Pence: “Very Close” to Renegotiated NAFTA

first_img Vice President Mike Pence said over the weekend he is “very hopeful” the U.S. is close to a renegotiated North American Free Trade Agreement. Talks to reach an agreement continue this week in Washington, D.C., as all sides are eyeing an early May finish line. Pence spoke at the Summit of the Americas in Peru over the weekend. He told reporters there is a “real possibility” an agreement could be reached in the next several weeks, according to Politico.Pence and an official from the U.S. Trade Representative’s office took part in bilateral meetings during the event with Canada and Mexico. The comments from Pence echo those from a Mexican trade official last week, who speculated that an agreement could be reached by early May. The timeline would allow the U.S. enough time to present the agreement to lawmakers following the November midterm election. Previous articleRyan Martin’s Indiana Ag Forecast for April 17, 2018Next articleIndiana Crop Weather April 16, 2018 Hoosier Ag Today Facebook Twitter SHARE Facebook Twitter Home News Feed Pence: “Very Close” to Renegotiated NAFTA By Hoosier Ag Today – Apr 16, 2018 Pence: “Very Close” to Renegotiated NAFTA SHARElast_img read more

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New scholarship at Champlain College celebrates 200 years of teaching by Accounting faculty

first_imgOn the evening of Tuesday, May 8, Champlain College announced the launch of an Accounting Excellence Scholarship Fund. The new endowment fund celebrates decades of teaching excellence by Champlains distinguished Accounting faculty.The fund will annually support two Accounting students who demonstrate both academic merit and financial need. Alumni and community members have rallied in support of the fund, placing it well on its way to raising an initial goal of $100,000 for the permanent endowment.Nearly 2,000 of Champlain’s Accounting graduates have benefited from the experience and mentoring of the Colleges seven current Accounting faculty who have recently surpassed a combined total of 200 years of service: Walt Luchini (39 years), Champ Soncrant (36 years), Eadie Templin (31 years), Thane Butt (26 years), Mitch Thibault (26 years), Nancy Wells (24 years) and David Mona (22 years). Their impact is noticeable when you walk into Vermont accounting firms, captive insurance firms and a variety of business organizations and take note of the saturation of Champlain Accounting graduates.”This scholarship extends the legacy of these Accounting faculty members in perpetuity,” said Champlain College President David F. Finney. “These individuals help define the caliber of the education for which Champlain is renowned: a student-centered experience made relevant by the real-world lessons of their professors.”At the event, President Finney announced that former Champlain Trustee Larry Walsh and his spouse Connie Walsh–both 1966 graduates of the College–have made a challenge gift for the scholarship fund. They will match up to $10,000 for gifts received in May. Larry Walsh has known Accounting professors Walt Luchini and Mitch Thibault since their grade school days in Burlington.Molly Lambert, president of the Vermont Captive Insurance Association, spoke at the Accounting Excellence event, as did Dr. Wayne Cunningham, the dean of Champlains Division of Business.Accounting is a rapidly growing field in today’s economy, and each year Champlain’s Accounting students are wooed by the regions businesses and firms. Students typically land a job by December of their senior year–some deciding between two and three offers.The College keeps its Accounting curriculum up to date by modifying and adding courses most relevant to the times. For example, a popular new course has been Forensic Accounting, where students learn fraud examination techniques, interview techniques, rules of evidence relating to internal control methodology, asset misappropriation and financial statement misrepresentation. Students explore rules of evidence as they relate to several different fraudulent activities including money laundering, cash skimming and embezzlement.Visit www.champlain.edu/portals/alumni/(link is external) for more information on the faculty members and the Accounting Excellence Scholarship Fund.last_img read more

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Hoops Tournament to Support Red Bank Youth in Honor of Martin

first_imgRUMSON – The 11th annual Hoops for Horizons 3-on-3 basketball tournament will be held at Rumson Country Day School on March 8-9 to benefit the Horizons Student Enrichment Program.Albert Martin Jr., the Red Bank Regional High School senior who died suddenly in December, will be honored during the Hoops for Horizon basketball tournament. Above, he sits on the sidelines for a moment while participating in last year’s tournament.This year the annual charity event has been named in honor of Albert E. Martin, Jr., the beloved Red Bank Regional High School Senior who died suddenly in December. A Hori­zons graduate, Albert returned each year to play in the hoops tournament working the court with his sure-handed basketball skills and easy smile.Albert spent three summers from grades 6-8 in the Horizons program. His mother, Traci Dixon, said, “Albert loved Hoops, loved Horizons and loved life.”Lore MacDonald, Horizons Rumson founder and past board president, recalled, “Albert was the kind of child every school would want in their community. He was affable and always smiling. He appealed to every person from every walk of life – just an amazing kid.”All boys and girls, grade 5 and up, are welcome to participate in the Albert E. Martin, Jr. Memorial Hoops for Horizons tournament. The competition begins at 3:30 p.m. March 8 with the fifth-grade division, followed by the high school/ adults under-29 bracket in the early evening. The event will conclude the next day with the middle school and adults 30-plus divisions. There will be prizes for winning teams, chance auctions, a bake sale and snacks for purchase with all money raised to benefit Hori­zons’ 2013 summer program and the 100-plus local students who attend.Horizons is an award-winning academic and recreational summer enrichment program whose mission is to promote the potential of children primarily from Red Bank in K-8th grade, who are living in low income circumstances. The Horizons program emphasizes math, reading, science, the arts, intramural sports and swimming, nutritious meals, as well as social growth. Horizons is committed to the development of the whole child through experiences that enhance self-esteem, foster awareness of community responsibility, build problem-solving skills and encourage a lifelong interest in learning.Paul Campanella, Rumson Country Day School athletics director and Albert E. Martin, Jr. Hoops for Horizons Tourna­ment coordinator, said, “We’re inviting everyone in the community to come out and play in Albert’s memory. He joined us every March for the past five years because Horizons was a program that made a difference in his life. He wanted to share that experience with other kids.”Horizons welcomes all friends and supporters to this fun-filled event. Additional information is available by contacting Horizons Executive Director Lori Hohenleitner at [email protected] Registration and donation information also can be found at www.rcds.org/horizons.last_img read more

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Hard work required for goal of old growth forests in Central Ohio

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest It has been said many times that prior to European settlement the trees were so thick and plentiful in the dense forests that a squirrel could cross what would become the State of Ohio without ever touching the ground. Anyone who has spent time in the woods can only dream of such a forest today with massive trees, plentiful wetlands and a vast array of flora and fauna.David Hague, with a childhood spent travelling some of the nation’s beautiful national parks, dreamed of what it would be like to stand amid that endless forest. His dreams of days spent among trees, however, were put on hold for many years as he thrived as a businessman in the water softener business in central Ohio where he enjoyed a successful career. Though his busy years of his career mostly kept him away from the natural Ohio he dreamed of, his success put him in a financial position to fulfill his unique vision: at least 500 years of old growth virgin forest in central Ohio.“We have decided to take marginal agricultural land and return it to as much of a pre-European state as we can. There are lots of bad invasive plants out there for us to kill but there are lots of interesting things to discover too. That’s what we are doing,” Hague said. “There are over 44,000 square miles in Ohio and 42,000 of that was virgin forest. Now there are just a few square miles of old growth forest left in the state. This land has been so abused and I want to return at least a small portion of it it to its native state. Every farm has areas that do not produce well or are too expensive to cultivate and these are the areas that we focus on.”In this effort, Hague has purchased about 850 acres of woodlots and farmland on the south side of rapidly sprawling Pickerington in Fairfield County. Of that, he plans to have 300 acres in a perpetual forest plan and leave the rest in farmland. The plan is to plant a total of 4,000 native tree species (heavy on oaks, maples, sycamore, and hackberry) that are four to six feet tall, an effort that is about half done. He has also moved roughly 5,000 cubic yards of soil to create around 20 wetlands and vernal pools on the property. He has done numerous prairie plantings and extensive removal of invasive species as well, all according to what the land was in its pre-settlement state.“I’ve got the land intact now to make it look and feel like it did 250 years ago — to get it back to what we lost,” Hague said. “I bought the land and it is here and that allows other people to contribute to this effort too. I could sell this and develop it and move to Wyoming, but there is too much work to do here. Ohio is so rich in diversity.”Hague has invested a large amount of his own money but also worked with the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Ohio River Basin Water Quality Trading Project. EPRI conducts research and development relating to the generation, delivery and use of electricity for the benefit of the public. The project in the Ohio River Basin got its start after EPRI began investigating the potential of water quality trading as an alternate means for power facilities to meet compliance goals with nutrient discharge limits, particularly for nitrogen. Today the program combines public and private funding sources to help implement various conservation practices in the Ohio River Basin, including the use of cover crops, nutrient management techniques and, in the case of Hague’s efforts, reforestation.As the trees grow and the wetlands fill up with water, Hague is already noticing changes in the environment. “The sounds are different now. You hear more variety. Even if you don’t know what that bird is or that insect is, you just notice a change in the sound. And once you hear and see some results and the changes of things around you, it all becomes worth it,” he said. “It makes me concerned about every bit of life out here. There is life everywhere that we just don’t know about. There are things out here I don’t know about and I just need to stop and listen and look.”While Hague has noticed the changes in the fields and forests, when that much land changes ownership, the local human population takes notice as well.“The farming community, since we are targeting the areas that aren’t particularly productive, they have been supportive and have been happy to assist. Politically, the mayor and trustees from Pickerington favor having open green space,” Hague said. The farmers who were farming the ground continue to rent the land from Hague and longtime hunters continue to hunt on the property because of the significant damage the high deer population can do to the tree plantings and native plant species.“When I bought the property there were hunters paying to hunt here. The first thing I did was to ask them here and tell that that they did not have to pay to hunt here any more but that I did want their help watching the property and removing invasive species. I insist on no shooting of does that have fawns,” Hague said. “I was prejudiced about hunters at first but every one I’ve worked with has been reliable and helpful. It has been a great relationship. They help remove invasive species and the hunters wereSpotted salamanders fill up the top container and the Jefferson and Small-mouth salamanders are on the bottom at Hague’s farm.even the first ones to find hard-to-find tiger salamanders on the property.”While the work on the land is endless, keeping the forestland protected for 500 years may prove even more daunting. Hague has worked closely with local government officials, Fairfield Soil and Water Conservation District and the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, among others to lay the groundwork for the plan. Tax wise, preservation of the productive farm ground is an essential component.“The goal is that 500 years from now this is all intact, but it has required a great deal of legal work because it is not a terribly common event for someone to plan out for that long,” Hague said. “What will the political entities be? What will the country, or countries, be in 500 years? We’ve had to think about all of those kinds of things to come up with a legal structure for this to continue on.”In the meantime, Hague is truly enjoying the process of reverting the land back to its native state and the results, as they appear.“Just to see a critter out doing its natural thing unobstructed and in its natural environment is very fulfilling. I think now that we have this property, we might as well make the effort to restore what we can,” Hague said. “We may be the top species but that doesn’t give us license to take away others’ existence. Ohio is a great place to live for people but it is also a great place to live for critters too, and many of these need old growth forest to survive so we thought maybe we could do something to help make that happen.”last_img read more

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Weekly Case Study: A Heritage City Turns To Virtualization

first_imgConcello de Santiago in northwest Spain is the government body for the city of Santiago de Compostela. The city is renowned for its medieval architecture. It’s a world heritage city.But the city had a problem. Its servers were showing the signs of old age. It was time to turn to virtualization and new hardware to modernize a technology infrastructure that at times did not work at all.The results: better uptime, less maintenance and consolidation of its servers. Download White Paper PDFA Medieval City Turns to Virtualization Related Posts Tags:#cloud#RWCloudSponsored Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market alex williamslast_img read more

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All About Wood Stoves

first_img Start Free Trial Already a member? Log in This article is only available to GBA Prime Members If you’ve been heating your house with wood for years, you probably don’t need to read this article. By now, you know all about the disadvantages and inconveniences that accompany wood heat, and yet you still heat with wood — either because you genuinely love wood heat, or because you love the low cost of the fuel. If you haven’t burned down your house by now, you may even have figured out how to install and operate your stove safely.This article is addressed to a different audience: those who are thinking about buying their first wood stove.For some homeowners, especially those who haven’t lived with a wood stove, wood heat has romantic associations. Veteran wood burners know better, however. As a document from the Cornell University Cooperative Extension points out, firewood “is one of the least convenient sources of heat, … requiring time and considerable effort to fell and split trees, move wood into dry outdoor storage for at least a year, transport wood indoors, maintain an effective woodstove fire, and keep the system cleaned for safety and efficiency.” I’ll add another disadvantage: if you heat with wood, you’ll be tethered to your house all winter. You won’t be able to go away for the weekend unless your house has a backup heating system to keep your plumbing pipes from freezing.Wood heat makes the most sense for:Don’t install an outdoor wood-fired boiler (sometimes mistakenly referred to as an “outdoor furnace”). These devices are notoriously polluting and inefficient. They require lots of electricity to run and they waste much of the energy value of the firewood they burn. Moreover, they are so smoky that they will drive your neighbors crazy. In many areas of the country, irate neighbors have sued owners of… center_img Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details.last_img read more

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How To Thrive In The Tech Industry For Decades

first_imgHow to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? brian s hall Worried about your longevity as a worker in the fast-moving tech industry? What you need is some inspiration from John Sloan.Who’s John Sloan? He’s the man pictured in a photo I used in a recent post on 10 Technology Skills That Will No Longer Help You Get A Job. (See that photo below – or on the iPad in the photo above.) While Sloan may look like a symbol of outdated technology in the older photo, he’s actually the polar opposite. As, in fact, the newer photo of him above should lead you to believe.Sloan, aka Chip Overclock, has not only participated in the many amazing, globe-spanning, nano-shrinking changes in computer tech over the past four decades, he has stayed current with the changes – and kept himself gainfully employed – by taking full responsibility for his own career and professional development.Pictures Tell The StoryThe picture below shows Sloan at Wright State University, Ohio, circa 1976. He would soon go on to earn his B.S. in computer science, and later his master’s degree. He’s seated next to an IBM System/360 Model 65. Why You Love Online Quizzes Related Posts 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… Sloan, now 56, lives in Denver. Several of his friends saw my story and noticed the photo, and forwarded it to him, which prompted him to contact me. Sloan describes his current career as a “freelance product developer specializing in real-time and highly concurrent systems.” The photo at the top of this post shows Sloan next to his Mac Mini with Cinema Display. That’s a first-generation iPad he’s holding – displaying the original picture, no less.Why John Sloan’s Story MattersTalking to John Sloan made it clear that long-term survival in the tech industry was about much more than just mastering a specific set of skills. Instead, it’s all about taking personal responsibility for learning and adapting over the years and decades:ReadWrite: Getting a computer science degree in 1976 was an awfully forward-thinking move.John Sloan: It was the closest I could get to living in the kind of science fictional universe that I was reading about and watching on television. I still remember today watching the very first episode of the original Star Trek.ReadWrite: Are you currently employed?  John Sloan: I’m a self-employed, offering consulting and contracting through my one-man company, Digital Aggregates, and have been since 2006.ReadWrite: How do you stay connected to all the changes in the computer industry?John Sloan: I spend almost all my time (when not working with clients) on professional development. I read, I attend conferences, I learn new skills. This is the kind of professional development that companies simply no longer offer anymore to their regular employees. My company exists not just to service my clients, but to keep me current and employable.Favorite Tech And ToolsReadWrite: What technologies have you worked on over the years?John Sloan: I’ve had a lot of career success, almost all in the systems area, much of it working low in the software stack, close to bare metal. I’ve worked on IBM mainframes, PDP-11 minicomputers. Cray supercomputers [all the way] to huge distributed Linux systems. My current gig is developing a tiny PBX with Iridium transceivers that will allow flyers in business jets to make phone calls from anywhere in the world.ReadWrite: What are your favorite tech tools now? John Sloan: My iPhone 5. I have no idea how I’d live without it.ReadWrite: One of the big tech shifts has been the move to open source. How have you tackled this change?John Sloan: Open source has been very good to me. For several years now a lot of my income has come from hacking open source software ranging from various portions of the Apache software stack written in Java to the Linux kernel and various portions of the GNU software stack in C.The economics of open source is the most interesting part about it. Back in the mainframe days, you bought the hardware, and got the software and support for free. Now the hardware is almost free, the software is mostly free, and the support is how a lot of companies book revenue.  ReadWrite: What about the shift from desktop to mobile?John Sloan: Every time I pick up my iPhone 5 or my iPad, I feel like I’m in a science fiction movie. Same goes for the Android mobiles. I also have a Samsung Galaxy tablet. It’s astounding.Tech Advice For Young And OldReadWrite: Do you have any advice for workers who have been in the industry a long time?John Sloan: Do not trust your career and professional development to your employer. You absolutely must take charge of this yourself.ReadWrite: What about advice for those just starting out?John Sloan: No matter what technologies is being taught when a freshman enters university, they will almost certainly not be the ones being taught when that senior graduates. And whatever technologies that student learns will not be what he ends up needing expertise in when he enters the workforce. Continuous, life-long learning isn’t a buzzword, it’s a requirement.People who grasp specific technologies but can’t quickly learn new ones on their own are the ones who are going to be laid off or whose jobs are going to be outsourced.ReadWrite: Anything else you want to add?John Sloan: Hardly a day goes by in which my wife of nearly 30 years and I don’t remark on how lucky we’ve been. Just the other day one of my friends and former Bell Labs colleagues remarked that she was surprised that she still got paid good money to do what she loves to do. I feel the same way.Lead image courtesy of Flickr. Tags:#education#employment#Open Source#programming Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoidlast_img read more

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Star fends off NLEX late, stays in top four hunt

first_imgE.T. returns to earth, reunites with grown-up Elliott in new ad  BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary The scores:STAR 101 – Simon 16, Lee 15, Acox 14, Ramos 14, Barroca 13, Dela Rosa 8, Melton 6, Pingris 6, Sangalang 4, Jalalon 3, Brondial 2, Reavis 0.MERALCO 93 – Fuller 16, Mallari 13, Fonacier 12, Alas 9, Al-Hussaini 9, Quinahan 9, Lastimosa 8, Taulava 5, Tiongson 5, J. Villanueva 3, Soyud 3, Baguio 1, Rios 0.Quarters: 17-25, 36-44, 72-69, 101-93. Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa PBA IMAGESStar turned back NLEX, 101-93, Sunday in the 2017 PBA Governors’ Cup at Smart Araneta Coliseum.The Hotshots leaned on the trio of Paul Lee, Kristofer Acox and Mark Barroca to keep themselves in the hunt for a top four seat.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:58Trump blames media, Democrats for impeachment during Kentucky rally01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  View comments Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Falcons edge Bulldogs for 2-2 record Lee poured in seven of his 15 points in the payoff period, Acox tallied a double-double with 14 markers and 10 rebounds, while Barroca had 13 points and four rebounds.“We had the proper mindset and it was to win. The only thing we had control of is our game and I’m proud of my players, especially in the second half,” said Star head coach Chito Victolero.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“They stepped up on defense plus we had a better ball movement on offense after that forgettable first half.”The victory improved the Hotshots’ slate to 7-4, to have a shot at a twice-to-beat. Their fate, however, will depend on the result of the Meralco-San Miguel game which is still being played as of posting. Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Read Next Lee and Barroca found their groove midway in the fourth quarter to trigger Star’s breakaway, 95-83, with 3:20 left.PJ Simon topscored for Star with 16 markers, while Aldrech Ramos got 14 points and four boards.Aaron Fuller led the Road Warriors with 16 points and 17 rebounds, while Alex Mallari got 13 markers, six boards, and four dimes in the loss.The Road Warriors are also in a wait-and-see approach as to what seed they will end up with.Meralco’s win would put NLEX at fifth place, while a San Miguel victory puts them in sixth.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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San Beda racks up 14th straight win, eliminates EAC

first_imgFire hits houses in Mandaluyong City MOST READ BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Kobe Bryant says he’d kneel for anthem Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. LATEST STORIES San Beda, Lyceum early favorites ahead of NCAA Season 93 PLAY LIST 02:12San Beda, Lyceum early favorites ahead of NCAA Season 9300:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Read Nextcenter_img Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary The Scores:SAN BEDA 88 – Soberano 17, Mocon 15, Tankoua 12, Abuda 10, Carino 8, Bolick 6, Tongco 6, Bahio 4, Noah 4, Presbitero 2, Adamos 2, Cabanag 2, Doliguez 0, Oftana 0.EAC 51 – Onwubere 22, Tampoc 8, Garcia 6, Pascua 5, Bugarin 5, Bautista 3, I. Mendoza 2, Munsayac 0, Corilla 0, J. Mendoza 0, Neri 0, Diego 0.Quarters: 26-11, 40-28, 60-34, 88-51. View comments AC Soberano. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netDisplaying its playoff form, San Beda waylaid Emilio Aguinaldo College, 88-51, to notch its 14th straight win Friday in the NCAA Season 93 men’s basketball tournament at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan.“We’re happy we got this win and I hope  we’ll be this consistent consistent until the end of the playoffs,” said coach Boyet Fernandez, as the Red Lions moved up to 15-1.ADVERTISEMENT “Credit to the boys for getting this one against EAC and hopefully this prepares against Letran next Friday and Lyceum next next week.”AC Soberano waxed hot as he went 5-of-7 from downtown to nab 17 points, and three rebounds to lead San Beda.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutJavee Mocon added 15 markers, eight of which coming in the opening frame, to go with 12 boards and three assists, while Donald Tankoua also registered a double-double with 12 points and 10 rebounds.Franz Abuda had 10 markers, while Robert Bolick dished a team-best 12 assists on top of his six points and three boards. Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH After EAC started the game on a 5-0 start, San Beda answered back with a killer 26-6 blast behind Mocon, Tankoua, and Abuda to grab a 26-11 lead and blow the game wide open.Though elated with how San Beda played against the Generals, Fernandez continued to preach consistency as the Red Lions brace for the final two elimination games as well as the playoffs.“We’re hoping to be consistent. It’s the first time we led by 37 points at the end of the game. I hope this will be a good start for us,” he said. “But again, I will just preach consistency on our execution and defense. We cannot win against LPU if we won’t be consistent in our execution and our defense.”Sidney Onwubere paced EAC with 22 points, six rebounds, and two assists, but was the lone bright spot for the team in the ouster.The Generals are now out of the playoff race after falling to their fourth straight defeat to drop to 6-10.ADVERTISEMENT Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF presidentlast_img read more

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Goldman Sachs CEO Blankfein to retire by year end – report

first_imgNEW YORK, N.Y. – Goldman Sachs Chief Executive Officer Lloyd Blankfein has started plans to retire and could do so as soon as the end of this year, The Wall Street Journal reported Friday.However, Blankfein distanced himself from the Journal’s story, joking on Twitter, “I feel like Huck Finn listening to his own eulogy.”Blankfein, 63, has run Goldman since 2006, and ran the New York firm through the housing market bubble and subsequent financial crisis. The firm also became a target of intense populist anger during the Great Recession. It emerged from the crisis transformed, focusing less on risky trading and is now exploring new businesses like consumer loans.The two people considered as candidates to replace Blankfein are Harvey Schwartz and David Solomon, who share the position as chief operating officer, the Journal said, citing undisclosed sources. Both Schwartz and Solomon have been considered successors to Blankfein in the past in reports.Discussions on whether Blankfein would step down heated up a few years ago when he was diagnosed with lymphoma. He successfully underwent radiation and chemotherapy and has publicly said he considers himself cured.Gary Cohn, who previously was Goldman’s chief operating officer, left last year to become chief economic adviser to President Donald Trump. He was considered at the time as the most likely successor to Blankfein. However, the Journal reported that Goldman is not looking beyond Schwartz or Solomon.Cohn resigned his position at the White House earlier this week and is not expected to return to Goldman.Blankfein is one of only a couple big Wall Street CEOs who ran their firms before the financial crisis and still are at the helms today. Bank of America, Citigroup, Morgan Stanley and Wells Fargo have all replaced their CEOs over the years. All who remain are Blankfein and Jamie Dimon, CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co.Blankfein in his later years has become more outspoken about his views. He has been a vocal critic of the Trump administration on immigration and diversity issues and typically uses his own Twitter account to weigh in on public issues. Along with his Mark Twain reference, Blankfein said on Twitter about the reports, “It’s @WSJ’s announcement … not mine.”A Goldman Sachs Group Inc. spokesman declined to comment on the report.last_img read more

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