the patron of our conference because she wrote a lot about dignity of women,” Kennedy said. Though the conference focuses on women from a Catholic perspective, Roden said she wants attendees to know the planning committee hopes to reach a broader audience. “Male students, professors, staff — we want everyone to come,” she said. “Come and bring your questions. Even if you end up disagreeing with a talk or presentation, you could add to the question and answer session or still gain something from it.” Kennedy said 250 students are expected to register. “It’s really cool to bring together so many undergraduates,” Kennedy said. “To bring in that many is to spark a lot of fruitful dialogue.” Kennedy said anyone can register for the conference up until it begins either online or at McKenna Hall, where the conference will be held. The conference begins today at 12:45 p.m. and runs through Saturday. A full schedule of events is available online at nd.edu/~idndlast_img read more

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Mosquito Control

first_imgAs Georgia’s mosquito season draws to a close, mosquito control professionals are looking back, evaluating the season and planning for the challenges they will face next spring. At the top of the list of concerns, voiced at the Georgia Mosquito Control Association (GMCA) meeting this month at the University of Georgia, was chikungunya, a viral disease spread by certain mosquitoes that causes severe joint pain and flu-like symptoms. Drawing on the lessons they’ve learned from battling West Nile Virus outbreaks for the last decade, mosquito control professionals are working with UGA entomologists and Georgia’s public health officials to stay one step ahead of the painful disease come next spring. “The GMCA meeting is a great time for mosquito control professionals in Georgia to gather and share information about emerging threats and the best efforts to protect the public from these pests and diseases,” said Elmer Gray, UGA Extension mosquito specialist and board member of the Georgia Mosquito Control Association. The disease is rarely fatal, but it is painful and, in some cases, has caused long-term joint pain, said Rosemarie Kelly, an entomologist with Georgia Department of Public Health. It’s described as one of those things that, intellectually, you know you’re not going to die of, but you kind of wish you would,” she said. The virus is spread person-to-person by container-breeding mosquitoes and was first diagnosed in the Western Hemisphere in December 2013. Since then it has spread prolifically in South America and the Caribbean. In Georgia, there have been 21 travel-related cases of chikungunya reported to the state Department of Public Health since this summer. All of these patients had traveled on mission trips or vacations to Latin America and contracted it there. It has yet to be spread from person-to-person in Georgia because the mosquito that spreads the disease most efficiently – the yellow fever mosquito, or Aedes aegypti – is fairly rare here. In Florida, where the yellow fever mosquito population is larger, public officials started to see locally transmitted cases of the disease this summer – 11 to date. Even though the yellow fever mosquito is rare in Georgia, epidemiologists and entomologists are worried that the Asian tiger mosquito – an invasive mosquito that has spread to every county in the state – could also spread the virus. Over the course of the three-day conference, mosquito control officials learned the importance of developing close relationships with their local health departments as well as how trapping and identifying mosquitos can help them determine where they need to focus mosquito eradication efforts. In an ideal situation, mosquito control would be notified when someone is diagnosed with chikungunya, and they could work to knock down the mosquito population near that house to minimize the chance of it spreading, Kelly told the mosquito control and private pest control operators at the conference. “The sooner you know about new cases, the sooner you get control of those mosquito populations, and the sooner you can stop the spread of the illness,” Henry Lewandowski, director of Savannah’s mosquito control program, told the crowd. Georgians who are diagnosed with chikungunya or suspect they have it after returning from their travels should avoid mosquito exposure for 10 days. Ten days after the onset of symptoms, the virus will have left the body and can no longer be transmitted via mosquito. As with West Nile Virus and other mosquito-borne diseases, the best defense is a good offense, Gray said. Gray recommends that Georgians routinely clear their yards of containers that can hold water, providing a breeding habitat for mosquitoes. He also recommends using a mosquito repellent containing DEET when spending time outdoors. For more information about chikungunya, visit cdc.gov/chikungunya or search for “chikungunya” at dph.georgia.gov.last_img read more

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Drug Traffickers Linked to Disturbances in Guatemalan Town

first_imgBy Dialogo May 04, 2012 Guatemalan President Otto Pérez stated on May 2 that drug traffickers were behind the disturbances in an indigenous town on the border with Mexico on May 1, which forced the government to decree a state of emergency for 30 days. “There are situations that I’m not willing to allow, and for that reason, a state of emergency is being ordered. I’m asking for the cooperation of the Interior Ministry and the Public Prosecutor’s Office to execute the arrest warrants issued for those responsible for aggression against the authorities,” the president said at a press conference. Pérez said that he was not ruling out the possibility that the disturbances may have been provoked by groups dedicated to organized crime, especially drug trafficking, with the aim of encouraging calls for the Army to leave the town or involving Military personnel in incidents with civilians. On the evening of May 1, the president decreed a state of emergency in the indigenous town of Santa Cruz Barillas (Huehuetenango), around 415 kilometers northwest of the capital, on the border with Mexico, following violent disturbances. The origin of the incidents was the death of an indigenous man, allegedly at the hands of private security personnel for a firm building a hydroelectric plant in that community. A crowd of at least 300 inhabitants caused property damage and attacked soldiers at the Military garrison, from which four rifles were stolen, three of which have already been recovered, according to Army spokesperson Rony Urizar. Pérez urged the authorities to execute at least 21 arrest warrants issued for those alleged to be responsible for provoking the disturbances. The authorities resumed control of the city on May 2, while around 450 police officers and 500 soldiers were dispatched to reinforce security. Under the state of emergency, several constitutional guarantees are suspended, such as the right to carry firearms and the right of assembly, and anyone suspected of conspiring against the state can be arrested without a warrant, according to the Public Order Act. This is the first time that the president has resorted to this measure since taking office on January 14, but his predecessor Álvaro Colom (2008-2012) used it on several occasions. When a State is threatened in its security and governance, it is autonomous to use the power in any of its expressions to restore and maintain the security of its territory, provided that it is covered by its laws to exercise the form of power and respecting human rights.last_img read more

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