Top stories Immigrant bloodlines analyzed illegal petunias destroyed and superstar surgeon fired

first_img(Left to right): AKG-IMAGES/NEWSCOM; ESO/M. Kornmesser; Sukho Song There’s no such thing as a ‘pure’ European—or anyone elseNew studies show that there is no such thing as “pure” European—or anyone else. Almost all of us are the children of repeated ancient migrations, according to researchers who study human origins. Using revolutionary new methods to analyze DNA and the isotopes found in bones and teeth, scientists are exposing the tangled roots of peoples around the world. Few of us are actually the direct descendants of the ancient skeletons found in our backyards or historic homelands. And only a handful of groups today, such as Australian Aborigines, have deep bloodlines untainted by mixing with immigrants.Superstar surgeon fired, again, this time in Russia Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Top stories: Immigrant bloodlines analyzed, illegal petunias destroyed, and superstar surgeon fired again By Ryan CrossMay. 19, 2017 , 1:30 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe After Paolo Macchiarini’s star fell in Sweden, the Italian surgeon still had a place to shine: Russia. The Karolinska Institute in Stockholm fired him in March 2016 for multiple ethical violations, including a breach of “fundamental values” and “scientific negligence.” But Russia had long showered Macchiarini with funding and opportunities to perform his experimental surgeries to implant artificial tracheas, and it allowed him to stay. Now, a year later, his Russian refuge has ended as well.Closest alien world to our solar system could be ripe for life, models suggestCould alien life reside close to our stellar neighborhood? Astronomers are taking that question a bit more seriously as new models increasingly suggest that the closest Earth-like planet to our solar system could be habitable. One research team predicted that it would be possible for the exoplanet Proxima b—orbiting our nearest neighbor star—to harbor liquid water on its surface. Now, another team has taken a climate model designed for Earth and pasted it onto Proxima b and found an even wider range of circumstances in which Proxima b could have liquid water than the earlier study.U.S. flower sellers rush to destroy illegal GE petuniasThe U.S. Department of Agriculture announced this week that U.S. flower distributors have begun to destroy countless petunia plants after federal scientists confirmed that they were genetically engineered (GE) to produce vivid orange, red, and purple blooms. The agency says the flowers pose no risk to the environment or to human health, but GE organisms need special permits to be sold in the United States. Testing continues, but the agency says it has already confirmed nine unwelcome varieties, including ones called African Sunset, Trilogy Mango, and Sweetunia Orange Flash.Gecko-inspired gripper could help robots climb wallsIf you want a robot to pick up a coffee cup, a cherry tomato, or a bag of packaged food, you’ll have to deal with a lot of programming and quite possibly some cleanup in aisle 3. A child can handle all kinds of shapes and materials, and apply the right combination of force and delicacy when lifting them, but getting machines to reproduce these seemingly simple skills hasn’t been easy. Now, a team of researchers has developed a new way to pick up objects that solves many of these problems. Modeled on geckos’ toes, it could also help robots climb irregularly shaped walls.last_img