Could Alex Dunbar be back in Scotland’s blue sooner than we expect?

first_imgA revolutionary knee-surgery technique could have been be the answer to Alex Dunbar’s and Scotland’s problems, writes Richard Bath. When strong-running Scotland centre Alex Dunbar damaged his knee two days before the Calcutta Cup, it was a devastating blow for Scottish rugby. Not only did one of the standout backs of the championship miss the Twickenham game, but the diagnosis of a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament has put his participation in this autumn’s World Cup in grave doubt given that the injury requires surgery, and a six-to-nine-month recovery period. However, this needn’t have been the case.Dunbar underwent an ACL reconstruction this month, but he could have gone for a ground-breaking surgical technique pioneered by a former Scottish Rugby Union surgeon, Professor Gordon Mackay. The technique is changing the prognosis for injured rugby players such as Dunbar. The use of Mackay’s internal brace technology could accelerate a player like Dunbar’s recovery period to the point where they is back playing before the end of the season. As it stands, Dunbar will struggle to be anywhere near peak fitness by the time Scotland take on Japan at Kingsholm on 23 September.The technique involves inserting small biodegradeable screws into the bone either side of the affected joint, and connecting them with what is effectively a tiny bungee cord made of a super-strong polymer. The brace stabilises the joint and allows the patient to begin light exercise within a week, and because there’s no plaster cast and none of the usual loss of muscle condition, instead of taking 16-24 weeks to recover full function after a conventional ligament/tendon reconstruction, an internal brace will bring that time down to an average of 8-12 weeks. Not only that, but because of the lack of grafts, injured sportsmen who have undergone an operation using an internal brace will not experience the arthritis associated with traditional reconstructions, in later life.Although Mackay has found that the technique works on high impact sports such as judo, skiing and football, with clients fast-tracked back into action including skier Alain Baxter, footballer Craig Moore and Olympic judoka Gemma Gibbons, his first internal brace patient was a young Scottish rugby player, and the results in rugby have been consistently stunning. Take, for instance, young Hawick three-quarter Rory Hutton, who sustained grade three ligament damage to his ankle during a BT Premiership league match. After a prompt operation in which professor Mackay inserted an internal brace, Hutton was running three weeks later at 50% body weight on an anti-gravity treadmill, and played a league match for the Borders club eight weeks to the day after he was taken off on a stretcher.Wounded Warrior: Glasgow will miss Dunbar’s presence during the coming weeks. (Photo: Inpho)Perhaps even more remarkable is the case of another Scottish player, Nick Binning of Hillfoots, who suffered what would once have been a catastrophic, career-ending knee dislocation that was further complicated by severe internal damage to three ligaments plus a fractured bone. Instead of taking a year off – which is the minimum amount of time to recover from such an injury, if indeed the player ever recovered – Binning was back running after seven weeks, a remarkable testament to Mackay’s skills. Although Mackay operates across most sports – as well as the SRU, he has worked with Rangers and Celtic football clubs, Scotland’s Olympians via his tie-up with the Scottish Institute of Sport, and was on duty at both the Commonwealth Games and Ryder Cup – rugby remains uniquely placed to benefit from his new technique, as Dunbar may well find out in the coming weeks…For more information, and videos of reconstructions and rehab, see www.mackayclinic.co.ukcenter_img Alex the great: Dunbar had become a major force for Scotland before injury struck. (Photo: Action Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Cycle tracks viewed as better for safety, crime, and economy in Mexico

first_img Read Full Story Cycle tracks — physically separated bicycle-exclusive paths along roads — were associated with improved safety from crashes, lowered crime, and heightened economic development in research conducted in Mexico by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Mexican researchers. The research also revealed that the bike facility designs in a developing nation, such as Mexico, may have to be different from designs in a developed nation. The residents in the city of Morelia who ranked and commented on six different types of bicycle facilities suggested that cycle tracks had to have a high concrete island barrier because a driver could drive over a low barrier and park. The residents also suggested that a bus/bike lane would not be safe in Mexico because the bus drivers might be less watchful for bicyclists.The study was published online Dec. 22, 2017 in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.The idea for the study began when lead author Ines Alveano, then a Ph.D. student in Mexico, contacted Anne Lusk, research scientist in the Department of Nutrition. Alveano had been formulating research about bicycling in Morelia and happened to meet Luis Miranda-Moreno, a professor from McGill who had done research about biking with Lusk and suggested Alveano contact Lusk. Alveano and Lusk began working long-distance on the survey and data collection. Alveano was invited to the Department of Nutrition as a visiting student to analyze the data and prepare the manuscript with Lusk and Maryam Farvid, research scientist in the department.“Improving conditions for biking in developing countries is an important public health issue, and we were happy to have the opportunity to collaborate with Ines on this study in her home country,” said Lusk.Learn moreRead a September 2016 Fox News article: Bike lanes are a sound public health investmentBiking on cycle tracks safer than cycling in the road (Harvard Chan School news)How can we make biking safer and easier?  (Harvard Chan School’s This Week in Health podcast)last_img read more

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Munoz, Elliott land Longdale wins

first_imgAngel Munoz was the Saturday IMCA Sunoco Stock Car feature winner at Longdale Speedway. (Photo by Gary Pigg, IMAGEZx2)LONGDALE, Okla. (May 20) – Angel Munoz outlasted seventh-starting Jason Rogers to capture the IMCA Sunoco Stock Car main event Saturday at Longdale Speedway.Kyle Pfeifer placed third, Travis Baird fourth and Hesston Shaw fifth.Robert Elliott garnered the IMCA SportMod feature win while Joe Adams advanced from eighth starting to second.Mike Roach raced from ninth to third. Jeffrey Kaup scored a fourth-place finish and Kaleb Roach was fifth.Both IMCA features were 35-lappers.last_img read more

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Stony Brook seeks revenge on Hartford

first_imgFEARLESS FRESHMEN: Hartford’s Malik Ellison, Moses Flowers and Miroslav Stafl have combined to score 48 percent of the team’s points this season and have accounted for 52 percent of all Hawks scoring over the last five games.FACILITATING THE OFFENSE: Traci Carter has made or assisted on 48 percent of all Hartford field goals over the last five games. Carter has accounted for 26 field goals and 30 assists in those games.ASSIST-TO-FG RATIO: The Hawks have recently created buckets via assists more often than the Seawolves. Stony Brook has an assist on 27 of 60 field goals (45 percent) across its previous three outings while Hartford has assists on 37 of 72 field goals (51.4 percent) during its past three games.DID YOU KNOW: Stony Brook is ranked second among America East teams with an average of 70.6 points per game.___ Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditHartford (15-14, 8-6) vs. Stony Brook (18-10, 9-4)Island Federal Credit Union Arena, Stony Brook, New York; Wednesday, 7 p.m. ESTBOTTOM LINE: Hartford goes for the season sweep over Stony Brook after winning the previous matchup in West Hartford. The teams last played each other on Jan. 15, when the Hawks shot 40.4 percent from the field while limiting Stony Brook’s shooters to just 36.2 percent on the way to the 68-65 victory. For more AP college basketball coverage: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25___This was generated by Automated Insights, http://www.automatedinsights.com/ap, using data from STATS LLC, https://www.stats.com February 25, 2020center_img Stony Brook seeks revenge on Hartford Associated Press last_img read more

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Women’s hoops falls to UCSB by 11 points

first_imgHowever, the Trojans struggled to run offense and keep possession of the ball all night, finishing with 19 turnovers, one lower than their season high mark of 20, and 9 more than UCSB’s total.  Trakh commended his team for its continuous effort despite being so shorthanded. Freshman guard Endyia Rogers posted 10 points and six rebounds with just one turnover against UCSB. ( Yannick Peterhans | Daily Trojan) The shorthanded Trojans were undefeated before the road contest in Santa Barbara, posting a 3-0 mark following a trio of comfortable wins to open up the 2019-20 campaign.  The USC women’s basketball team suffered its first loss of the season Monday, falling to UC Santa Barbara 57-46.  Trakh also added that a recent slew of injuries have forced the young Trojans into a “baptism by fire,” as they’ve been forced to adjust to the speed and intensity of the collegiate game on the fly.  Trakh attributed USC’s free throw woes to inexperience.  The Gauchos made USC pay for its turnover woes, winning the points off turnover battle by a mark of 22-5, a gap of 17 points in a game that was decided by 11. “I don’t fault the young kids at all — there’s going to be a learning curve, and they’re a talented group that’s working hard,” Trakh said. “We’ve just got to keep moving in the right direction and being very patient with them.” Injuries and mistakes killed the Trojans, who were without standout graduate transfer guard Stephanie Watts and senior forward Kayla Overbeck due to injuries. They remain without freshman guard Madison Campbell and redshirt sophomore guard Shalexxus Aaron, who have yet to make an appearance this season due to their own respective ailments.  The Trojans’ late push fell short, however, as the Gauchos pulled away in the late stages to bring the lead to double digits. The Gauchos were 1-2 heading into the matchup, coming off a tight loss to San Jose State. A strong stretch from the Trojans gave them the lead following a 5-0 personal run from Rogers, but the Gauchos answered back with an 11-0 run to jump out to a lead they did not relinquish.  “I think how we bounce back and what kind of heart and desire we play with will give me a barometer on this team,” Trakh said. “The future is bright — we just have to be patient.”  “I think that’s youth and understanding; you’ve gotta be ready to play and understanding that teams are going to come after you,” Trakh said. “I think that’s a learning experience.” The previously mentioned comeback effort nearly came to fruition as freshman guard Alyson Miura sank a clutch 3-pointer to bring USC within 2 points with four and a half minutes to play.  USC women’s basketball is back in action against star junior guard Chennedy Carter and No. 6-ranked Texas A&M Saturday at Galen Center at 5:30 p.m. Santa Barbara was also led by junior point guard Danae Miller, who filled the stat sheet with six rebounds and four assists to go along with 12 points.  The offensive struggles would continue for the Trojans, as a dismal 20-point second half ensured UCSB never had to look back. The Gauchos won the game comfortably despite a late push from head coach Mark Trakh’s unit.  Stout defense from UCSB limited the Trojans to 3 points for the final five minutes of the first half, and the Gauchos carried a 34-26 advantage into halftime.  Saturday will certainly be an early test for Trakh’s young squad, and the Trojans will be eager to make a statement against a premier opponent following their first loss of the season. The Gauchos were also spurred by a dominant performance from freshman forward/center Ila Lane, who had a double-double with 21 points and 12 rebounds, including five offensive rebounds. The win moves UCSB to an overall mark of 2-2 on the year. As for his expectations for Saturday’s big matchup, Trakh said he’s looking forward to seeing how his team responds to the UCSB defeat and competes against some of the top talent in the country.  The freshman duo of forward Alissa Pili and guard Endyia Rogers shouldered the offensive load. The two built upon strong starts to their Trojan careers; each posted 10 points, and they combined for 11 rebounds.  The Trojans shot just 25% from the free throw line, on 2-of-8 shooting. In the Trojans’ first three games, which were all wins, they shot over 90% from the charity stripe in two games and 78% in the other. While not the only issue in USC’s first loss, this would be troubling for the Trojans should the trend continue. last_img read more

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Hoops Tournament to Support Red Bank Youth in Honor of Martin

first_imgRUMSON – The 11th annual Hoops for Horizons 3-on-3 basketball tournament will be held at Rumson Country Day School on March 8-9 to benefit the Horizons Student Enrichment Program.Albert Martin Jr., the Red Bank Regional High School senior who died suddenly in December, will be honored during the Hoops for Horizon basketball tournament. Above, he sits on the sidelines for a moment while participating in last year’s tournament.This year the annual charity event has been named in honor of Albert E. Martin, Jr., the beloved Red Bank Regional High School Senior who died suddenly in December. A Hori­zons graduate, Albert returned each year to play in the hoops tournament working the court with his sure-handed basketball skills and easy smile.Albert spent three summers from grades 6-8 in the Horizons program. His mother, Traci Dixon, said, “Albert loved Hoops, loved Horizons and loved life.”Lore MacDonald, Horizons Rumson founder and past board president, recalled, “Albert was the kind of child every school would want in their community. He was affable and always smiling. He appealed to every person from every walk of life – just an amazing kid.”All boys and girls, grade 5 and up, are welcome to participate in the Albert E. Martin, Jr. Memorial Hoops for Horizons tournament. The competition begins at 3:30 p.m. March 8 with the fifth-grade division, followed by the high school/ adults under-29 bracket in the early evening. The event will conclude the next day with the middle school and adults 30-plus divisions. There will be prizes for winning teams, chance auctions, a bake sale and snacks for purchase with all money raised to benefit Hori­zons’ 2013 summer program and the 100-plus local students who attend.Horizons is an award-winning academic and recreational summer enrichment program whose mission is to promote the potential of children primarily from Red Bank in K-8th grade, who are living in low income circumstances. The Horizons program emphasizes math, reading, science, the arts, intramural sports and swimming, nutritious meals, as well as social growth. Horizons is committed to the development of the whole child through experiences that enhance self-esteem, foster awareness of community responsibility, build problem-solving skills and encourage a lifelong interest in learning.Paul Campanella, Rumson Country Day School athletics director and Albert E. Martin, Jr. Hoops for Horizons Tourna­ment coordinator, said, “We’re inviting everyone in the community to come out and play in Albert’s memory. He joined us every March for the past five years because Horizons was a program that made a difference in his life. He wanted to share that experience with other kids.”Horizons welcomes all friends and supporters to this fun-filled event. Additional information is available by contacting Horizons Executive Director Lori Hohenleitner at [email protected] Registration and donation information also can be found at www.rcds.org/horizons.last_img read more

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Group Forms To Protect The Navesink River

first_imgBy John BurtonFAIR HAVEN – Brian Rice wants to work on improving the Navesink River and has support from neighboring communities.Rice and other like-minded individuals have re-established the Navesink River Municipalities Committee, which intends on working on issues related to the river, especially the rising level of bacteria that has been revealed in recent studies.“I think it’s something that we can’t turn our backs on,” Rice said of the river’s current condition.The committee was active in the early 2000s, involving government representatives and citizens from the communities bordering on the river. But by about 2008, “things kind of fell apart at that time,” and the committee really ceased to continue, observed Zachary Lees, ocean and coastal policy attorney for the environmental group, Clean Ocean Action.“I just think it kind of ran out of steam,” as volunteer groups can on occasion, Rice said.Cindy Burnham, a Red Bank Borough Council member, who is one of Red Bank’s designated committee members, said the original committee had a couple of members die, which contributed to the loss of momentum. On top of that, Lees pointed out, 2008 was the release of the state Department of Environmental Protection’s pollution source-tracking study, which at that time indicated an overall improvement to the water’s condition.But since that time, there have been studies from county and state agencies, as required by the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA), that have shown an increase of bacteria in the river waters, including a rise in fecal contamination. That has caused the DEP to increasingly expand the area where recreational and commercial shelf fishing is prohibited.“There is a bacteria problem in the Navsink,” Lees said, resulting in “hundreds and hundreds of acres” closed to shellfish harvesting.Rice is a fourth generation Fair Haven family, with his parents still living in the family home on the river’s shore where Rice grew up. In addition to operating a financial services firm with his father, Rice is a licensed charter boat captain— “My fun job,” he acknowledged.“So, I have deep roots on the river,” he said, explaining in part his commitment to improve it.The Navesink River plays an important role for not only the area’s environmental health but its recreational and commercial viability. As such, Rice has adopted a motto, he shared: “Keep and maintain the river, leave it better than we found it for the next generation.”The newly-formed committee has had its first meeting, held last month at the Red Bank Municipal Complex, 90 Monmouth St., and will continue to meet the third Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m., with the meetings open to the public. At its first meeting in May, committee members selected Rice as its chair.The group has established its mission statement involving monitoring the river’s condition to positively impact its health and wellbeing, Rice explained.So far, Red Bank, Tinton Falls, Fair Haven and Rumson have appointed members and the committee is waiting for Middletown and Colts Neck to sign on, Rice said.Burnham said the committee in its earlier iteration was instrumental “in getting things done,” encouraging the river’s dredging to improve its health, among other steps. She hopes the work will aggressively look at the pollution and its source to correct it, Burnham added.“We’re really happy that they’re back,” Lees offered, believing it’s a good forum for environmental discussions and a means of communicating with local governing bodies. “We can get things done in a cooperative way,” working with the committee and local elected officials, Lees said.Rice said he’s committed to improving the water’s condition and the committee’s work. “I’m going to see it through,” he said.last_img read more

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Christmas Fort Hancock Style, Circa 1943

first_imgPeaceful moments between companions, small talk over grainy photos and kids spinning records in the living room were simple pleasures of the holiday season on Officer’s Row in 1943. Three-quarters of a century later, the experience was revived at the Sandy Hook site by the Army Ground Forces Association (AGFA). Welch’s wife Anne said Christmas decorations, vocal groups like the Swingtime Dolls and a visit from the big man himself, Santa Claus, were the historically accurate lures to get locals through the door and open their minds to what life on an isolated military base was like during the early 1940s. Inside the preserved residence – one of 18 historic officers homes constructed on site between 1898 and 1899 that make up Officer’s Row – the pocket doors were open to reveal family room settings alive with curious patrons flipping through albums of black-and-white photos. A younger group hovered near an illuminated Christmas tree trying to unravel the mystery of a desktop phonograph. “These interpretations of the past are meant to provoke thought and cause people to explore more on their own. We want to give people a taste of the story, which in turn causes them to go after more of it,” said Welch, a retired United States Army colonel with 30 years of military service. According to Welch, despite the holiday cheer, those stationed at Fort Hancock were still left with a sense of uncertainty about what the war would bring. After all, the garrison was a strategic stronghold used to guard New Jersey’s coastal waters from German U-boats and ensure safe passage of cargo in and out of the New York Harbor. “Warring soldiers coming together to celebrate life in a time of great darkness, that’s a miracle, and shows the power of Christmas. These types of stories resonate with people and their telling is all part of hosting events like these. It’s about bringing people together in a historical setting, piquing their interest with other historical discussions and inspiring them explore it deeper,” Uhler added.For more information about the History House at Fort Hancock visit sandyhookfoundation.com/history-house. Some of the troops simply arranged joint burials for fallen comrades or coordinated prisoner exchanges, but in other documented cases, soldiers exchanged food and souvenirs, played soccer games and even sang “Silent Night.” In a Dec. 15 interview with The Two River Times, AGFA Board of Directors member Shawn Welch said living history experiences are an effective way to bring local residents back in time. “People don’t realize how important that harbor was to World War II,” Welch said. “Sixty percent of everything we sent to Europe went through it. The Army’s job was to keep it open, and the Germans weren’t playing along. They sunk more than 5,100 of our ships in the Atlantic Ocean during the war. That’s one ship every eight hours.” In the foyer of the History House, Trinity Hall music director Andrew Bogdan said the event was a teachable moment for his students.  SANDY HOOK – A couple sat hand-in-hand on the garland-draped porch of the History House at Fort Hancock and looked out over five miles of Sandy Hook Bay separating the historic landing from the hustle and bustle of the mainland. “This is a very special time of year and you see how special it is through stories like that of the Christmas truce,” said Rev. John Uhler, an AGFA member.   “Some people are a little mixed on what military life is all about,” said Anne, who was dressed in an authentic military nurse’s uniform. “The socialization of the garrison and the acknowledgement of the holidays was a big part of it. There was a sense of family and community on the base and it’s something that needs to be recognized. It’s something we try to depict to people. Not every aspect of the military is militaristic.” During Saturday’s proceedings, Bogden sat behind an authentic World War II-era chaplain field organ, setting the stage for his choral group to perform a collection of Christmas classics, none more emotionally stirring for the vocalists than “Silent Night.” “Playing the song in this setting is very meaningful for all of us and a moment I know the girls are never going to forget,” said Bogden, who explained how in preparation for the performance he told his students the story of the Christmas truce of 1914, an unprecedented moment in the first World War when soldiers from opposing sides of the Western Front emerged from their fox holes and ventured into no man’s land on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day.last_img read more

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PAPACOOLPAPACOOL RALLIES TO WIN $75,000 PASADENA STAKES AT ONE MILE ON TURF; TRUJILLO, D’AMATO TEAM FOR 1 ½ LENGTH SCORE IN FIELD OF NINE SOPHOMORES

first_img–30– ARCADIA, Calif. (March 21, 2015)–Attentive to the pace under Elvis Trujillo, Papacoolpapacool saved ground at the rail to the quarter pole, swung three-wide turning for home and overhauled pacesetter Anytime Anyplace and Soul Driver for an impressive 1 ½ length win in Saturday’s $75,000 Pasadena Stakes at Santa Anita. With a field of nine 3-year-olds contesting one mile on turf, Papacoolpapacool, who is trained by Phil D’Amato, got the distance in 1:36.55.“Elvis had him a little further back last time out and he was able to make up the ground on the rail,” said D’Amato. “I kind of wanted him closer today so he could get a jump on the closer. Elvis had him right where I wanted him, saving ground and stalking. He angled him out and he came with a big run…He’s a turf horse for now. I’m just happy I have an improving horse.”Off at 5-1, Papacoolpapacool paid $12.40, $7.00 and $5.00.Owned by Cellist Racing Group, LLC and Ali Nilforushan, Papacoolpapacool, a Kentucky-bred colt by Temple City out of the Saint Ballado mare Sainttwok, notched his second consecutive win going a mile on turf at Santa Anita and improved his overall mark to 7-3-1-1. With the winner’s share of $47,700, he increased his earnings to $145,350.“It was a perfect trip,” said Trujillo. “At the three eighths pole, I saw that Soul Driver was moving too early so I waited a little bit. Once we moved out, my horse was gone.”Breaking from the far outside with Martin Pedroza up, Anytime Anyplace showed the way until tackled by Soul Driver approaching the quarter pole, repelled his challenge a sixteenth out, but couldn’t hold the winner off late. Off at 13-1 Anytime Anyplace paid $11.00 and $7.00.Ridden by Gary Stevens, Soul Driver was last after a half mile, made an eye catching move four-wide going to the three eighths pole but could not sustain his run through the drive. The second choice in the wagering at 3-1, he paid $3.40 to show.Fractions on the race were 23.58, 49.17, 1:13.35 and 1:24.83.last_img read more

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AVENGE GETS REVENGE IN ULTRAFLEET STAKES AT SANTA ANITA

first_imgARCADIA, CA, MAY 1, 2015 – Traffic trouble couldn’t stop Avenge Friday as the Richard Mandella trainee rolled late to register a head victory in the $78,550 Ultrafleet Stakes at Santa Anita under Flavien Prat.A 3-year-old filly by War Front, Avenge was on the rail throughout the 6 ½ furlong hillside turf race until she tried to find room to run entering the stretch but was blocked by a wall of horses. She broke from the No. 1 post position in a field of five 3-year-old fillies but found herself in some difficulty just before approaching the dirt portion of the course.“She was in trouble just before we hit the dirt but she was in the bridle early on,” said Prat. “I didn’t have anywhere I could go though, so it was tough. After I was in the clear I was OK. I waited to take the lead until the very last moment because I knew she would lug in a little.”With the victory, Avenge posted her third consecutive hillside win and her first added money victory.Avenge, owned by Ramona Bass, LLC, paid $5.20, $4.20, and $3 across the board and covered the distance on a firm track in 1:14.07 under 121 pounds. The fractions, set by longshot Ethan’s Baby and 4-5 favorite She’s a Big Winner, were 21.68, 43.79 and 1:07.75.She’s a Big Winner battled on the lead with Ethan’s Baby throughout but drifted in towards the rail mid-stretch, causing Ethan’s Baby to take up. She’s a Big Winner ended up fifth.Longshot Moons Over Me under Drayden Van Dyke sat out of it early, went wide going into the stretch and had the lead on the far outside but was caught late by Avenge in between horses. Moons Over Me paid $24.20 and 8.60 to place at 36-1.Third choice Mio Me stalked the pace, gained the advantage midstretch and fought the top two to the wire but was third best. Mio Me returned $3.80 to show.Suva Harbor, She’s a Big Winner and Ethan’s Baby completed the order of finish.Avenge earned $46,980, increasing her career bankroll to $126,580.last_img read more

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