The Dinosaurs That Didn’t Evolve

first_imgEveryone is understandably fascinated by dinosaurs, but we must separate the empirical facts of their nature from evolutionary stories told about them.Currie favor: Renowned dinosaur hunter Philip J. Currie got another new species named after him, says Science Daily. Albertavenator curriei, complete with imaginary feathers,  is very similar to Troodon—so similar, in fact, that researchers had to perform “detailed anatomical and statistical comparisons of the skull bones” to distinguish them. “Both dinosaurs walked on two legs, were covered in feathers, and were about the size of a person,” the article says. No actual feathers are reported in the article.Laura Geggel is even more bold about the imaginary feathers in her report for Live Science, headlining her article, “‘Stalker’ Velociraptor Relative Sported Feathers, Serrated Teeth.” Although she is mighty sporty about those imaginary feathers, details of actual feathers found with the fossil are not provided. The idea makes for a nice story, though: “About 71 million years ago, a feathered dinosaur that was too big to fly rambled through parts of North America, likely using its serrated teeth to gobble down meat and veggies, a new study finds.” Currie is probably happy to hear that his namesake dinosaur ate its veggies.T. rex slow treks: The pendulum has swung back again. Tyrannosaurus rex was fast, like a speedy predator. No, it was slow, like a lazy scavenger. No, it was fast (about the time the Jurassic Park movies came out). Now it is slow again. The slow-runner meme has spread like a seasonal virus through Science Daily, National Geographic and the BBC News. Fox News Science even calls Jurassic Park a ‘lie’—”T. rex couldn’t run fast, scientists say.” NG assures readers that they could have outrun T. rex, since “Cutting-edge simulations suggest the mighty dinosaur wasn’t capable of more than a light jog.” At least that’s what they say today until they change their mind again. None of this has anything to do with evolution.The predator races: Speaking of speed, T. rex shows up in another meme about the physics of predators. In “Why Tyrannosaurus was a slow runner and why the largest are not always the fastest,” Science Daily reports on work by Germans about the limits of speed for large animals. The work was published in Nature Ecology and Evolution, but there’s no mention of evolution in this article; just constraints on how fast an animal of a given mass can run or fly. The BBC News imports Darwin into the story: “Speedy animals like the cheetah have evolved bodies primed to catch prey. They are the optimal size for maximum speed.” It appears that readers will have to wait for the Darwin futureware to arrive, though: “With this refined explanation of why animals move as fast as they do (or don’t), we can expect to gain further insight into how locomotion and ecology has evolved in various groups throughout the history of life.” Insight into why evolution made cheetahs fast and humans slow (and sloths slower still) may have to await further elaboration.Convergence crock: A crocodile had teeth like a T. rex, says the BBC News. So was it becoming one? No, this “top predator in Madagascar 170 million years ago” has dimensions “comparable to those of modern relatives” of its type, the article says. So over 170 million years, crocodiles did not evolve into non-crocodiles. In fact, living salt-water crocodiles reach similar size as this fossil.Hey Judy: Australia celebrates the discovery of a sauropod named Judy, says Phys.org. So did this dinosaur evolve? The article talks about its size, its possible stomach contents and other facts, but doesn’t mention anything evolutionary. “This new specimen will probably prompt more questions than it answers, but it will still provide us with a unique snapshot of the life – and death – of at least one sauropod individual that roamed Australia 95 million years ago.” Even if one accepts the moyboy date, that’s not evolution.Empty promises? An article on Phys.org promises insight into dinosaur evolution: “Paleobiologists make intriguing new discoveries about dinosaur ancestors.” So what’s inside the package? “An international group of researchers has discovered that the most ancient dinosaurs’ ancestors were quadrupedal.” Why is that evolutionary, when many dinosaurs walked on all fours? The article proceeds to tell an old tale about the ancestor of dinosaurs splitting into bird-hipped and lizard-hipped groups. “However, this logical construct was recently upended by the research group, which found a new candidate for an early dinosaur predecessor: Teleocrater rhadinus, whose bone fragments were discovered in Tanzania in the 1930s.” Time to re-write the textbooks:Sterling Nesbitt, assistant professor at Virginia Tech, said that this discovery dramatically changed the current picture of early dinosaur evolution. Judith Skog, program director at the National Science Foundation, added that the research makes everyone rethink their ideas about dinosaur ancestry…. Sennikov added that this research showed the more complex diversity of early archosaurs than had previously been considered. So who is the ancestor of whom? On The Conversation, Richard Butler, one of the discoverers of Teleocrater, tries to put a happy face on the situation. Admittedly, this “Dragon-like fossil discovery could change our view of dinosaur origins,” but he is here to tell you what traits are primitive and which ones shed light on evolution. It takes a special kind of vision to see Darwin in the bones:Teleocrater seems to be highly similar to a number of other reptile species that have been named previously from rocks of similar age in India, Russia and Brazil. Most of these species have been enigmatic and difficult to understand, but our work suggests that together they form a previously unrecognised group of dinosaur cousins. We named this group Aphanosauria, or “hidden lizards”, referring to the fact that these animals have been hiding in plain sight. They had been given scientific names by palaeontologists, but their evolutionary importance for dinosaur origins had not been realised.Do you see the visage of Darwin yet? No? Well, you can trust the experts. They have the training to see his bearded face in the data. That is, they see him in the future.Our work is part of a number of recent discoveries and analyses that suggest that we might have to completely rethink our models of dinosaur origins. Teleocrater raises the possibility that dinosaur ancestors might have been considerably larger than previously thought, slower moving, and quadrupedal rather than bipedal.As so often in palaeontology, sorting through alternative theories about what dinosaur ancestors looked like will probably require additional fossil discoveries. These may come from new fieldwork, but it’s also possible that the answers might already be lying in a museum drawer somewhere, waiting to catch the right palaeontological eye. Let’s just hope it doesn’t take another 80 years.This implies that in 80 years, scientists of the future will have to completely rethink our year-2017 models of dinosaur origins. Evolution marches on.Update 7/31/17: Phys.org discusses the rediscovery of a dinosaur dig site in Australia, where a long-necked sauropod named Austrosaurus, said to be 104 million Darwin Years old, was found in 1932. More rib bones were dug up in 2014-2015. The only statement about evolution is this: “Because of its age, Dr Poropat says Austrosaurus might reveal something about the evolution of other sauropods in Australia.” He can come back when he has something.It is SO tiring to see the dirty tricks evolutionists play with the data, using divination methods on bones to conjure up Darwin. They get away with it because they have ruled all criticism of evolution out of court. Creationists are screaming ‘Foul! Foul!’ behind the soundproof one-way glass, but only the Expelled can see or hear it. Mainstream reporters and Big Science institutions commit Fake Science in the name of Darwin without any fear of being shamed. Their propaganda, repeatedly proved wrong in their own writings, is fed to impressionable students as “science” when it is really Darwin worship.We will continue exposing this propaganda to those not yet brainwashed. Mr. Darwin, tear down this wall! (Visited 656 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Figuring out the proper size of an operating loan

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ag lenders are seeing some new faces coming through the door in 2017.“Many farmers who haven’t needed operating loans in the past may need them this year, due to current market conditions and expectations for 2017,” said Gary Coleman, Regional Vice President for Farm Credit Mid-America. “Like all financial decisions, there are many factors you should consider with your loan officer before deciding if you need an operating loan.”Farmers should avoid using short-term operating loan cash to make large capital purchases if at all possible. If something happens and a farmer can’t pay the operating loan off in a year, they could get hit with a big interest bill and penalties.“This could also hurt your ability to get an operating loan in the future” Coleman said. “If you need to make a large capital purchase, work with your loan officer to find a loan that will allow you to spread the payments over several years.”Farmers should work with their loan officer to determine true input costs per acre, and determine the size of their loan from that point.“This will help you avoid higher interest payments and a larger debt-to-asset ratio,” Coleman said. “Accurately determining input costs will not only help you find the right size loan, but can also help you discover where you’re getting overcharged on inputs.”AUDIO: The Ohio Ag Net’s Ty Higgins visits with Farm Credit Mid-America’s Gary Coleman about figuring out the proper size of an operating loan.FCMA Financially Speaking Gary Colman 03.13.17For more financial tips, insights and perspectives from Farm Credit Mid-America visit e-farmcredit.com/insightslast_img read more

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ODA announces winner of the Bonnie Plants Cabbage Program

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest During an assembly for Streetsboro Elementary School students, Ohio Department of Agriculture Deputy Director Janelle Mead announced Riley Suchy as the 2016 winner of the Bonnie Plants Cabbage Program. Suchy received a $1,000 scholarship for growing a 39.8 pound cabbage as part of the company’s annual nationwide contest.“I am happy to honor Riley Suchy of Streetsboro Elementary School for growing an impressive cabbage and being named as Ohio’s 2016 winner,” said Deputy Director Mead. “The Bonnie Plants Cabbage Program is a great way to introduce younger generations to the importance of growing food, and it’s our hope programs like this one encourage students to consider a food or agriculture related career in their future.”Riley Suchy receives a $1,000 check as the Ohio winner of the Bonnie Plants 3rd Grade Cabbage Program. Pictured left to right: Bonnie Plants Representatives, Riley Suchy and ODA Deputy Director Janelle Mead.In 2002, Bonnie Plants started the 3rd Grade Cabbage Program to encourage young people to learn gardening and how to grow vegetables. Each year Bonnie Plants distributes more than 1 million free cabbage plants to students and classrooms all across the nation. Bonnie Plants awards a $1,000 scholarship to one student in each state. Each participating teacher in the state submits a class winner, with the final winner being randomly drawn by each state’s director of agriculture. For more information on the Bonnie Plants program, visit: http://bonniecabbageprogram.com/.last_img read more

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Catch a cacher by the toe. – “EANEY-MEANY-MINEY-MOE” (GC3Q51P) – Geocache of the Week

first_imgPhotos: Difficulty/Terrain Rating:2.5/1.5Why this is the Geocache of the Week:Some geocaches make you work for the find by being in a difficult-to-reach location, others make you solve a difficult puzzle before you can figure out the final coordinates. In the case of this geocache, the hard work comes once you get to the geocache’s location. Known as a field-puzzle (a puzzle solved—guess where—in the field), these geocaches require a certain level of patience, skill and maybe even a few TOTTs (tools of the trade). Geocachers at this puzzle have to use sticks to move a container to the top of the tube, but only one tube has the actual container. The best way to choose your tube? Eaney, meany, miney, moe. What the Geocache owner, mitrustme, has to say:“You have to work a matchstick container to the top of the pipe that has holes drilled into it with two nails and hope it has the log to sign and it not you have to start on the next pipe and so on till you get the right one.We had a cacher friend give us a single pipe and decided to make it a little harder, so we put four pipes on a pole and named it EANEY-MEANY-MENEY-MOE and put it in our front yard so we could watch everyone find it and bring them water on hot days and cocoa on cold days. We were very pleased everyone likes it and have made a lot of new friends.I just wanted to let everyone know this was my husband Ricky and my idea, he did the labor and put it up.  My husband was diagnosed with leukemia in Sept. 2011 and after 4 months of treatment he was in remission for nine months.  And I would like to thank all of our caching friends for make those nine months great.  He enjoyed all the caching trips we all went on and the events everyone put on.  Ricky passed on Nov. 17, 2012, 10 days after we found out his leukemia was back and I would like to thank all of our friends for their support.  Ricky loved caching!” This geocache requires hard work and a lot of patience.Two geocachers working to figure this one out.Which one will you pick?What has been the trickiest field puzzle geocache you’ve ever found? Tell us and post photos in the comments.Continue to explore some of the most engaging geocaches around the globe. Check out all the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, just fill out this form. Thanks!Share with your Friends:More A close up view of this tricky geocache.Geocache Name:“EANEY-MEANY-MINEY-MOE” (GC3Q51P) What geocachers are saying:“This is BY FAR, my favorite cache EVER!!!! Super fun, and quite inventive. Thx so very much for the cache, and the good time solving it!” – Caching Bayou Self“Super Cool Cache!!! One of the best I’ve seen anywhere! I really wish there were more like this!! T4TC. Thanks so much for the Goodies as well.” – ISPI“Awesome! Awesome! Awesome! Awesome! Truly a test of the fine motor skills and eye-hand coordination if ever there was one.” – Ian’s Dad SharePrint RelatedAuburn Sea (GC3QGYZ) — Geocache of the WeekSeptember 3, 2015In “Geocache of the Week”Do you think this is a game? — Flappy Cache (GC507NW) — Geocache of the WeekMarch 24, 2014In “Community”Maybe it’s over there? — To Too Two Easy (GC1XA6W) — Geocache of the WeekNovember 13, 2014In “Geocache of the Week”last_img read more

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Video Tutorial: 3D Folder in After Effects

first_img6Add a new point light to add shadows. 8Turn on cast shadows to the front layer. 10Precompose the front and back layers. Turn on the 3Dd button and the collapse transformations button. Have any tips for making 3D folders in After Effects?Share in the comments below. 3Pre-compose duplicated solid and name it “Front”. 14Create some text and stylize however you want in the pre-comp. 15Precompose the text and move the anchor point to the bottom of the text. Keyframe the position of the text to come out when the folder opens and go back in when before the folder closes. Rotate the paper forward and set motion blur on. In this Premiumbeat exclusive tutorial we show you how to create a 3D folder in Adobe After Effects.A 3D file folder could make a fitting addition to your next corporate video or presentation. In the following video tutorial we’ll show you how to create such a folder in After Effects. Tweak the settings and customize to give it your own look.The After Effects video tutorial covers:Using 3D layersUsing lights and shadowsLayer stylesPrecomposing 1Create a new composition and new brown solid. 7Rotate the back layer across the x axis just a few degrees.center_img Pay close attention to the way lights work with 3D objects. If you can’t see any shadows make sure your 3D layer has ‘accept shadows’ selected in the drop-down menu.Don’t want to watch the video? Follow along with the step-by-step tutorial below. Click any image for larger view.  12Keyframe a 5 frame rotation transitions. Have the folder rotate for 3 seconds and rotate back for 5 frames. 11Duplicate the light and parent one light to the front of the folder. Rotate 180 degrees and parent the other light to the folder. 9Make a new solid for the background. 5Add a white sticker label using a shaper layer, then add a hand written font on the tab. 4Mask out a folder tab using the pen tool. 13Go into the pre comp and set the x rotation of the front to 3 degrees, move forward 5 frames and set the rotation to 45 degrees. Set keyframes to simulate a “bounce”. 2Place the anchor point on the bottom of the solid and name it back. Duplicate.last_img read more

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National Heritage Month

first_img Related Items:national heritage month, rufus ewing NEW CHAIRMAN, PNP keeps Ewing Coming budget proposes police recruitment and aerial surveillance, says Premier Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Recommended for you PNP Convention Feb 19 Weekend; South Caicos woman announces at large interest Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 02 Oct 2014 – It is National Heritage month in the Turks and Caicos… the culture minister, Premier Rufus Ewing is asking the nation to use the time to reflect on traditions and the good old days of the TCI.last_img read more

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City of Chula Vista holds grand reopening for Len Moore Skate Park

first_img Elizabeth Alvarez, Posted: May 5, 2018 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings Updated: 1:45 PM City of Chula Vista holds grand re-opening for Len Moore Skate Park May 5, 2018 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) — The city of Chula Vista celebrated the reopening of Len Moore Skate Park Saturday with professional skate demonstrations, free raffles and local vendor giveways as well as live music.The Chula Vista Boys & Girls Club originally opened the park in 2003, but was forced to close operations in August due to costly maintenance and repair issues.Park ownership was transferred to the city, which cleaned up vandalism and graffiti then reopened the facility in late February after holding a series of community meetings to gauge stakeholder priorities.“Kids in the community really wanted a place to skate,” said Shaun Ellis, city principal recreation manager. “So rather than them breaking in, we want it to be more of a positive thing — a place where adults can skate or where parents can go with their kids.”The park now offers free admission for skateboarding, BMX biking and roller-skating from 8 a.m. to dusk. City officials also expect to hold skate classes, day camps and birthday party rentals at the facility. Elizabeth Alvarez Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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