Gov’t Ready to Accept Proposals for Integrated Resorts

first_imgMinster of Finance and Planning, Dr. the Hon. Peter Phillips, says there is no need for additional regulations before the Requests for Proposals (RFPs) are issued for the development of integrated resorts. He said that the regulations that have been promulgated “are all that is needed to issue the RFPs.” Dr. Phillips was speaking as he closed the 2013/2014 Budget debate on May 1 in the House of Representatives. The integrated resorts development, of which casino gaming will be one component, will provide a mix of tourism facilities, including but not limited to hotels, villas, and attractions, sporting facilities, service centres and shopping centres. The Finance Minister announced on April 18 that the Government will begin accepting bids for the construction of integrated resorts under the recently gazetted Casino Games Regulation 2012, as of June 1. The period for receipt of requests and completed applications will be from June 1 to September 30, 2013. The Casino Gaming Act was passed by both the Upper and Lower Houses of Parliament in 2010. Dr. Phillips said the approved integrated resort developments are the means by which the Government proposes to substantially grow the hotel sector with accompanying casinos, entertainment, banqueting and other facilities. He noted that the model, which the government is using, is based on that introduced by Singapore, which is inclusive of hotels, restaurants, shopping and convention space, with casinos, and has led to a “phenomenal growth in tourism”. The Minister said that Singapore now earns more from its casino floors than Las Vegas in the United States. Local regulations also require that the integrated resort development, when completed, will comprise one or more hotels, providinglast_img read more

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There Are No Easy Matches In Womens Tennis Anymore

WIMBLEDON, England — No one has any idea which of the four semifinalists will win the women’s singles title at Wimbledon on Saturday. But there is one prediction you can make with confidence: The remaining matches will be close, hard-fought contests that could easily last three sets.Women’s tennis matches keep getting longer and more grueling. Since the 2014 Australian Open, the four Grand Slams — including this year’s Wimbledon, which is not yet complete — have averaged 40.9 three-set women’s matches per tournament. That’s up from an average of 36.8 between 1988 and 2013. Last month’s French Open saw 46 women’s matches go the distance, which was the most ever at Roland Garros and tied for the fourth-highest tally at any Slam since 1988, according to the WTA. So far this Wimbledon, there have been 43 three-setters, with three matches left to play. One more would put this year’s competition in a three-way tie for the most three-set matches at Wimbledon since 1988 — the 2011 and 2008 tournaments each saw 44. Tennis’s current crop of women are, as a group, extremely talented but frequently flawed players, which means anyone can win almost any match. This is especially true while Serena Williams, the sport’s most dominant player, is off the circuit during her pregnancy. For evidence that anyone can win, look no further than last month’s French Open, where an unseeded 20-year-old — Jelena Ostapenko, who at the time was ranked 47th in the world — took home the trophy. Five of her seven matches there lasted three sets, including the semifinal and final. In the final, Ostapenko trailed by a set and 3-0 before charging to victory.Agnieszka Radwanska, seeded 9th at Wimbledon, saved two match points in the second round and beat Christina McHale, an unseeded American, in three sets. She needed three sets in the next round too, against Timea Bacsinszky, seeded 19th. Radwanska, who became a professional in 2005, said that today’s tennis is far more tense than it was in the past.“A couple of years ago, those first two rounds when you didn’t play against seeded players, it was easy,” Radwanska said. “You don’t have to play 100 percent and you’re gonna win. Obviously it’s not gonna happen anymore in tennis right now. You can play … those players that you really don’t want to play in the first round, and that’s why I think we can also see a lot of upsets in early rounds.”In men’s tennis, the late rounds of many tournaments remain compelling — it’s hard to be bored when greats like Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic, Andy Murray and Stan Wawrinka are duking it out — but in early rounds, the excitement has fizzled. The men’s side rarely sees any early upsets, and players are more likely to retire in the middle of matches; nine men bowed out during the first three rounds at Wimbledon this year, compared to only two women. We don’t yet know if the women will have any 30-something superstars in the final this year, but the women’s matches are competitive and entertaining from the first round to the last. CoCo Vandeweghe, an American currently ranked 25th, described the men’s field as “top-heavy” compared to the women’s side.“In the women’s game, as you’ll see, there is more upsets along the way with the seeded players, because I think there is more depth in the 20s to 30s to 40s,” she said. “I think there is some very solid depth of players that can make an impact against a top player. I mean, I’m an example of that myself.”British star Johanna Konta says that anything can happen and happen quickly. She has won three three-set matches so far, including one that required 18 games in the third set. She said she worries about everyone she faces.“I don’t underestimate any opponents,” she said. “I respect each and every opponent that I’m playing because I’m fully aware of the challenges that they will bring.”Of course, no one will underestimate Konta’s next opponent. She plays five-time Wimbledon champion Venus Williams in the semifinals on Thursday. read more

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Can Utahs NewLook Offense Lead The Pac12 Back To The Playoff

And it’s working. Since 2005, only once has Utah had a more efficient start to the season offensively. Trailing only Mike Leach’s perennially magnificent Air Raid at Washington State, Ludwig oversees the conference’s second-best offense, which ranks in the top 25 nationally in expected points added on passes a season after it finished 96th. If maintained, the Utes’ 2.59 points per drive would be their best mark since 2008, when they went undefeated.Starting quarterback Tyler Huntley reportedly spent the offseason packing on 25 pounds. Armed with a new physique, the senior leads the country in adjusted completion percentage (90), ranks fifth in yards per pass attempt (11.2) and is 12th in QBR (85.4). He hasn’t thrown an interception or been sacked.4Utah is the only Power Five team to not have allowed a sack. He has help in the backfield from Zack Moss, who is coming off consecutive 1,000-yard campaigns. Moss has accumulated more yards after first contact this season than all but two players in college football and will likely leave as the school’s all-time leading rusher. Utah has slowed its offense way downThe Utah Utes vs. Pac-12 average in four metrics, for the 2019 season Time of possession per play34 seconds26 seconds Source: ESPN STATS & INFORMATION GROUP Under-center rate43%15% The most realistic shot for the “Conference of Champions” to break its College Football Playoff drought rests on the shoulders of one of its newest and most unproven members. It falls on a coach who traditionally oversees .500 ball once the regular season passes the midway point and on a quarterback whose last two seasons have been derailed by upper-body injuries.And with the Pac-12 Conference’s preeminent powers having already lost, Utah is perhaps the last team standing between the conference and a third consecutive season of missing the playoff.But contrary to what the school’s trophy case might indicate, Utah is now more than just a powerhouse on the slopes. The Utes’ football team has made a convincing case to be taken seriously so far this season: They have three wins, with each decided by at least three possessions.1Starting QB Tyler Huntley has only thrown two fourth-quarter passes this season. Kyle Whittingham’s 15th full season at the helm in Salt Lake City opened with unprecedented expectations: They were ranked in the preseason top 15 for the first time, picked by the media and oddsmakers to win the Pac-12 and even deemed a national title contender by the lovably eccentric Lee Corso. And the prognostications were for good reason, too: Utah returns more than half of its starters on each side of the ball and features arguably the best defensive line in the nation. As Stanford coach David Shaw candidly put it at Pac-12 Football Media Day, “I think it’s great they’re not on the schedule for us this year.”The program’s trajectory has reached an inflection point in recent years. From 1950 through 2013, Utah managed to crack the Associated Press Top 25 poll in just seven seasons. This year marks the sixth consecutive that the Utes have barreled into the top 20.Since joining the Pac-12 eight years ago, the Utes have finished each season with a defense more efficient than its offense.2According to ESPN’s measurement, which is based on the point contributions of each unit to the team’s scoring margin. The average is around 50 for each unit. The team’s average defensive efficiency over that time (73.3) grades out as tops among all defenses in the conference, while its offense (46.9) grades out as the second worst. This season, the two are within 2 points of each other, as the Utes feature a smashmouth offense that has vaulted the program onto the national scene.In a conference marketed by speed and governed by spread offensive principles, Utah has been as deliberate as it gets. That’s the work of offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach Andy Ludwig, who returned to Salt Lake City this offseason after previously serving in the former role from 2005 to 2008.3 Ludwig shepherded the Utes to a 13-0 record and a Sugar Bowl victory the last time he called the plays. Like many coordinators, Ludwig adapts his system to the personnel on hand. This season, that flexibility has arguably produced the kind of offense that, according to Utah backup quarterback Jason Shelley, will “smash you right in the face.”Last season, Utah huddled on just 60.7 percent of snaps. Two seasons ago, only 27.5 percent of offensive plays involved that traditional gathering. But this year, Ludwig has the Utes huddling before 98.4 percent of plays, a rate outpaced by only a handful of teams. The Pac-12 averages a huddle rate of 52.2 percent, with six teams opting to huddle on less than 40 percent of snaps. In turn, Utah has gone almost entirely under center. While Arizona, Oregon and Washington State have used just two under-center snaps this season combined, Utah has racked up 78. By average time of possession per play and per drive, this is easily Utah’s slowest offensive cadence in at least 15 years — and it’s on pace to be the slowest Pac-12 offense over that same stretch. MetricUtahPac-12 average Time of possession per drive3:122:30 Huddle percentage98%52% These team performances have come via an abridged playbook. “Ludwig has done a very good job of just keeping things really basic,” Moss said after the Utes thrashed Idaho State. “We’ve just been running the first couple installs we did going into this year. If you can win with your basic stuff, that’s really good for your offense.”Friday’s matchup at USC presents an opportunity for the Utes to allay fears that the moment will grow too big for them. It would mark a historic victory for Utah, which hasn’t beaten the Trojans in Los Angeles since 1916 (though in only nine attempts). Since arriving in the Pac-12 in 2011, Utah has never shown the flash of Oregon or the imagination of Washington State. It has even found itself in the shadow of Stanford, another program that bucks conference norms behind a conservative, play clock-drowning style. So it’s fitting that Utah, a program conventionally known for a stout defensive front, is gunning for contention behind an old face and a new offensive blueprint.Check out our latest college football predictions. read more

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MAGNETIC MEDIA SPONSORS CONCH FESTIVAL

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:conch blowing, conch festival, conch knocking, dudley stokes, erica hammond, magnetic media, mijito contest, royal turks and caicos police force, wwe diva Conch Festival invites Delano Williams to taste in Conch-etition; Gramps Morgan in pre-show concert Nearly 100 Haitian migrants caught by TCI Police Marine division Culture & Heritage Policy/Plan Survey Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 24 Nov 2014 – News Break is a Magnetic Media production… proud sponsors of the 2014 installment of the Turks and Caicos Conch Festival. It’s a no bottle zone at this year’s Conch Festival reminded members of the Royal Turks and Caicos Islands Police Force which is providing security to the event in Blue Hills this weekend. There are expected to be a few celebrity appearances including the TCIs own mascot, Henry the Conch. From abroad: Erica Hammond, a former WWE Diva and a mystery judge. The Conch Festival this year also welcomes a founder of the Jamaican Bobsled team, Dudley ‘Tal’ Stokes with a number of competitions including the Mojito Contest, the Conch Knocking event and Conch Blowing challenge. It is an all afternoon cultural festivity with the competing restaurants set up from noon… Hemingway’s is the 2013 winner and will be there to defend the title… there is also the return of the Home Kitchen cook off. This is the 11th year for the Conch Festival.last_img read more

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