Historic District Home Saved From Demolition

first_imgThis Edwardian-era home in the Historic District will remain, at least for now, after a Zoning Board decision. By MADDY VITALEIn a move that saves a home that has stood on Wesley Avenue in Ocean City for more than a century, the Zoning Board upheld a decision to deny a demolition permit sought by its owners.The empty home at 615 Wesley Avenue is in the heart of the city’s Historic District, an area that roughly stretches between Third and Eighth streets and Central and Ocean avenues.  Over the years, it fell into disrepair, the current owners, a group called RJGVB LLC of Shippensburg, Pa., wanted to tear it down to make way for a duplex.However, the city’s Historical Preservation Commission felt that the home, dating back to 1902, had historical significance and should be preserved and the Zoning Board agreed in its decision via Zoom on Wednesday.“That house stands as much as the way it was when it was built,” said John Loeper, chairman of the Historic Preservation Commission, in an interview Thursday. “It would be a shame to lose a house like that in the Historic District.”The four-story home, which at one time was a bed and breakfast, is in need of repair and neither side has disputed that.The outside reflects neglect from its exterior to the overgrown yard and dilapidated fence.The property is overgrown and the home needs rehabilitation to bring it back to its original splendor.Despite the need for some TLC, Loeper emphasized that the home can and should be saved.“It is capable of being rehabbed and hopefully a new owner will come through and purchase it and do the right thing for the house, rather than demolish it because of neglect,” Loeper added.On Sept. 1, the Historic Preservation Commission, which approves demolition, new construction or rehabilitation projects within the district, denied the property owner’s request to knock down the home. The city’s administrative officer also refused a demolition permit the following month.Attorney for the applicant, Avery Teitler, could not be reached for comment. However, he argued that the home had mold and other serious physical and structural problems, while architect for property owners, George Wray Thomas, stated that the home has been altered dramatically through the years, limiting its historical significance.The five-bedroom, 4.5 bath home on the market for $999,000 is more than 5,250 square feet of space, according to real estate records.last_img read more

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Warsaw man wanted on warrant arrested Sunday morning

first_img Pinterest WhatsApp IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Pinterest Google+ Twitter Previous articleWhitmer doubles the state’s vaccine goalNext articleTippecanoe woman killed in crash near Burket Nick Deranek Warsaw man wanted on warrant arrested Sunday morning Google+ Facebook By Nick Deranek – March 31, 2021 0 280 Twitter Facebook WhatsApp (“Cuffs4” by banspy, Attribution 2.0 Generic) A Warsaw man, who was the suspect of multiple criminal investigations and had an active Kosciusko County arrest warrant was taken into custody on Sunday morning.The Kosciusko County Sheriff’s Office says an officer saw a man matching the description of 49-year old Scotty Van Hawk riding in a vehicle along State Road 15 around 11:30 AM. As police attempted a traffic stop near the intersection of County Road 350 North and 100 East (Husky Trail), Van Hawk fled on foot to his property nearby.Police say they made multiple attempts to get Van Hawk to exit his property, but he would not comply. That’s when the Kosciusko County Sheriff’s Special Operations Group, formerly SWAT, entered the home and apprehended Van Hawk without incident.Van Hawk was taken to the Kosciusko County Jail facing multiple counts on two felony stalking charges including invasion of privacy and intimidation, along with resisting law enforcement.last_img read more

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Australian “One-Person Band” Tash Sultana Releases Incredible Debut Album, ‘Flow State’ [Listen]

first_imgToday, enigmatic Australian “one-person band” Tash Sultana has released their debut studio album, Flow State, via Mom + Pop/Lonely Lands Records.The multi-talented 23-year-old musician played all 15 instruments heard on the record, from guitars, bass and drums to piano, saxophone, and flute. All that skilled musicianship is buoyed Tash’s uniquely dream-like vocals, which can evoke comparisons to Macy Gray, Norah Jones, Christina Aguilera, Chris Martin, and more, depending on the song, while still managing to sound wholly new and original. Flow State moves deftly through a variety of styles and genres, from laid-back surf jams to Lenny Kravitz-style fuzz rock and everything in between, fully showcasing Sultana’s broad spectrum of musical abilities. Even in the wake of enormous hype, Flow State assures what those in the know have been hip to for some time now: Tash Sultana is going to be one of the next big stars. Count on it.You can listen to Sultana’s debut album, Flow State, below via Spotify:Tash Sultana – Flow State – Full AlbumYou can also watch Tash’s recently released music video for Flow State track “Salvation” below:Tash Sultana – “Salvation” (Official Video)[Video: Tash Sultana]Tash Sultana will hit the road in support of Flow State with a North American tour this fall. For a full list of their upcoming tour dates, head to their website.Tash Sultana Flow State Tracklist:01. Seed (Intro)02. Big Smoke03. Cigarettes04. Murder to the Mind05. Seven06. Salvation07. Pink Moon08. Mellow Marmalade09. Harvest Love10. Mystik11. Free Mind12. Blackbird13. OutroView Tracklist[H/T Consequence of Sound]last_img read more

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A new platform for discovering antibiotics

first_imgHarvard researchers have created a greatly simplified platform for discovering antibiotics that may help solve the rising crisis of resistance to such helpful drugs.In a study just published in the journal Nature, Andrew G. Myers and colleagues describe “a platform where we assemble eight (chemical) building blocks by a simple process to make macrolide antibiotics” without using erythromycin, the original macrolide antibiotic, and the drug upon which all others in the class have been based since the early 1950s. Erythromycin, which was discovered in a soil sample from the Philippines in 1949, has been on the market as a drug since 1953.“For 60 years, chemists have been very, very creative, finding clever ways to ‘decorate’ this molecule, making changes around its periphery to produce antibiotics that are safer, more effective, and overcome the resistance bacteria have developed,” said Myers, Amory Houghton Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology in Harvard’s Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology. “That process is semisynthesis, modifying the naturally occurring substance.”In contrast, the process described in the Nature study involves using “eight industrial chemicals, or substances derived from them,” Myers said, manipulating them in various combinations and then testing the products against panels of disease-causing bacteria. This allows for “new compounds in fewer steps than was previously possible.”Ian H. Seipel, who was a postdoctoral fellow in Myers’ lab and now is at the School of Pharmacy at the University of California, San Francisco, and Ziyang Zhang, a Myers postdoctoral fellow, are first authors on the report.For a host of reasons, from the difficulty of developing antibiotics to the relatively low return on investment they offer, by 2013 the number of international pharmaceutical companies developing antibiotics had dwindled to four. In addition, in each five-year period from 1983 through 2007, the number of new antibiotics approved for use in the United States decreased, from 16 at the beginning of that period to only five by its end.One thing that has complicated antibiotic development is federal agencies’ perceived reluctance to fund the research. In fact, Myers said, his new antibiotic development system would have been impossible without support from a Harvard alumnus and his wife who are interested in science, and Harvard’s Blavatnik Biomedical Accelerator.“I was making a presentation to a group of visiting alumni interested in science, and one, Alastair Mactaggart, asked me about funding. I told him I had no funding, because at that time we didn’t, and he followed me back to my office and said, ‘This is ridiculous: We have to do something about this.’” Myers said that without the support of Mactaggart and his wife, Celine, and the Gustavus and Louise Pfeiffer Research Foundation, the new platform would not exist. “And the Blavatnik accelerator funding was also hugely important,” he addedThe Blavatnik Biomedical Accelerator awarded funding to Myers’ project in 2013, enabling synthesis and testing of compounds. In 2015, with support from Harvard’s Office of Technology Development, Myers founded Macrolide Pharmaceuticals, which has licensed the synthesis platform and aims to commercialize novel antibiotics for serious infections.“One of the things that’s quite encouraging about the data in our paper is that some of the structures we’ve made are active against clinical bacterial strains that are resistant to every known macrolide,” Myers said. In fact, he added, two of the 350 compounds reported on in the Nature paper have, in initial testing, shown efficacy against a bacterium that had become resistant to vancomycin, “which is known as the antibiotic of last resort. And if you have a bug that’s resistant to vancomycin, you’re in trouble,” Myers added.“This is an early effort,” Myers said of his lab’s work with the new drug-development system. “We have a lot of work ahead of us.” Some of the 350 compounds reported on in the paper will undergo more extensive testing to evaluate their potential as candidate drugs.Myers cautioned that the road from drug candidate to treatment at the bedside is long, arduous, and expensive. First comes the initial identification of possible compounds.“Microbiologists evaluate those against panels of bacteria,” said Myers. “Hopefully your panels contain clinically relevant strains that are found in hospitals.” If an effective compound is found, it must be advanced. First researchers make sure it’s not toxic to human cells in the lab; then they see how stable it is in human plasma; next come animal studies, typically in rodents to see if it can cure infection. And then come the three phases of human studies.“I said to a friend the other day that I’m really pleased this paper is out,” Myers said. “My students worked unbelievably hard to make this happen. But if this is where this ends, I won’t be satisfied. Our objective from day one was to have a drug in the clinic.”last_img read more

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Growing skills and vegetables

first_imgLooking over the tomato, okra, cucumber, squash and pepper plants, Joel Cooper is proud. The 46-year-old recovering addict is happy, too, to get his life back on track and for the opportunity to help others like him eat and live a little better.Cooper, and the other men who rely on the Atlanta Mission for food, will soon be eating fresh produce they’ve grown at the place they call their temporary home.Vegetables aren’t calorie high“Unfortunately, most of the food that’s donated to the mission is high-calorie breads and pastries,” Cooper said, rubbing his stomach. “I’m grateful, but I didn’t get this from eating vegetables.”Cooper says the garden keeps him busy and gives him a reason to be outside. “I’m actually enjoying watering the plants and pulling weeds,” he said. “And it’s a good feeling knowing and seeing that I’m giving back to the mission and helping feed the men in my program as well as the homeless that come to the mission to eat.”After watering the plants and checking them for diseases and insects, the men often take their morning coffee on a bench in the garden.Learning a marketable skillThe garden isn’t just growing fresh vegetables for the mission’s kitchen, said Louise Estabrook, the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent in Fulton County. It’s teaching the men a new skill and providing them “horticultural” therapy. “The men now have new skill sets in agriculture and gardening,” Estabrook said. “They’ve been responsible for caring for other living things, and they’ve been able to connect with nature in the middle of a busy cityscape.”Adjacent to the mission and off Ivan Allen Boulevard in the heart of Atlanta, the garden plot is on loan from Skanska, a project development and construction company. Home Depot donated plants. UGA Extension agents from Fulton County taught the men how to grow the vegetables. Private donations paid for other gardening supplies.Feeding the homelessMost community gardens Estabrook works with involve individuals renting plots, working the plots and personally reaping the benefits. The Atlanta Mission garden, she said, has a greater common cause. “They are helping each other, learning and sharing and have found a point of united pride,” she said. “I feel grateful for the tiny role I had in moving this project forward.”Michael Wyatt of Powder Springs, a mission resident and the garden’s foreman, has rekindled his passion for gardening. “My grandfather had a 26-acre farm and a produce stand at the end of the road,” he said. “And my Dad had a three-acre garden that I helped out with. I love gardening.“My favorite part is seeing the blossoms come on the tomato and pepper plants and knowing they will soon turn to fruit, and seeing the faces of the guys in the kitchen when we take them fresh herbs,” said Wyatt, who worked in the kitchen before leading the garden project. Wyatt proudly reports that the garden is environmentally-friendly. “We don’t use any chemical fertilizers or pesticides,” he said.The garden has been an educational venture for Estabrook, too. “I’ve learned that with enough hands, we can lift each other,” she said. “And gardening and caring for the earth is a common denominator amongst us all.”last_img read more

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New scholarship at Champlain College celebrates 200 years of teaching by Accounting faculty

first_imgOn the evening of Tuesday, May 8, Champlain College announced the launch of an Accounting Excellence Scholarship Fund. The new endowment fund celebrates decades of teaching excellence by Champlains distinguished Accounting faculty.The fund will annually support two Accounting students who demonstrate both academic merit and financial need. Alumni and community members have rallied in support of the fund, placing it well on its way to raising an initial goal of $100,000 for the permanent endowment.Nearly 2,000 of Champlain’s Accounting graduates have benefited from the experience and mentoring of the Colleges seven current Accounting faculty who have recently surpassed a combined total of 200 years of service: Walt Luchini (39 years), Champ Soncrant (36 years), Eadie Templin (31 years), Thane Butt (26 years), Mitch Thibault (26 years), Nancy Wells (24 years) and David Mona (22 years). Their impact is noticeable when you walk into Vermont accounting firms, captive insurance firms and a variety of business organizations and take note of the saturation of Champlain Accounting graduates.”This scholarship extends the legacy of these Accounting faculty members in perpetuity,” said Champlain College President David F. Finney. “These individuals help define the caliber of the education for which Champlain is renowned: a student-centered experience made relevant by the real-world lessons of their professors.”At the event, President Finney announced that former Champlain Trustee Larry Walsh and his spouse Connie Walsh–both 1966 graduates of the College–have made a challenge gift for the scholarship fund. They will match up to $10,000 for gifts received in May. Larry Walsh has known Accounting professors Walt Luchini and Mitch Thibault since their grade school days in Burlington.Molly Lambert, president of the Vermont Captive Insurance Association, spoke at the Accounting Excellence event, as did Dr. Wayne Cunningham, the dean of Champlains Division of Business.Accounting is a rapidly growing field in today’s economy, and each year Champlain’s Accounting students are wooed by the regions businesses and firms. Students typically land a job by December of their senior year–some deciding between two and three offers.The College keeps its Accounting curriculum up to date by modifying and adding courses most relevant to the times. For example, a popular new course has been Forensic Accounting, where students learn fraud examination techniques, interview techniques, rules of evidence relating to internal control methodology, asset misappropriation and financial statement misrepresentation. Students explore rules of evidence as they relate to several different fraudulent activities including money laundering, cash skimming and embezzlement.Visit www.champlain.edu/portals/alumni/(link is external) for more information on the faculty members and the Accounting Excellence Scholarship Fund.last_img read more

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Brazilian and Argentine Armies Train Together, Strengthen Ties

first_img Waging virtual battles By Dialogo January 20, 2016 Guarani will involve Troops from the 1st Mechanized Cavalry Brigade, 3rd Army Division, from Santiago, Rio Grande do Sul, and Argentine service members from the 12th Mountain Brigade, located in Posadas, province of Misiones. Additionally, operation Saci-Duende will bring together Paratroopers from Brazil and Argentina with jumps in both countries in 2016. Operation Yaguareté was held November 2nd-5th, and consisted of joint exercises in air transport operations in the Argentine province of Buenos Aires. Sixty Brazilian service members from the 12th Light Infantry Brigade, from Caçapava (São Paulo) participated along with Argentine Troops from the 601st Anti-Aircraft Artillery Group, Third Army Division from Mar del Plata, province of Buenos Aires, according to the Brazilian Army Social Communications Center. Military officials from the two countries had agreed to the operation during a Bilateral Conference of the Argentine and Brazilian General Staffs. For the training, Argentina sent representatives from the “General Justo José de Urquiza” Second Armored Brigade, under the First Army Division located in Paraná, in the province of Entre Ríos. The Second Mechanized Cavalry Brigade (BdaCMec) in Uruguaiana, under the Third Army Division, participated on behalf of the EB. The operation was conducted in a simulated warfare environment at the Center for Applied Simulations at Command Posts (CAS-PC, for its Portuguese acronym) in Santa Maria, according to Major General Carlos Jorge Jorge da Costa , BdaCMec Commanding Officer. Strengthening cooperative ties While the operation conducted training in Uruguaiana (November 16th-17th; 20th) and in Santa Maria (November 18th-19th), the closing ceremony was held on the countries’ border, where Military officers crossed the Uruguaiana-Paso de los Libres International Bridge over the Uruguay River. CAS-PC hosted the simulations, performed by Combater software, and verified the results. “The group demonstrated initiative and flexibility in adapting to joint planning processes, leading to a harmonious work environment targeting correct solutions to the simulated Military problem,” he said. Prior to the operation, one Colonel from the EB and one from the Argentine Army visited the center for five days to test the software. The Combater software is considered a tool and not the final goal of the ongoing mission, according to the CAS-PC Coordination Office. The cooperative ties between the two Armed Forces is reflected in the growing number of joint exercises. In addition to the third iteration of Hermandad, the Guarani Exercise will be held in Argentina from October 10th-23rd. “Cooperation between our forces is becoming gradually and sustainably closer,” Brig. Gen. Booth said. Col. Bochi Luz was one of the CMS coordinators for Operation Hermandad, which was conducted November 16th-20th by Brazilian Army (EB) in Santa Maria and Uruguaiana, sites near the border with Argentina. Hermandad primarily involved 15 officers from each force to coordinate planning and conduct a Command Post Exercise for a Combined General Command for a Large Combat Unit under an Army Division. In addition to its 15 officers, 30 Brazilian Sergeants also participated in the operation. “The goal is to have firm ties uniting us, with cooperation and friendship between the two Armies, in addition to a mutual understanding of the procedures, methods and techniques each side employs,” Maj. Gen. Jorge da Costa stated. Argentine Brigadier General Gustavo Fernando Booth, commanding officer of the Second Armored Brigade, added, “Our goal is also to increase our professional and doctrinal knowledge to contribute to the interoperability between the two Armies.” The Training and Evaluation Center, which is in the Brazilian city of Santa Maria in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, and included within CAS-PC, is a strategic place to expand the number of multinational joint exercises with nations in South America and outside the region, Col. Bochi Luz added. “It really is a laboratory for lessons learned. In this regard, a virtual simulation can be a powerful ally.” I believe that these joint exercises among the two countries strengthen the bond between the two nations and, at the same time, avoids divisive maneuvers by other countries to dominate the Southern Cone. It also serves to negate the maxim that goes: “Weapons attract attacks and distrust attracts offense.” Congratulations to the two Militaries. Congratulations to the commanding officers! We need to strengthen military ties with Argentina now more than ever so that we may always have a South America free of the Bolivarians. I agree with the joint exercises between Argentina and Brazil because it increases ties of camaraderie and shared operations between both armies. These trainings should be held more often.center_img “[The technologies that CAS-PC has at its disposal] allow for profound training and preparation of Troops at a lower cost that would be required for a training operation on the ground,” said Brig. Gen. Booth, adding that Argentina has a simulation center called Virtual Battle, at Campo de Maio in Buenos Aires. “The center can almost constantly provide training for troops all year long.” The Hermandad operation did not require Troops to conduct field exercises or use combat equipment. Instead, participating Soldiers waged virtual battle on computer screens at the CAS-PC in Santa Maria. The use of Combater software installed in its facilities allows for a more credible evaluation of the results of the maneuvers employed by the General Command, according to Maj. Gen. Da Costa. Command officers from the two Armed Forces came up with the initial ideas for Hermandad in 2006, Maj. Gen. Jorge da Costa explained. The first iteration occurred in November 2014 in Paraná, Argentina. Armed Forces authorities intend on conducting this operation annually, with Military officials planning on holding the 2016 edition at the Entre Ríos unit, but the date has yet to be determined. “In Hermandad, the two Armies executed a joint operation against a fictitious common enemy,” explained the CAS-PC Coordination Office, which has received delegations from Uruguay, Chile, Colombia, and Military Attachés from other countries. “There is an interest in seeing how we use this simulation tool, our plans, and the number of Troops we intend to train, in addition to technical and pedagogical details about how it works.” During the operation, service members engaged in a number of exercises involving the gathering of intelligence, Troop mobilization, logistics, operational actions and civilian matters, according to Brig. Gen. Booth. “We simulated the actions of a Combined General Command for a Large Armored Unit undertaking a broad-spectrum defensive operation with planning from the statement of directives from the commanding officer (mission announcement) through final decision. Future exercises “An international atmosphere requires militaries to increase their capabilities to join deployed forces and interact in a cooperative environment with other nations,” said Colonel Newton Cleo Bochi Luz, chief of the Operations Coordination Center for the Brazilian Southern Military Command (CMS), which is headquartered in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul. “An important element of creating cooperation and regional stability is having forces that are familiar with each other.” Building upon the success of two previous joint exercises, Operations Yaguareté and Hermandad, service members from Argentina and Brazil are scheduled to engage in two more joint training operations in 2016, with the aim of strengthening the cooperative ties between the two Militaries. “The high level of training provided by Hermandad makes it possible for the two Militaries to hold discussions, get to know each other, and work within the different cultures,” Col. Bochi Luz said. “The exercises establish common parameters to resolve possible future necessities to employ the two forces, primarily to protect civilians, for humanitarian aid, defense, and the protection of natural resources,” Brig. Gen. Booth added. “Hermandad was a success. Because each country has hosted one year, we are cementing our bases to be able to fulfill our objectives.” last_img read more

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Shoreline Federal Credit Union fraud case: Employees recount betrayal

first_imgEmployees and board members wept in disbelief and anger as they expressed the heart-breaking betrayal they felt after learning the longtime CEO they trusted and admired stole more than $1.9 million from their credit union’s vault and stuffed the cash in her purse 433 separate times over 17 years.Kathryn Sue Simmerman, the former manager of the $17.2 million Shoreline Federal Credit Union, was sentenced to six and a half years in federal prison by U.S. District Court Judge Robert Holmes Bell in Grand Rapids, Mich., Monday. He also ordered her to pay $1.9 million in restitution. continue reading » 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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3 easy ways to kill your brand

first_img 15SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Details Anyone who has ever spent a morning at the beach building a sand castle knows it’s a lot easier to destroy than create. The tide comes in (or some jerk walks through it) and it’s gone. Your brand is similar. It can take years to build a brand, but you can destroy it in an instant if you’re not careful. Here are a few easy ways you can kill your brand.Talk is cheap: Your ads and marketing can make promises, but to keep your members coming back, you’ll need to actually deliver on them. Lots of companies fail to deliver, so don’t be afraid to be different. When you’re consistent and come through, you’re keeping your members’ money out of your competitor’s pockets.Take your eye off the ball: Treat your members right. This builds loyalty. If you stray from this, you’ll regret it. What might make sense now, might cost you in the long run. If you want members to keep coming back, give them a reason to. They are your most important asset, and should be treated as such. Strive every day to show your members how valuable you can be when it comes to their personal finances.Disappear: Marketing is everywhere your members look. If you disappear from their radar, they’ll surely see other viable options. Use your social channels to show your members what you stand for and the help you can provide. Your social media presence gives you a chance to spread your message to the masses. Create sharable content that your members can send to their friends and family. Don’t miss the amazing opportunity that social media provides.last_img read more

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TIP charters are tipping points towards growth

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » The NCUA’s TIP (Trade, Industry or Profession) charter offers credit unions the opportunity to serve a highly specific, narrowly defined group. Rules surrounding the charter are strict, stating this group must share a common bond by virtue of producing similar products, providing similar services or participating in the same type of business, thus TIP Charter is available only to single common bond credit unions.In general, excluding credit unions operating in multiple states or nationally, a geographic limitation is required for the charter. This usually corresponds to an institution’s current or planned operational area.Yet despite such restrictions, the TIP Charter also presents an intriguing pathway to field of membership expansion.The TIP Charter was introduced in 2003, and since then has been implemented by many institutions of varying sizes and scopes. CUCollaborate spoke with representatives of three such credit unions to better understand their experience.last_img read more

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