Warm climate isotopic simulations: what do we learn about interglacial signals in Greenland ice cores?

first_imgMeasurements of Last Interglacial stable water isotopes in ice cores show that central Greenland d18Oincreased by at least 3& compared to present day. Attempting to quantify the Greenland interglacialtemperature change from these ice core measurements rests on our ability to interpret the stable waterisotope content of Greenland snow. Current orbitally driven interglacial simulations do not show d18O ortemperature rises of the correct magnitude, leading to difficulty in using only these experiments toinform our understanding of higher interglacial d18O. Here, analysis of greenhouse gas warmed simulationsfrom two isotope-enabled general circulation models, in conjunction with a set of Last Interglacialsea surface observations, indicates a possible explanation for the interglacial d18O rise. A reduction in thewinter time sea ice concentration around the northern half of Greenland, together with an increase in seasurface temperatures over the same region, is found to be sufficient to drive a >3& interglacialenrichment in central Greenland snow. Warm climate d18O and dD in precipitation falling on Greenlandare shown to be strongly influenced by local sea surface condition changes: local sea surface warmingand a shrunken sea ice extent increase the proportion of water vapour from local (isotopically enriched)sources, compared to that from distal (isotopically depleted) sources. Precipitation intermittencychanges, under warmer conditions, leads to geographical variability in the d18O against temperaturegradients across Greenland. Little sea surface warming around the northern areas of Greenland leads tolow d18O against temperature gradients (0.1e0.3& per �C), whilst large sea surface warmings in theseregions leads to higher gradients (0.3e0.7& per �C). These gradients imply a wide possible range ofpresent day to interglacial temperature increases (4 to >10 �C). Thus, we find that uncertainty about localinterglacial sea surface conditions, rather than precipitation intermittency changes, may lead to thelargest uncertainties in interpreting temperature from Greenland ice cores. We find that interglacial seasurface change observational records are currently insufficient to enable discrimination between thesedifferent d18O against temperature gradients. In conclusion, further information on interglacial sea surfacetemperatures and sea ice changes around northern Greenland should indicate whether þ5 �C duringthe Last Interglacial is sufficient to drive the observed ice core d18O increase, or whether a larger temperatureincreases or ice sheet changes are also required to explain the ice core observations.last_img read more

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Prep Sports Roundup: 2/24

first_img Written by February 24, 2021 /Sports News – Local Prep Sports Roundup: 2/24 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailBoys Basketball2-A State TournamentState Championship Game @ SVCRICHFIELD, Utah-Jerheim Elder posted 19 points on 7 of 7 from the field as the Layton Christian Eagles won their fifth all-time state championship game, prevailing 60-53 over Enterprise. The proficient Eagles shot 56 percent (19-34) from the field and 50 percent behind the arc to earn the state title. The Eagles have won state championships at both the 1-A and 2-A levels of competition in 2007 (1-A), 2012 (1-A), 2017 (2-A), 2019 (2-A) and 2021 (2-A). Breckon Nelseon posted 14 points in defeat for the Wolves.3rd-4th Place Game @ SVCRICHFIELD, Utah-Conner Crum had 14 points on 5-9 from the field as the Beaver Beavers dismantled Parowan 58-34 at the 2-A State tournament Wednesday at the Sevier Valley Center, earning third place. Krue Stubbs had 15 points and 6 rebounds in defeat for the Rams.5th-6th Place Game @ SVCRICHFIELD, Utah-Derek Atkinson posted 20 points and Draper APA routed North Summit 73-55 to earn 5th place Wednesday at the Sevier Valley Center at the 2-A State Tournament. Treyson Pace had 13 points and 8 rebounds in defeat for the Braves.Girls Basketball2-A State TournamentState Championship Game @ SVCRICHFIELD, Utah-Marci Richins amassed 30 points and 9 rebounds on 14-21 from the field as the North Summit Braves won their first state title since 1986 with a 65-48 rout of Kanab at the Sevier Valley Center Wednesday to win the 2-A state championship. Hadley Richins added 16 points and 9 assists on 6-10 from the field for the Braves, who have three state titles all-time in school history (1984, 1986, 2021). Grayce Glover netted 28 points, including six 3-pointers, in the loss for Kanab. North Summit ends their championship season with a record of 20-4 and Kanab concludes this campaign with a 15-5 mark en route to spring sports.3rd-4th Place Game @ SVCRICHFIELD, Utah-Eliza Swallow netted 22 points and 13 rebounds on 9-13 from the field as the Millard Eagles edged Layton Christian 59-58 at the Sevier Valley Center at the 2-A State Tournament  to clinch third place. Patricia Martinez-Ramirez had a game-high 27 points on 10-20 in the loss for Layton Christians Eagles.5th-6th Place Game @ SVCRICHFIELD, Utah-Halle Hutchings had 8 points and 5 rebounds as the Beaver Beavers earned 5th place at the 2-A State Tournament Wednesday at the Sevier Valley Center. The Beavers end the season at 17-6 and 8-2 in Region 18 play. Noah Moyle had 7 points and 6 rebounds in the loss for the Wolves.center_img Brad Jameslast_img read more

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New Commander aboard USCGC Alex Haley

first_img View post tag: Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today New Commander aboard USCGC Alex Haley View post tag: News by topic July 10, 2015 Authorities View post tag: USCGC Alex Haley Cmdr. Stephen White transferred command of the US Coast Guard Cutter Alex Haley to Cmdr. Seth Denning during a change of command ceremony at Coast Guard Base Kodiak, Alaska, on Thursday.The ceremony was presided over by Rear Adm. Meredith Austin, deputy commander, Coast Guard Pacific Area.White assumed command of the Alex Haley in 2013. He will transfer to Santa Monica, California to participate in an executive fellowship at the RAND Corporation.Denning was previously assigned as executive officer of the Coast Guard Cutter Mellon, where he also completed a tour as the engineer officer.[mappress mapid=”16452″]Image: USCGcenter_img View post tag: Commander View post tag: Naval Share this article New Commander aboard USCGC Alex Haley View post tag: americaslast_img read more

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“READERS FORUM” OCTOBER 18, 2019

first_imgWe hope that today’s “READERS FORUM” will provoke honest and open dialogue concerning issues that we, as responsible citizens of this community, need to address in a rational and responsible way? WHATS ON YOUR MIND TODAY?Todays“Readers Poll” question is: If the election was held tomorrow for the Vanderburgh County Prosecutor race who would you vote for?If you would like to advertise on the CCO please contact us [email protected]: City-County Observer Comment Policy.  Be kind to people. No personal attacks or harassment will not be tolerated and shall be removed from our site.We understand that sometimes people don’t always agree and discussions may become a little heated.  The use of offensive language, insults against commenters will not be tolerated and will be removed from our site.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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viewpoint

first_imgThis week, I was passed down a family recipe hailing from the Gwendraeth Valleys in West Wales – one which utilises bread in a hitherto forgotten way. It’s called siencyn (pronounced shen-kin). Imagine the following delight: tea, sugar, bread and lumps of cheese, all in a bowl. That’s right, cheesy bready tea. Yum.To my spoiled 21st-century eyes, siencyn, while no doubt a treat in the 1940s, is a prime example of ’it seemed a good idea at the time’. The same could be said of Premier’s acquisition of RHM, which, 12 months down the line, may be proving equally unpalatable to shareholders, who are facing a 50% cut in dividends (pg 4).While Warburtons has been flying high, Premier Foods’ ambitious purchase of RHM last year has been less successful. Warbies is going from strength to strength, up 18% in value sales in 2007, according to figures from AC Nielsen (pg 6). Contrast that with the fortunes of Hovis, which fell 4.5%. A revitalised Kingsmill, jumping 6%, merely rubs Premier’s nose in it.Nobody could pretend that things have gone swimmingly, and, unfortunately for Premier, market conditions following the buyout could not have been worse. Who could have foreseen the pitfalls lurking around the corner a year ago, such as wheat prices doubling? This contributed to a near-50% drop in trading profits for the company’s Bread Bakeries Division, which comprises RHM.The firm is unrepentant about the landmark acquisition, which cost £1.2bn. And who wouldn’t be, having splashed out in such spectacular fashion to become the UK’s undisputed heavyweight of the food industry?Chief executive Robert Schofield says that Premier is on track to meet its cost synergies, recover the bulk of the ingredients cost inflation through price rises in the first quarter of 2008, and invest in capital and new recipes.But the company has put the brakes on promotional activity, at least for the first half of this year, which must be music to the ears of both Warburtons and Kingsmill.As an afterthought, if I see siencyn on Pret A Manger’s menu in six months, I’ll be claiming royalties.last_img read more

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Surveillence video released of motorcycle shop theft in Elkhart

first_img Pinterest Surveillence video released of motorcycle shop theft in Elkhart By Jon Zimney – May 7, 2020 1 845 Pinterest Previous articleSt. Mary’s College to reopen to students for the fall semesterNext articleGov. Whitmer extends Michigan’s Stay At Home order until May 28 Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Twitter WhatsApp Twitter Facebook Google+ IndianaLocalNews Facebook (Photo supplied/Elkhart City Police) Elkhart Police have released surveillance video of suspects who they say broke into North End Cycle Shop on Cassopolis Street and used a U-Haul to steal several motorcycles.The burglary happened around 4:50 a.m. on Tuesday, April 28.Multiple people wearing hooded sweatshirts broke into the building and loaded the motorcycles into the U-Haul, according to Elkhart Police.Anybody with information is asked to contact Elkhart Police at 574-295-7070 or Det. Janis at 574-389-4711. WhatsApp Google+last_img read more

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New faculty members excited to share, and build, knowledge

first_imgOne will teach on the history of science and can’t wait to take her students to see 15th- and 16th-century books in Houghton Library. Another, who will teach religion, is thrilled to call scholars whose work she admires her colleagues. A third, at the Business School, feels happily overwhelmed by teaching, advising students, and taking on administrative responsibilities.Each year, Harvard welcomes a new class of ladder faculty. Theirs are the other new faces on campus, and their excitement is somewhat similar to that of freshmen. They start their academic careers with a mix of glee and wonder.Todne Thomas, assistant professor of African-American religions at Harvard Divinity School, admits she’s starstruck by some of her colleagues. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer“It’s almost surreal,” said Todne Thomas, an assistant professor of African-American religions at Harvard Divinity School and the Suzanne Young Murray Assistant Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. “Seeing faculty whose work I’ve been reading over the years and finding out that they’re just down the hall, there is a kind of positive surreal quality to it, even as you’re trying to find your way into the new culture.”Hannah Marcus, an assistant professor at the Department of the History of Science, said she felt the same way.“I’m thrilled to be here,” said Marcus, whose teaching interests include the early history of medicine and the body, art and technology in the Renaissance, and the relationship between faith and science in the early modern period. “Getting started at Harvard is very exciting. There are so many fascinating people to meet and infinite resources to support my teaching and research.”For Scott Kominers, M.B.A. Class of 1960 Associate Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School (HBS) and a faculty affiliate at the Department of Economics and the Center of Mathematical Sciences and Applications, teaching at Harvard is a wondrous opportunity.“It’s awesome,” said Kominers. “I literally have my dream job.”Find mentors and take advantage of Harvard’s many resources, Provost Alan Garber ’76 urged dozens of new faculty members in his welcoming speech. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerThe three newly appointed professors attended the New Ladder Faculty Institute last week at the Faculty Club, along with 50 other incoming faculty members from across the University. The event, hosted by the office of Faculty Development and Diversity, was a chance to meet new colleagues and learn about resources for teaching and research.It was also a chance to take stock of the Harvard’s efforts to develop a more diverse faculty. According to the Faculty Development and Diversity office, of Harvard ladder faculty, which includes tenured full professors and tenure-track faculty, 30 percent are female and 22 percent are minorities.In the class of new tenure-track faculty, more than 40 percent are female and 37 percent are minorities, which is “very different from the Harvard of the past,” said Judith Singer, senior vice provost for faculty development and diversity and the James Bryant Conant Professor of Education.“The University is increasingly diverse,” Singer said. “And it’s part of a conscious decision. We think we can be a stronger faculty by being a more diverse faculty and by welcoming voices that previously may not have been part of Harvard, but those voices we really want to hear at the table.”Provost Alan Garber urged new professors to use the tools available to carry out research and enhance teaching, but mostly he exhorted them to find mentors, ask questions, and take advantage of libraries, museums, and other campus resources.“For many people, it’s so easy to become fully engaged in your School or your department that you may lose sight of what’s going on across the University and how you might benefit from becoming involved in the University more broadly,” said Garber. “If you don’t take advantage of the fact that you have colleagues with expertise in virtually every academic endeavor who, if nothing else, will educate you in a very broad sense, you’re missing out a lot of what makes Harvard such a special place.”Andy Wu, an assistant professor of business administration in his second year at the Business School, offered advice to newcomers. He found his first year “exciting and hectic” as he tried to navigate the School and adjust to a new life in a new city.“The biggest challenge is managing your time,” said Wu. “Harvard is like being in a candy shop. There are so many fun and exciting things to do, but you can’t eat too much candy. You have to figure out which candy you want and enjoy the few pieces of candy you get.”Vilsa Curto ’08, an assistant professor of health economics and policy at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said she was excited to be back at Harvard but also mindful of the hard work ahead.“It’s a wonderful and humbling experience,” she said. “But the challenge is to stay focused, try to keep producing high-quality work, and take advantage of this community of people to help you develop your ideas, and keep the momentum going.”last_img read more

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Fifth-year seniors search for campus community after classmates graduate

first_imgFor fifth-year accountant student Mike Quinn, the phrase “home under the dome” has lost a bit of its meaning. “The campus of Notre Dame was home as an undergraduate,” he said. “Now, our home base is Mendoza. If you want to go somewhere else on campus it feels very disconnected.” Quinn is one of many students who decide to attend the University an extra year to complete degrees in specialized fields. But Quinn said he encountered disconnect in his fifth year. “I felt jealous that [my friends] got to go be on their own feet and I was stuck with the same college routine,” he said. “They have their responsibility at work whereas someone like me who’s staying in graduate school, we still have to go to class, do homework and group projects and have exams to worry about. It’s like a whole new step of life.” Quinn said he rarely moves beyond DeBartolo Quad for classes and feels removed from the days of dorm life and spending time in LaFortune or the dining hall, not to mention the shift in his social life, he said. “The people I knew who were staying the fifth year were the people who you’d give the head nod to or chitchatted with after class, but not necessarily great, true friends,” he said. John Villecco, a fifth-year senior completing a double major in anthropology and PLS, agreed. “Most people at the end of last year had regrets about having to leave,” he said. “But it’s been really interesting to see them go off and have them live their lives, and I still have this safety net while I can observe them from afar. I’ve been able to spend more time reflecting on what I want my life to look like. “[They’ve] been a buffer so that I feel ready to leave now.” Villecco said the number of people he recognizes on campus has decreased, but it has allowed him to foster more in-depth friendships. “[The fifth year] allowed me to focus more on a smaller group of friends,” he said. With a more intimate group of friends, Villecco said his classmates compare schedules more often and have settled into a more consistent routine than he did in his previous years. It also allows them to veer away from social norms, he said.  “It’s easier to have a good sense of self,” he said. “You almost feel like you’re not required to abide by as many social rules. I’m separate in a positive way. I’m separate from [social] expectations.”last_img read more

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A bird’s-eye view.

first_imgBy Brad HaireUniversity of GeorgiaTIFTON, Ga. — Farmers have to keep a sharp eye on their fields. A lot can go wrong if they don’t. But to really see and understand a situation, you sometimes have to step back from it. Or step up. Way up.Aerial HelpAerial images of fields can help farmers better manage their crops and save them time and money, said Tasha Wells, a research coordinator at the National Environmentally Sound Production Agriculture Laboratory here.Wells is coordinating research on a cost-efficient aerial camera system to use in low-flying airplanes. She and other experts with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences are developing this system with the help of a local pilot.The system is portable and built using off-the-shelf components. But some airplanes will require major adjustments to use the system. Wells hopes a new local business can be created from this research.The aerial imagery research has already helped some farmers see their fields in different ways, she said.VariationsFarm fields, even small ones, can have a lot of variations, she said. The distinct patterns of weeds, crop growth and soil types become more distinct from a bird’s-eye view.Couple the aerial photo with Global Positioning Satellite and software technologies, and you have more than just a picture. You have a precise reference tool that shows what’s happening to a crop in a field.”We can use the images to see what areas of a field are similar and what areas are different,” she said. “And the farmer can determine how best to deal with these areas.”Farmers need this kind of information more than ever.Decision-makerThe U.S. farm economy was hurting well before the Sept. 11 attacks put the overall national economy into question. The profit margin for many U.S. farmers has dramatically narrowed over the past decade.Farmers need decision-making tools to help them better use farm resources such as fertilizers, herbicides and water, Wells said. Right now, the difference between making and losing money for many farmers greatly depends on how well they know their fields and how much or how little they use these resources.But even in good economic times, she said, farmers want to know how to use these resources wisely.Precision ToolsPrecision agriculture technology, like aerial imagery, primary purpose is to identify and measure the variability within a field.“Managing this variability for optimal gain often means decreasing inputs in the less productive areas and increasing inputs in the more productive regions,” she said. “So, instead of making fields more uniform, more often than not variability may be enhanced.”The overall goal of precision agriculture research, Wells said, is to develop tools farmers can use to make better, more efficient decisions on how to grow their crops.No one tool is the “silver bullet,” she said, for perfect crop-management decisions. But the more detailed information a farmer gets, the better his decisions. “The aerial imagery is just one way, or means, to develop these low-cost reference tools for farmers,” she said.last_img read more

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