Utah Men’s Tennis Aces Pac-12 Academic Awards

first_imgMay 29, 2018 /Sports News – Local Utah Men’s Tennis Aces Pac-12 Academic Awards FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSALT LAKE CITY-Tuesday,  University of Utah men’s tennis capped off a successful on-court season by setting a new program record for academic achievement.The Utes placed seven student-athletes on the Pac-12 All-Academic squads, showing the Utes can both ace the textbooks as well as their competition.Senior Egbert Weverink of Amsterdam, The Netherlands became the second Ute in program history to earn 1st team Pac-12 all-academic honors in consecutive seasons.Furthermore, Slava Shainyan, a sophomore from Moscow, Russia was selected to the all-Pac-12 first team, his first honor as a Ute.Making the second team was senior Santiago Sierra of Mexico City, Mexico as he joined current Utes’ assistant Matt Cowley as the only Ute in program history to earn Pac-12 all-academic honors in three consecutive seasons. Joining Sierra on the second team were junior Dan Allen of London, England, junior Joe Woolley of Boston, England and junior David Micevski of Skopje, Macedonia.Earning honorable mention honors for the Utes was redshirt sophomore Azat Hankuliyev of Salt Lake City. This was his first postseason recognition from the Pac-12.Since joining the Pac-12 in 2012, Utah men’s tennis has had 17 student-athletes earn 31 Pac-12 all-academic honors.In order to eligible for selection to the Pac-12’s all-academic squad, a student-athlete must have a minimum 3.0 GPA and compete in at least 50 percent of his team’s matches in men’s tennis. Brad James Tags: All-Academic Squad/Azat Hankuliyev/Dan Allen/David Micevski/Egbert Weverink/Joe Woolley/Matt Cowley/Santiago Sierra/Slava Shainyan/Utah Men’s Tennis Written bylast_img read more

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Mourinho has made Hazard a scapegoat… Chelsea boss MUST back Belgian

first_imgJose Mourinho has been urged to put his trust in Eden Hazard in order to turn Chelsea’s fortunes around.Hazard, the reigning PFA Player of the Year, has endured a severe dip in form this season.He has scored just once in 11 games and was hauled off after an hour on Saturday against Liverpool as the Blues crashed to a sixth Premier League defeat.But Cascarino believes Mourinho should shoulder the blame for the Belgian’s recent struggles, and says the Chelsea boss must start showing faith in the playmaker.“Jose been critical of Hazard and has made him one of the scapegoats for what has happened,” the ex-Chelsea striker said, speaking on the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast.“Eden Hazard now is looking for the substitution. If he is doing things that are not quite right, a bad ball, he knows his number is coming up. He is looking at the sidelines.“Jose should be saying to him, ‘I’m not taking you off today, you are staying on for 90 minutes and I am going to let you do what I know you can do’.“Eden Hazard is the one of the biggest players for Chelsea who can change the outcome of a football match and now he is looking over at the sidelines wondering if he is going to be subbed.”Saturday’s loss to Liverpool intensified speculation over Mourinho’s future, with many newspaper reports suggesting he has two games to save his job.But Cascarino believes the Portuguese – the most successful manager in Chelsea’s history – can turn things around if given time.He continued: “It’s the biggest week of Jose’s career. The results this week will determine whether he will stay for a longer period. Can he do it? Of course he can.“He has been an incredible manager. No one doubts Jose – will all owe know that he is that good.”last_img read more

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Pictures of the boss not welcome at Montreal axethrowing facility

first_imgMONTREAL – Do not bring pictures of the boss.That’s what Anton Pushkar, the owner of an indoor Montreal axe-throwing facility, tells enthusiasts who may want a particular photo as their target.“We’ve had people saying: ‘Can I put a picture of somebody really special right on the bull’s eye?’” Pushkar said in a recent interview.“And we did have a couple of people coming in who were a little more serious about it. It’s not something we want to see, but they do ask.”The appropriately named Rage Academy has 11 “throwing lanes” that are separated by steel fences. Customers entering the centre are greeted by huge lettering on the wall that reads, “Control Your Rage.”It says on its website it can accommodate up to 60 people “for every possible action from bachelor to divorce celebration.”Pushkar, 27, said axe-throwing is still a relatively new form of mass entertainment.Young professionals and students between the ages of 25 and 35 now make up about 35 per cent of his clientele.The Siberian-born Pushkar said a lot of singles come in to try their hand.“You would be surprised, but often the girls get the hang of it much quicker than the guys,” he added.Three different sizes of the steel hatchets are available for players, including one for two-handed tossing.Kids are allowed to try the activity — if they are able to safely throw a specially made small axe.“We’ve had 10-year-olds who were throwing better than their adult parents,” said Pushkar, adding that even people in their 80s have come in for target practice.Roger Beaudoin, 96, who used to compete in lumberjack festivals, has also paid a visit.He took first place in several axe-throwing competitions around Quebec.But Beaudoin, who still tosses around an axe in his backyard in the village of Sainte-Emelie-de-l’Energie, says “all good things come to an end.”“I don’t have the capacity to be as accurate as I used to be, but I hit the target a few times,” he said in an interview with The Canadian Press.Pushkar, who came to Montreal from central Russia with his parents 14 years ago, said all activities at his venue are supervised by instructors who also provide training.He stressed that alcohol consumption is not allowed and that inebriated clients who come in are told to “get some fresh air and come back later.”“So far, here at Rage we’ve had no accidents involving axes,” Pushkar said.But some people end up cutting their fingers when they try to see how sharp the axe is.“Band-Aids are our biggest expense in terms of safety,” Pushkar joked.It costs a total of $40 per target per hour for three people, Monday to Thursday, and $50 on weekends.There are also special group rates.For serious competitors, there’s the Toronto-based National Axe Throwing Federation, whose members are from Canada, the United States, Australia and Poland.The federation, which was established in 2016, represents the sport of axe-throwing on behalf of 17 member organizations with more than 3,000 members in 39 cities.Commissioner Matt Wilson says one major tournament is held every year in February in Toronto.“The first stage of the tournament happens across all organizations that are part of the NATF,” he said in an interview.“The top 128 people then make it to the final day of the Toronto tournament.”The federation’s specific mandate is to promote uniform rules of competition, security measures and similar training techniques.Wilson also owns “B.A.T.L – Backyard Axe Throwing League,” which has been around for 11 years.last_img read more

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People with disabilities lose hopes skills in psych hospital inquiry told

first_imgHALIFAX – Leaving people with intellectual disabilities in a Halifax psychiatric hospital has created “an unnatural setting” where skills and hopes fade away as years go by, a behavioural therapist told a human rights inquiry Thursday.Nicole Robinson, a behavioural therapist who works in an acute care unit of the Nova Scotia Hospital, testified that seven of nine patients she treats have been medically discharged but are in limbo because of the lack of supported housing in the community.She said one of the men has been on the ward for about four decades.The inquiry is examining a 2014 complaint by 46-year-old Beth MacLean and 45-year-old Joseph Delaney that the province has violated the Human Rights Act by failing to move them from a hospital-like setting into a community home.“People are faced with a roadblock to go on to the next step. They’re kind of held there,” Robinson told the inquiry.She then proceeded to give evidence that was a rare glimpse into a locked-door hospital setting that frustrates the efforts of highly trained staff.She explained that applied behavioural analysis is used to reinforce positive habits and patterns that range from table manners to simple tasks such as washing your own hair.However, Robinson said to make the skills stick, people with disabilities need to apply them in homes with roommates, a quiet atmosphere and trained staff they see regularly.If that doesn’t happen, the work by the therapists often falls apart as the skill the person has learned atrophies and the patient reverts to a life of reliance on institutional staff and routines.The constant refusals to provide a home also creates a depressing cycle for her clients, she said.She recalled meetings with Department of Community Services staff informing them the client was ready to leave and receive community-based care.However, she said she would encounter an ever-changing set of criteria from the department.“We continue to work on the goals they provide, we achieve them, they may come up with another set of goals, and then we continue this cycle,” she said.Robinson was hired to bring intensive behavioural therapy to the hospital and the outreach teams in 2015.Her position was among those recommended in a scathing 2006 independent report that warned a human rights case could unfold if ways weren’t found to house the medically discharged patients elsewhere.However, during her testimony, Robinson told the inquiry she’s found it challenging to make progress due to the shortage of small options homes.“I can’t adhere to what I’ve been trained to do, which is to teach a skill … (have the patient) learn it and generalize it to other settings. It’s not a healthy place to be,” she said.Part of the problem are inadequacies in the facility itself, which has one van available for outings and a gym that is often used by community groups.The patient’s motivation levels to learn and change behaviours frequently plunge in a hospital environment, where trips are cancelled and promises aren’t kept, said Robinson.She gave the example of one patient who has been told if she would “use … gentle hands,” rather than hitting, she could move to a group home.“But she’s been in the hospital five or six years. You can understand that if you’re being told you’re going to achieve this outcome and it doesn’t come, I feel like I’ve done her a disservice. She loses her motivation and we need to find new territory to motivate her,” she testified.She said she’d worked with both MacLean and Delaney, and helped prepare them to depart.After 15 years on waiting lists, MacLean was moved to a hospital-like setting at the Community Transition Program facility in Halifax in 2016, and briefly was able to live in a group home, but has since returned to the Community Transition Program.Robinson testified there’s little difference between the transition program and Emerald Hall, as they are institutional environments with staff working on shifts, scheduled activities and locked doors.“The main outcome of my work as a behaviour analyst is to teach someone to independently use their skills … in a natural environment,” she said.“The settings I’ve described … are the most unnatural settings.”The provincial government has said it is preparing more small options homes, but that it can’t place patients with more complex needs until homes with safe and appropriate levels of care are available.Follow (at)mtuttoncporg on Twitter.last_img read more

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City of Chula Vista holds grand reopening for Len Moore Skate Park

first_img Elizabeth Alvarez, Posted: May 5, 2018 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings Updated: 1:45 PM City of Chula Vista holds grand re-opening for Len Moore Skate Park May 5, 2018 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) — The city of Chula Vista celebrated the reopening of Len Moore Skate Park Saturday with professional skate demonstrations, free raffles and local vendor giveways as well as live music.The Chula Vista Boys & Girls Club originally opened the park in 2003, but was forced to close operations in August due to costly maintenance and repair issues.Park ownership was transferred to the city, which cleaned up vandalism and graffiti then reopened the facility in late February after holding a series of community meetings to gauge stakeholder priorities.“Kids in the community really wanted a place to skate,” said Shaun Ellis, city principal recreation manager. “So rather than them breaking in, we want it to be more of a positive thing — a place where adults can skate or where parents can go with their kids.”The park now offers free admission for skateboarding, BMX biking and roller-skating from 8 a.m. to dusk. City officials also expect to hold skate classes, day camps and birthday party rentals at the facility. Elizabeth Alvarez Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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