Simulation of EMIC wave excitation in a model magnetosphere including structured high-density plumes

first_imgThe HOTRAY code is used to evaluate the path integrated gain of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves as a function of frequency in two propagation bands above the O+ and He+ gyrofrequencies. Calculations are performed over a range of L shell (3 < L 40 dB) is found near the plasmapause, within regions with density structure in the plume, and in the low-density trough at L >= 6.5. As a self-consistent test on whether EMIC waves play an important role in relativistic electron loss from the radiation belts, the minimum cyclotron resonant electron energy is evaluated as a function of wave frequency and L shell for those EMIC waves that exhibit significant gain. The lowest electron resonant energies (approximately a few MeV) are found in structured plumes. The sensitivities of both the wave gain and electron minimum resonant energy to variation in thermal ion compositions, the energetic proton properties, or plume density structure are also investigated.last_img read more

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News story: VAT recovery for financial services exports in a no deal scenario

first_imgThe legislation allowing this has been laid today and is available here.This will bring the VAT treatment of such supplies to EU customers into line with the treatment that applies to supplies made to customers in the rest of the world. It will also ensure that UK companies compete for business in the EU on an even footing with companies in other non-EU countries.This legislation provides for a situation where the UK withdraws from the EU without a deal. If a deal is agreed, the legislation will not be enacted and the current VAT treatment will continue throughout the implementation period set out in the Withdrawal Agreement.last_img read more

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Office hours: 6 realities

first_imgIn a time-honored academic ritual, professors tell their students at the start of each semester to visit them during regular office hours, whether to seek academic advice or just to say hello.Over the years, office hours, that academic institution established to foster deeper relationships between students and professors, have taken some fresh forms. Along with staffing regular hours, some professors talk with students while walking around campus, and a few invite students to catch up outside the office. Many use Skype to reach students.Yet the reality is that not many students regularly visit offices, though more tend to show up during the weeks of midterms or final exams. So professors may spend much of that scheduled time catching up on emails, writing articles, and preparing for classes.Professors often ask students to email them to book appointments. But in a tech-dominant world, they are increasingly turning to Doodle polls, Google spreadsheets, or sites such as calendy.com or wikispaces.com to book sessions. In September, CS50, the popular introductory course to computer science, began offering virtual office hours, during which teaching fellows chat with students and use software to connect with students’ computers remotely.To understand how the traditional practice works now, the Gazette contacted six professors for their comments on office hours, the institution and the reality.Caetano Hanta-Davis ’18 and Katherine Merseth chat during her office hours. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerKatherine MersethSenior lecturer on education at the Graduate School of EducationWebsite: Katherine MersethOffice: Longfellow 305Office hours arrangement: Sign up via Wikispaces ClassroomAt the heart of the undergraduate experience are relationships with others.“Each week I have somewhere between 10 and 15 students come to office hours. I post them and students sign up. We talk for 20 minutes about the class or about anything that is on their minds.I see office hours as an important method to get to know my students, and that helps me teach better.I suspect students don’t come to office hours because they don’t think they are worthy of the professor’s time, or they have attended an office hour and the faculty member was not very welcoming. They feel like they are imposing.At the heart of the undergraduate experience are relationships with others. Office hours are a way for professor and student to communicate outside of the pressure and sometimes hurried nature of a class. To persuade students to come to office hours, professors can invite students genuinely, and also post their office hours in a way that students can easily sign up. If a student has to call a staff assistant or the professor, that sometimes is too big of a hurdle. I announce in my class several times that I have time to see them, and that I think it is important. Over the last few years I would say that 90 percent of my students have come to see me.”* * *Joe Blitzstein meets with students Caitlyn Dang ’20 and Albert Zeng ’20. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerJoe BlitzsteinProfessor of the practice in statistics and co-director of undergraduate studies at the Department of Statistics. Website: Joe BlitzsteinOffice: Science Center 714Office hours arrangement: No appointment necessary during regularly scheduled hours. Individual meetings are scheduled by appointment via email. Use calendly.com to book several individual meetings.Professors should think carefully about when to schedule office hours, and make sure to be welcoming.“I have two office hours per week, and each hour typically has five to 10 students if I am teaching a large course.Office hours are a good opportunity for faculty and students to discuss the material one-on-one (or in small groups), which can be very informative and interesting for everyone. Conversations often also go beyond the course material into how the ideas are connected to other fields and applicable to the student’s long-term goals.There could be many reasons for students not to come to office hours. For example, they could be at a time the student can’t attend (people tend to have very packed schedules here), or the student may not feel they have questions (they may feel they understand the material, or may be confused about some material but not be sure what to ask), or they may think it’s somewhat intimidating, or they may be getting plenty of help in various other ways.Professors should think carefully about when to schedule office hours, and make sure to be welcoming.”* * *Tomiko Brown-Nagin (right) helps Graduate School of Arts and Sciences student Elizabeth Ross with her thesis proposal. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerTomiko Brown-NaginDaniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard Law School, professor of history in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, co-director of the Law School’s Program in Law and History, and faculty director of the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race & Justice.Website: Tomiko Brown-NaginOffice: Hauser 310Office hours arrangement: Regular drop-in hours and by appointment via e-mail.Interpersonal interaction in less-formal settings can result in greater understanding of concepts taught in class.“I am not teaching this semester. But when I do, I would say that between three to five students visit my office hours on a regular basis. These students tend to be the ones who already are engaged in class and are doing well.I strongly encourage all of my students to visit during office hours because interpersonal interaction in less-formal settings can result in greater understanding of concepts taught in class. These interactions also can help put students at ease in class and therefore result in more and better classroom engagement. Of course, whether, in fact, office hours are beneficial in such ways depends on the personalities and emotional intelligence of particular students and professors.While I cannot be sure, I would imagine that office hours are underutilized because students find professors intimidating or inaccessible, for fear that they have nothing important to say to professors, and/or because students do not see the value of interacting with professors outside of the classroom.In the weeks just before Constitutional Law exams, probably half the class will visit office hours. In order to increase student use of office hours before the exam period, I have toyed with making them mandatory.”* * *Regan Brady ’21 (left) and Emily Markowitz ’21 drop in to see Greg Mankiw. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerGreg MankiwRobert M. Beren Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics.Website: Greg MankiwOffice: Littauer Center 223Office hours arrangement: Regular drop-in office hours. To schedule a meeting outside those, students should email the professor for an appointment.You don’t need a question to come to office hours. You can just come by to say hello.“The number of students who come to my office hours varies. I would say about a dozen on average, but Ec10 [the introductory economics course] is a large class. A dozen represents only about 2 percent of the class.Office hours offer students a chance to have personal interactions with faculty, to discuss how course material fits with other things they are studying, and to get advice about course options and career paths.Some students don’t come to office hours because they are busy, others because they are intimidated or don’t feel their questions are sufficiently important. I explain to students that you don’t need a question to come to office hours. You can just come by to say hello.”* * *“It makes the school less mysterious if you know both other students and professors,” Annette Gordon-Reed says. File photo by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerAnnette Gordon-ReedCharles Warren Professor of American Legal History, professor of history in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.Website: Annette Gordon-ReedOffice: Griswold 405Office hours arrangement: By appointment via email.Professors can be a resource, and students should take advantage of all the resources the University has to offer.“Students tend to come near the end of the semester when they are getting ready for the exam. Visits earlier in the semester are more often about career path questions or other life issues.I tell students to come to talk to me after class and arrange a time to meet if they have things they want to talk about.I try to emphasize that it’s good for students to come to talk to professors, and that they are welcome. I think it makes the school less mysterious if you know both other students and professors. There will be many instances, depending upon what field students go into, when it will be important to have references from people who can speak about a student other than having given them a grade. Professors can be a resource, and students should take advantage of all the resources the University has to offer.”* * *Steven Pinker lists office hours in the syllabus and makes individual appointments. Harvard file photoSteven PinkerJohnstone Family Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychology.Website: Steven PinkerOffice: 970 William James HallOffice hours arrangement: By appointment via email. (He is on sabbatical this year.)Office hours matter: to explore ideas in greater depth than what’s possible in a lecture hall; to confirm understanding.“Few students come to office hours — often none, though some years there is a nice group of three to five who come every week.Frankly I don’t understand why more students don’t show up. The hours are listed in the syllabus, and I also make individual appointments with any student who requests one. It’s part of the general attitude in the College that classes are just one part, for many a minor part, of the Harvard experience. Extracurriculars and networking with other students come first.Office hours matter: to explore ideas in greater depth than what’s possible in a lecture hall; to confirm understanding; to look behind the scenes in the generation of knowledge.I wish I knew what professors can do to persuade students to come to office hours! As I mentioned, a change in the College culture in which academics is given greater weight would be a start.”last_img read more

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Black Lives Matter founders discuss motives behind movement

first_imgRosie LoVoi Patrisse Cullors, right, along with Opal Tometi, center, gave a lecture Monday night in DeBartolo Hall about #BlackLivesMatter, a hashtag they started, which ignited a social movement across the nation.“We started using social media to connect this community and to amplify the message that our lives matter, despite a society and a system that continues to devalue and continues to dispose of us in a way that is egregious. It’s deplorable, and we know it’s happening,” Tometi said. “We used this platform to connect with more and more of our brothers and sisters from across the country, moving from discussions around police brutality and addressing state violence more broadly. We knew police brutality was just one facet of the violence our community is facing.”The pair shared their stories and how it shaped their involvement in the movement: Tometi is the daughter of undocumented Nigerian immigrants and Cullors grew up “very poor” in Los Angeles, which she said has a particularly brutal police department.“By the time I was about 13 years old, almost every young boy in my neighborhood had been arrested, had been to juvenile hall and a young boy named Matthew was given a 25-year sentence at 14 years old,” Cullors said. “And I was disturbed, to say the least, as a child. Even as I child I knew that was not right, that was not correct.”Both talked about their experiences as activists, not only with Black Lives Matter, but previously as well: Tometi worked with immigration issues and Cullors with the penal systems. “We’re taking into account that many of us, in this type of work, oftentimes feel that justice won’t come, or we’re cynical about the system,” Tometi said. “We know it wasn’t really made for us or that it was made to do exactly what it’s doing right now, and we carry that.”Tometi answered students’ questions about how to become effective activists.“My basic advice is to do the work,” she said. “Oftentimes, it can be very theoretical, and we find a bit of safety in theorizing about the challenges and theorizing solutions. But if you’re going to be a scholar-activist, you have to engage. You have to take a step of faith and join the movement. “This is the call. We need everybody on deck for this time in our history, and it requires both theory and practice. Do it in a community. You are not by yourself. You’re in a room full of folks who have conscience and who care. You’re not by yourself in this, and I think that’s oftentimes the myth we’re sold and we buy into, that you’re the only one who cares about these issues.”The lecture was part of Walk the Walk Week, in celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., who Cullors said was an example of activism that engaged, citing King’s 32 arrests as evidence.“We have a long history in the black community of disruption, a long legacy,” Cullors said. “What we’re doing here is we’re adding to that legacy and we should be proud of it and embrace it. The only way we’ve seen systemic change happen in this country is disruption. “It’s not through sitting with elected officials behind back doors — that’s not been the way that we’ve seen an evolution in the culture. We would still be segregated if that were the case. Jim Crow segregation — because we’re still segregated — would still exist.”Within the Black Lives Matter movement, specifically, Cullors and Tometi stressed the importance of “collective care” and “healing justice” to allow activists to continue to work “long distance.”“Healing justice is key in our work, in the Black Lives Matter network and movement,” Cullors said. “In this generation, we’re really trying to understand what care looks like. How are we in this movement and caring for ourselves and caring for each other, and how do we do this as long time runners? “What we’ve witnessed is trauma exists everywhere, whether through being in PWIs [predominantly white institutions], whether that’s through having to see the consistent killings and brutalization of our people or whether that’s just living your life as a black person.” Cullors said she didn’t want to “pigeonhole” what might be in store for Black Lives Matter in the future, but Tometi said she feels positively about the success Black Lives Matter has had in creating a new future.“That’s what Black Lives is saying – we’re going to create a world in which our lives matter, whether you like it or not,” Tometi said. “That world is coming. It has to come.” Tags: Black lives matter, martin luther king jr. day, Walk the Walk Week Patrisse Cullors and Opal Tometi, who, along with Alicia Garza, started the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter as a response to the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the Trayvon Martin case, gave the keynote lecture for Walk the Walk Week on Monday night to a crowd of over 500 students, staff and community members. Cullors and Tometi said the phrase started in a Facebook post made by their co-founder, Garza, which was then used as a hashtag that went viral.last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s students to perform dance recital for students, community

first_imgWhile many students are wrapping up final papers and putting finishing touches on their projects, students in Saint Mary’s Jane Austen Dance class are preparing for their Grand Ball. The one-credit class is taught by professors Chris Cobb and Rosalind Clark. It provides an introduction to traditional English country dance popular in the time period Jane Austen lived in and wrote about. It features dances in popular books like “Pride and Prejudice” and “Emma.” The class concludes with a Grand Ball in which the students perform the dances for the South Bend community.Senior Leal Alday, who is currently taking the class for the third time, is excited to participate in her third Grand Ball. “They have a live band, so it’s really neat,” Alday said. “It’s a lot of fun because it’s not the type of dance for everyone, but it’s a fun type of dance. It’s active enough that you break a sweat, but you’re not dying at the end. It’s exciting to do it all with the people.”According to Alday and MacKenzie Rizzo, another senior in the class, a big reason why the class is so enjoyable is because of the professors.“Professor Clark is very enthusiastic and into it,” Alday said. “The dress she wears to the ball was made by her mother. She’s always excited, and her excitement is contagious. Professor Bonnell, another English professor, wears a full period dress complete with a cravat and everything.“Rizzo said the class offers a chance for students to relax and enjoy time with their classmates in a more casual environment than most classes. “It feels like a place for the whole English department to take a break for an hour on a Friday, make jokes and dance together,” said Rizzo. It’s fun to see … our professors in that environment. Professor Cobb is different in the Jane Austen class. A weight is lifted off his shoulders, and it’s a nice thing to see.” The Grand Ball  is open for the public to come watch. According to Alday, the audience sits in an upper balcony of the church normally reserved for the choir.“It’s held every semester, and there are community people that come every year to see,” Alday said. “It’s fun to dance in front of an audience. It’s not so many people that it creates pressure, but it’s cool for people to see what we’ve been working on.”Though period dress is not required for the audience or dancers, it is greatly encouraged. Students often use a local costume store to find costumes to wear.“Professor Clark has a friend with the local Casaday Costume Company, so a lot of people rent from there,” Alday said. “I’m going to be looking for a dress there Thursday, and if I  don’t find anything I’ll just wear something nice,” Rizzo said. “The professors want people to dress up more than they care about period dress. They want to see people dress nice and have fun.”The class learns about 10 dances and the professors cycle through a different set of dances each semester, so the class can be retaken for credit. Rizzo said you learn enough that the class presents a challenge, but it’s not too much that it’s hard to memorize the dances.Alday, who has taken the class three times, feels she has learned something new each semester.“They recycle some of the dances, but there’s still a lot that are new to me,” she said.Rizzo said though the class takes place on Friday afternoon, she always looks forward to attending it.“Normally I’m so exhausted that I want to take a nap and not go to class, but the second I step into class and the music starts, I start laughing, smiling and having fun with all my friends, she said. “I leave the class feeling 20 times better than I did coming in, and it’s refreshing.”The Grand Ball is Thursday, at St. Paul’s Memorial United Methodist Church in South Bend, and it is open for students and the public to attend.last_img read more

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Watch a Sneak Peek of Audra McDonald in HBO’s Lady Day

first_imgAudra McDonald Get your DVR ready! Audra McDonald’s Tony-winning performance in Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill will air on HBO on March 12, and we now have a long sneak peek of her star turn in the screen adaptation. Check out below as Mama Broadway appears as Billie Holiday singing “God Bless The Child.” Those lucky enough to be across the pond this summer will be able to catch McDonald reprising her performance as the legendary singer in the West End; before that, the six-time Tony winner is set to headline Shuffle Along on Broadway. View Commentslast_img read more

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Young Scholars Program

first_imgThe University of Georgia is looking for high school students, ages 16 and older, who are looking for hands-on research experience. The UGA Young Scholars Program (YSP) is a paid, six-week summer research internship in agricultural, food and environmental sciences.Organized by the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, selected students work 30 hours a week on the UGA Athens, Griffin or Tifton Campus and are actively engaged in research.The online application for the program closes Tuesday, Jan. 31, and in-person interviews for finalists will follow. Selected interns will be notified by April 1, and the program will run from June 5 to July 14.Alexandria Maddox, now a first-year student at UGA studying biological science, participated in the program and conducted research under Associate Professor Kerry Oliver in the UGA entomology department. She plans to attend medical school and become a gynecologist.“This was the opportunity of a lifetime,” Maddox said. “I didn’t know that even the smallest things on earth can have such a large effect on our environment. Biology is an amazing subject.”Young Scholars averages about 75 internship slots each summer.The program began on the UGA Griffin Campus in 1989 and was originally intended to provide a collegiate experience to students who were not planning to attend college.In 2000, the program expanded its scope and reach by selecting students ready to engage in real-world research and matching them to projects of potential interest. Because of this experience, many Young Scholars continue their research careers through the college’s undergraduate research program while attending UGA .For more information about Young Scholars, visit www.ysp.caes.uga.edu or contact Victoria David, director of the CAES Office of Diversity Affairs and the Young Scholars Program, at [email protected] or 706-542-8826.last_img read more

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School Official from Patchogue Admits to Child Porn

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 54-year-old former Long Island high school coach and administrator has admitted to downloading child pornography videos off the Internet onto a computer at his Patchogue home.At Central Islip federal court on Wednesday,Kevin Barry O’Connell pleaded guilty to receiving child pornography.“Charged by [his] profession with caring for children, the defendant instead acted to foster their victimization by receiving numerous images of the abuse of children,” said Kelly Currie, acting U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York.Prosecutors said O’Connell downloaded video files of the rape and abuse of children as young as 8 years old, which he kept on thumb drives that investigators found hidden in a jacket pocket while executing a search warrant of his home in 2012.Upon his arrest, O’Connell was suspended from his employment as an assistant superintendent for secondary education in the Roosevelt Union Free School District. He had previously served as the principal of Bellport Senior High School, assistant principal at Walter G. O’Connell Copiague and was varsity baseball coach at William Floyd High School from 1990 to 2001.He faces up to 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine when he is sentenced.last_img read more

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Network safeguards at your credit union

first_img 17SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Keeping pace with network security is aiming at a moving target, suggests Jim Benlein, CISA, CISM, CRISC, of KGS Consulting, LLC. The hardware, software, and monitoring processes many credit unions have in place to protect their systems have become more sophisticated—but so have the threats to those systems.“Probably the biggest security issue credit unions face today is with people, not with technology,” Benlein says. He cites high-profile breaches grabbing headlines in recent months, including hacks of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management and Milan-based Hacking Team databases.“When they dig down into how the bad guys got access to those systems, the likely culprit was users not using a strong password or opening a link in a phishing email,” he notes. “There are a lot of technology solutions at work to help credit unions secure their networks, but if employees inadvertently open an email with malware attached to it or go to a site and enter something they shouldn’t, that’s a difficult risk for companies to get a handle on.”Thus, education for employees and members on their roles in heading off security breaches and protecting sensitive data remain an essential component of fraud prevention. In many cases, members may be the first to spot signs of a breach, when they see and report unauthorized transactions in their account records, Benlein says. continue reading »last_img read more

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The risks and rewards of subprime auto lending

first_img 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Owning a reliable vehicle is both a basic necessity for most Americans and a concrete representation of their financial well-being.The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau identifies four elements of financial well-being:• Control over routine finances;• Capacity to absorb a financial shock;• Ability to stay on track to meet financial goals; and• Freedom to make choices that allow one to enjoy life.Good jobs paying good wages allow people to achieve those aims. And in many cases, access to fairly priced car loans makes getting to and from those jobs possible.Credit unions can help members in subprime credit tiers take giant steps toward achieving financial well-being. Especially for members with once-prime credit who were bumped into subprime territory by the Great Recession, qualifying for an affordable vehicle loan offers the opportunity to prove that their repayment habits have changed.At the same time, serving the subprime auto lending market can provide credit unions with a reliable revenue stream when that portfolio is managed carefully. continue reading »last_img read more

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