Using an internet messageboard

first_img Previous Article Next Article Internet messageboards have been around for a long time but can still seemlike a secret society for those who have never taken part in them. This is a shame since they are excellent vehicles for knowledge sharing. Youcan post a message to request help or stimulate debate on a particular subjector respond to something that you have read on the board. They can also act as a vehicle for networked learning (seewww.personneltoday.com). Taking part is simple and we have put together thisguide using the US site www.hr.com as an example. You will find that you haveto register to use most messageboards, but this should only take a few minutes.Sites vary in how much personal information they require – some ask for only ane-mail address and a password, while others will ask for your company name andposition. Once registered, you are free to access the forums. Using an internet messageboardOn 7 May 2002 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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France Takes Over Force Command of EU Navfor Counter Piracy Operation

first_img December 9, 2013 France Takes Over Force Command of EU Navfor Counter Piracy Operation On Friday 6 December, Commodore Peter Lenselink (Royal Netherlands Navy) handed over the Force Command of EU Naval Force (EU NAVFOR) Somalia Operation Atalanta to Contre Amiral Hervé Bléjean (French Navy) during a Change of Command ceremony held on board HNLMS Johan de Witt in the Port of Djibouti.Deputy Operation Commander of EU Naval Force Rear Admiral Jean Martens presided over the handover. The event was also attended by the Head of Mission for EUCAP Nestor, Mr Etienne de Poncins and the Chairman of EU Military Committee, General Patrick de Rousiers.The outgoing Force Commander, Commodore Lenselink, reflected on his time at sea in the flagship. “During the past four months, the European Union Navy Force has continued to be at the forefront in deterring and disrupting piracy. We have provided 100% protection to World Food Programme, AMISOM and other vulnerable shipping and contributed to the monitoring of fishing activities. With EU member state warships and aircraft, together with the Autonomous Vessel Protection Detachment, we have helped to keep the seas safer for seafarers and secured maritime trade routes”The Commodore also stated that counter piracy operations have reached what he calls ‘the next level’. “In recent months the EU Naval Force has been working with the other EU missions in the Horn of Africa: EUCAP Nestor and EUTM Somalia. This has enabled close liaison and training to take place at sea with regional states, including Senior Maritime Security courses, a legal and police seminar, together with Somaliland Coast Guard training. Furthermore, the EU Naval Force flagship hosted the Contact Group on Piracy off the Coast of Somalia during the Piracy Week in Djibouti, with 180 delegates from more than 20 countries and organizations, such as the United Nations, NATO and EU, embarking the ship. We also hosted on board HNLMS Johan de Witt a very special visit from the President of the Somali Federal Government, His Excellency Hassan Sheikh Mohammed.”The new Force Commander, Contre Amiral Hervé Bléjean spoke about his commitment to maintain the pressure on pirate activity. “Pirate attacks have reduced sharply and over the next four months we will remain shoulder to shoulder with the other counter piracy forces to ensure that there is no safe haven for pirates to operate at sea. Whilst I welcome the decline in pirate attacks, I also acknowledge that the piracy threat is not over, as the conditions in Somalia have not improved sufficiently enough. We must adapt with flexibility and agility to the evolving political, operational and tactical circumstances. As part of the European Union’s efforts to strengthen stability and security in the region, I will continue to support and cooperate with staff from EUCAP Nestor and the EU Training Mission Somalia.”The Deputy Operational Commander, Rear Admiral Jean Martens added “It was with great pleasure that I presided over the Force HQ handover today. I would like to thank Commodore Lenselink for his considerable efforts and achievements. As Contre Amiral Hervé Bléjean takes command, I know that the EU Naval Force will continue to apply pressure to the pirates and help build a more stable Somalia.”[mappress]Press Release, December 09, 2013; Image: EU Navfor Back to overview,Home naval-today France Takes Over Force Command of EU Navfor Counter Piracy Operation Share this articlelast_img read more

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Australia, France officially sign Future Submarine deal

first_img View post tag: Australian Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today Australia, France officially sign Australia’s Future Submarine deal View post tag: SEA 1000 Australia, France officially sign Australia’s Future Submarine deal December 20, 2016 “This historic agreement builds on the strength and depth of the Australia-France defence relationship and is another significant step forward for Australia’s Future Submarine program,” Minister Payne said.In April 2016, DCNS was chosen as the prime contractor for the construction of submarines that will cost AUD 50 billion.“The agreement signed today will enable France to transfer cutting-edge skills, knowledge and technology to the Australian Government and Australian industry to achieve a sovereign operational and sustainment submarine capability in Australia,” Payne added.Minister Le Drian said France was committed to working with Australia to deliver a regionally superior sovereign submarine capability. “I am pleased to sign this agreement today and I thank Australia for hosting today’s historic event,” Minister Le Drian said. View post tag: Francecenter_img Australia and France have officially signed an agreement on Australia’s Future Submarine program that will see French shipbuilder DCNS build 12 Shortfin Barracuda submarines for the Australian Navy.Australian Minister for Defence, Senator the Hon Marise Payne and France’s Minister of Defence, Mr Jean-Yves Le Drian, today welcomed the signing of the agreement on December 20. Authorities View post tag: Future Submarine View post tag: DCNS Share this articlelast_img read more

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Senator Braun Embarks on Two-Week ‘Solutions Tour’ Across Indiana

first_imgJASPER, IN – Tomorrow, Senator Mike Braun will launch his two-week Solutions Tour to listen to Hoosiers’ thoughts about lowering prescription drug prices, lowering the cost of higher education, and enacting policies that spur economic growth. A full schedule for the first week is below and all events are open to the press.“In 100 days, I’ve been able to work with President Trump to lower healthcare prices, confirm conservative judicial nominees, and assist in draining the swamp by working to end congressional pensions,” said U.S. Senator Mike Braun. “My Solutions Tour will give me an opportunity to listen to Hoosiers’ thoughts about my work for them and their solutions for fixing Washington and keeping our economy growing.”Senator Braun’s Solutions Tour Stops FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Tuesday, April 16, 2019, at 10:30 AM ETTipton Chamber of Commerce Public EventTipton County Foundation Conference Center1020 West Jefferson StreetTipton, IndianaTuesday, April 16, 2019, at 3:30 PM ETRoundtable with Ivy Tech President Sue Ellspermann and Governor Eric HolcombCulinary and Conference Center2820 N Meridian StreetIndianapolis, IndianaWednesday, April 17, 2019, at 11:30 AM ETTerre Haute Chamber LunchThe Red Barn at Sycamore Farm5001 Poplar StTerre Haute, IndianaWednesday, April 17, 2019, at 4:00 PM ETClay County Coffee HourHoneysuckle Hill Bee-Stro6367 North Murphy RoadBrazil, IndianaThursday, April 18, 2019, at 11:30 AM ETDubois Strong Annual MeetingFerdinand Community Center710 Community DriveFerdinand, IndianaFOOTNOTE: Details for Solutions Tour visits for the week of April 22, 2019 will be released later this next week.  (For the Week of Monday, April 15, 2019, All Events Are Open To The Press)last_img read more

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What to look for at Trump’s impeachment trial

first_imgGAZETTE: The Democrats have argued that if stirring up deadly violence against Congress to prevent the transfer of power doesn’t warrant a president’s impeachment and conviction, then nothing does. Is there any truth to this framing? Is the utility of impeachment as a check on presidential misconduct on the line?SUK GERSEN:  I very much think there is truth to that. If we didn’t have the jurisdictional doubt that some people have and still there’s an acquittal, then I would 100 percent think: What does this really say about impeachment as a mode of accountability for presidents? But the message is a little bit less dire because of the “out” that some senators have by emphasizing the jurisdictional reason for their acquittal vote. On the other hand, that raises some troubling questions about the incentives to save all official wrongdoing for the last minute, knowing that there’s no way one can be held accountable for them. And the situation in which somebody loses an election in November and then they have until January to do all kinds of bad things, that will be a recurring situation and a temptation that we don’t want to put out there.Interview has been edited for clarity and length. Related The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Securing public spaces in the wake of Capitol violence Scholars reflect on how to maintain access to nation’s symbols of democracy Historians and political scientists say still unclear, but more turmoil in near term seems certain SUK GERSEN: Because the Senate has control over how to structure things, it could ask each senator to say what the basis is, but that is not likely to happen. In fact, it will serve many senators to not ask, because they can hide behind the idea that this was a jurisdictional objection as opposed to an objection to the substantive charges. In other words, they could tell themselves or tell others, “Of course, I think what he did was inexcusable. But the prior question was ‘Do we have jurisdiction?’ and so, I used my vote to express my view that we didn’t have jurisdiction to begin with.”GAZETTE: What legal precedents could be established by this trial?SUK GERSEN: We have at least one prior, clear Senate precedent for trying a former official after he has left office. That’s the William Belknap case in 1876. So this will be a second case where the Senate is trying someone after they have left office and furthermore, it’s something one can do not just with an official, but with a president. So after this case, I think it will be harder to say the Senate doesn’t have jurisdiction, even though we’re going to see a whole bunch of senators voting to acquit on that basis.GAZETTE: Could Trump have any criminal liability if in the coming weeks evidence emerges that he funded or helped organize the insurrection, provided material aid like information, or ordered police and the military not to adequately prepare or defend the Capitol in a way that was appropriate given the pre-Jan. 6 intelligence?SUK GERSEN: All of those are big “ifs,” and the question is predicated on “ifs” we haven’t seen established yet but could be. Yes, if there is evidence that he coordinated, that he knew about the attack in advance and took steps to make it more likely to happen, that he purposefully didn’t help to put down the attack while it was going on, or that in advance he made it so that there would be a security failure, that he contributed to that on purpose. Those are very, very big ifs. So far, we don’t know that there’s evidence of that. If law enforcement had evidence of that, perhaps they would have shared it with the public, but perhaps they would not have. So it’s hard to say, but there likely won’t be criminal enforcement activity on this case against Trump without more than what we do know.To me, the main complication is if we find out further evidence that makes the case against Trump stronger than it is now, such that it could become a criminal matter against Trump. And we’ll have had a Senate acquittal, which of course doesn’t technically preclude any criminal indictment, but the country may understand a Senate acquittal to mean “not guilty” for criminal law purposes. And then you’ve got the Biden Justice Department bringing a case anyway? The optics of that would not be good; the social meaning and the political meaning of that would be pretty bad. New approach focuses on cognitive, emotional traits of the radicalized The U.S. Senate will try former President Donald J. Trump Tuesday on charges that he incited the deadly Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol in which hundreds of his supporters ransacked the building, attacked police, and threatened to harm lawmakers who refused to declare him the 2020 election winner.Trump is the first president to be impeached for a second time and will be the first to be tried after leaving office. To convict, House Democrats have the difficult task of persuading two-thirds of the Senate, now evenly split 50-50 between parties, that what Trump did — and didn’t do — in connection with the insurrection was a grave violation of his oath of office and a dereliction of his constitutional duties. They also seek to disqualify him from ever holding public office again. In a memo, Trump’s defense attorneys say the Senate has no authority to try ex-presidents, that he was denied due process in the Jan. 13 impeachment hearing, and that his remarks to backers preceding the attack were protected speech.Jeannie Suk Gersen, J.D. ’02, John H. Watson Jr. Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, specializes in constitutional law and criminal law and is a contributing writer for the New Yorker. She spoke with the Gazette about what’s likely in store and the future precedents the trial could set.Q&AJeannie Suk GersenGAZETTE: Can you put this proceeding into some historical context? How unusual are some of the basic facts of this trial?SUK GERSEN: First of all, the very site of the harm that occurred, which is the insurrection and the attack on the Capitol, the desecration of the Senate chamber, all happened in the exact location of the court of impeachment, namely the Senate. That’s pretty unusual, because in other instances, you wouldn’t have been talking about wrongdoing that is alleged where the actual locale of the harm at issue is the actual building and the room in which the court of impeachment will be considering the evidence. Also, here, the senators were among the parties who experienced the event at issue. So, in some ways, they are all witnesses to the event. They had to be evacuated from the Senate chamber. Another thing that’s unusual but not unprecedented is that the official in question, Donald Trump, is no longer in office. We don’t have an instance in which a president was tried while having left office, but we have instances in which other kinds of officials have been tried after they left office.GAZETTE: Trump’s attorneys and his supporters say that because he’s no longer in office, the trial itself is unconstitutional and point to the fact that no former president has ever been tried as proof of its impropriety. The House impeachment managers argue Trump was impeached while he was still president and for actions he took as president, and that the constitution does not say only sitting presidents can be impeached. Is the constitutionality of this trial still a valid, open legal question?SUK GERSEN: It is a question on which there is debate. The side that says that this is a valid trial even though the president has left office has the better argument. But the other argument, that this is an unconstitutional trial because an impeachment is for the purpose of removing an official, as opposed to punishing them in some other way, that argument is not frivolous. It’s not something you can just toss away as irrelevant. And in fact, the House impeachment managers, when they filed their brief, spent more than one-third of the pages of their brief addressing the constitutionality of holding a trial at all. So clearly, they consider it substantive enough to go into at great length.Professor Jeannie Suk Gersen, J.D. ’02, specializes in constitutional law and criminal law. Courtesy of Harvard Law SchoolGAZETTE: Since 45 of 50 Republican senators have already signaled that they believe it is “unconstitutional” to try a former president, it’s unlikely there will be the 67 votes required to convict. What value does this exercise have if the outcome is already predetermined?SUK GERSEN: I consider that to be a very difficult quandary because how you might have thought of it on Jan. 6 and in the days that followed, when it was possible to remove him from office using impeachment, might be different from how you perceive the costs and benefits now that he’s left office, now that we know that 45 out of 50 Republican Senators are on the record saying that the trial is unconstitutional and therefore, we’re heading for a somewhat clear vote of acquittal. Now that we know that, I think the calculation might change as to what the point of all this is. I can understand people not being willing to just say, “We’re going to drop it now as a result of his having left office.” Imagine if a president did all kinds of very, very bad things on the very last day in office. Does that mean there’s no recourse, and there’s no accountability that the Congress can seek? That doesn’t make any sense just as a matter of common sense. So, on that view, it is responsible for the Senate to go ahead with the trial and hear the evidence, even knowing that there’s going to be an acquittal at the end of it.But I also see and worry very much about the other side of the argument, and at some moments, I think the other side of the argument is better. Which is: After we see allegations of this extremely serious nature that go to the very fundamental idea of our democracy and a president’s role in it, we should avoid having an acquittal because, of course, it’s going to create a message and the ability to say: “You see. The Senate didn’t think he did anything wrong.” And all of the theories of election fraud that we know to be false will have further life through the meaning of an acquittal that people are able to imbue.GAZETTE: What do the briefs suggest about what to expect from each side?SUK GERSEN: Given the [briefs for] the two sides disagree on the facts, and their context and meaning, there will be debate among the senators about what evidence should be presented. And of course we can say, “We know the facts. We all watched the news and watched it happen in real time.” But what we watched is CNN or Fox News or news reporting about it. There are things that much of the American public doesn’t know about in detail. So I think there will be debate about how much video evidence — especially if it seems pretty damning or if it will cause people to have a strong reaction — and how prejudicial it might be toward Trump, and how probative it is. There will be debate about whether it should be kept out. There are no preexisting and binding rules here about what evidence will be allowed. The Senate gets to decide. In the first impeachment, we had no testimony and that could happen this time. We could see a trial that’s very short: Perhaps because there’s going to be an acquittal, we don’t need to drag it out. Or, we could see a trial that’s longer: Precisely because there’s going to be an acquittal, this is the only chance to really communicate to the American people the facts and meaning of what happened.GAZETTE: Since getting 17 Republican senators to convict appears out of reach, does that incentivize the Democrat House managers to use their time as an opportunity to lay out their case in as vivid detail as they can to see if they can at least persuade the public, who may then pressure their own elected officials?SUK GERSEN: They might do that. And what’s very worrisome about it is, after all that, no matter how damning that evidence could be, and how serious the offense is, if you get an acquittal, that’s a “not guilty” in terms of how it will be received by half the country. Do we want to have that happen, where days and days of extremely damning evidence is presented and then it’s a not guilty? Or, do we want those facts to really come to light anyway, so that the public has a chance to consider it? Whatever happens in the court of impeachment will have meaning for the American public in terms of how they think the rightness or wrongness of what occurred should be assessed.GAZETTE: In their brief, the House managers cite the necessity to impeach and convict as both a punishment to Trump, but also as a deterrent for future presidents. If Trump is acquitted, does that effectively render the charge “incitement to insurrection or rebellion” by a future president no longer an impeachable offense?SUK GERSEN: No, I don’t think so. Many senators may be voting to acquit because they don’t think that the Senate has jurisdiction to try him. So I don’t think that we’re going to be able to read any acquittal in a substantive way to say that future presidents can do this.GAZETTE: Will we know whether someone’s vote to acquit is based on the merits of the case or on this jurisdictional issue? “Whatever happens in the court of impeachment will have meaning for the American public in terms of how they think the rightness or wrongness of what occurred should be assessed.” Where are we now after a second impeachment? Bacow, Harvard faculty, students call for affirmation of American principles What prompted Capitol rioters to violence? Concern over storming of the Capitollast_img read more

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An Open Letter to Customers and Partners

first_imgWelcome to Dell Technologies, a unique family of businesses that provides the essential infrastructure for your organization to build its digital future, transform IT and protect your most important asset – information.The largest parts of Dell Technologies will be very familiar to you. Our Client Solutions business, and our most well-known business, will continue to be known simply as Dell. Our Infrastructure Solutions business, a real powerhouse in data center infrastructure, brings together the very best of Dell and EMC and will be known as Dell EMC. We have the services to provide strategic guidance and expertise to ensure you get the very best outcome from your investments, and we’re committed to providing you with unparalleled service and support.  With that in mind, for now, there will be no change to your support interactions, processes, resources or contacts.Read more on DellTechnologies.com.last_img read more

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Contraception advocacy group petitions Jenkins

first_imgIrish 4 Reproductive Health (I4RH), an on-campus group at Notre Dame advocating for accessibility to all forms of FDA-approved contraception, submitted a petition Monday to University President Fr. John Jenkins asking for clarification on several points related to recent University policy changes regarding contraception.Sophomore Anne Jarrett, a member of I4RH, said in an email the petition was created with the hope of addressing ambiguous portions of the University’s policies.“The petition calls for an end to the ambiguity concerning the several changes to the University’s policy on health care which relates to birth control, IVF and contraception,” she said. “We believe students deserve to know exactly what the health insurance policy they pay for will cover in advance, instead of being kept in the dark.”The petition itself asked for clarity on five points — the first of which asked the cost of contraception and how much of that cost is covered by insurance. The second point addressed discrepancies in the policies between undergraduate students and graduate students. The third focused on which specific birth control methods are affected by the policy changes, and the fourth was related to the removal of “emergency contraception.” The fifth and last point concerned the freedom of conscience for those who use birth control.Kate Bermingham, a graduate student and member of I4RH, said in an email that the group is frustrated with the new policies related to contraception.“We’ve been pretty disappointed at how the changes have been handled and we are tired of the lack of clear information being provided by the University about what will and will not be covered,” she said. “I4RH’s position is that we need access to all FDA-approved methods of birth control. We think no student or employee should ever have to choose between the birth control method that’s best for their needs and what they can afford.”Becca Fritz, a senior and IR4H member, said in an email the group’s focus is to advocate for “comprehensive and accessible reproductive healthcare” for the campus community.“Our work centers around promoting discussion about this issue, calling attention to the University’s irresponsible handling of the insurance policy change and making condoms and dental dams accessible to people who need them,” Fritz said.IR4H is “an independent group of Notre Dame students,” Jarrett explained. She said the group is not seeking an association with the Student Activities Office, but it has been in contact with administrators.Bermingham said these administrators include dean of the graduate school, Laura Carlson, and Ann Firth, Jenkins’ chief of staff. Some of the group’s other advocacy activities have included two condom distributions and letters to The Observer.Sophomore Sam Kennedy, another member of the group, said in an email he thinks the group’s mission has generally been received positively on campus.“Many of my male friends in my dorm were enthusiastically in support of my work with the condom distribution,” he said. “They loved that someone was finally stepping up to address the issue of sexual health on this campus, and were ready and willing to take on some of the burden of safe sex and reproductive health through the use of condoms. We definitely brightened a lot of people’s days with the condom distribution. There were certainly a few disgruntled passers-by, but the overwhelming majority of people were delighted, thankful and overall positive in their reactions to seeing us. For me, the happiness we brought to people that day was one of the best things about the event.”Bermingham said 139 individuals, mainly current students and alumni, signed the petition itself. The administration has not responded to the petition yet, Jarrett said, but the group hopes to use the community’s response to the petition to “demand one.” In the text of the petition, I4RH requested a response from the administration by Friday, May 4.Tags: condoms, Contraception, Irish 4 Reproductive Health, petition, University President Fr. John Jenkinslast_img read more

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Paris Production of Phantom in Jeopardy After Fire Breaks Out

first_img The Phantom of the Opera View Comments from $29.00 Broadway.com has confirmed that the Mogador Theatre in Paris, where the new French version of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s The Phantom of the Opera was set to open on October 13, has been struck by fire overnight. A fireman was hurt battling the blaze, which is now under control, according to TV5.It is not yet known when or if performances of the 30th anniversary production, which was to be led by three-time Broadway.com Audience Choice Award winner Sierra Boggess, will start.”(It is) difficult to estimate the time needed for the repairs at the moment,” a spokesperson said in a statement. The fire’s cause is currently unknown.Boggess, who has been called by Lloyd Webber his “best Christine,” departed the composer’s latest Broadway hit, School of Rock, to lead the production, in French.Phantom continues to run in London at Her Majesty’s Theatre and on Broadway at the Majestic.center_img Related Shows Sierra Boggess in ‘Phantom of the Opera'(Photo: Matthew Murphy)last_img read more

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U.S. Donates Interception Vessels to Colombian Navy

first_imgBy Julieta Pelcastre/Diálogo August 27, 2018 The U.S. presented the Colombian Navy with five new 380X Defender interception boats and a 410 Apostle at the port of Cartagena, Colombia, June 20, 2018. The vessels will support maritime patrol efforts in the Pacific and Caribbean to counter transnational crime. Colombia expects two more boats by the end of 2018. “The U.S. government-donated vessels will increase the Coast Guard’s effectiveness in the pursuit and detention of vessels used in narcotrafficking and other illicit activities at sea, while also guaranteeing human security and preserving the country’s natural resources,” Commander Javier Bermúdez, head of the Colombian Navy’s Coast Guard Command, told Diálogo. “In late 2016, top military officers of both countries started the planning and approval processes for the boats.” The Defender, built by U.S. manufacturer SAFE Boats International, is a quick, rust-resistant vessel, equipped with technology to enhance its speed and performance and superior ability to make sharp turns at high speed. The 410 Apostle’s detection systems feature the latest technology. The boat’s superior operational performance adapts to the needs of Colombian coasts and seas, while its three engines make it ideal for high-speed pursuits. “We are currently moving the units to the Pacific and North Caribbean areas. Some [boats] go to San Andrés, our island area,” said Cmdr. Bermúdez. “The allocation plan will conclude in August 2018. A week after this, we should get the vessels’ first results against narcotrafficking.” The Coast Guard Command’s interception boat fleet will have 18 Defenders and 14 Apostles. Vessel distribution is based on maritime climate conditions in areas under the Colombian Navy’s jurisdiction. Cutting edge “Coast Guard units are the cutting-edge technology that gives us integrated maritime security. They also allow us to control and monitor the sea to neutralize any criminal activity at sea,” Cmdr. Bermúdez said. “Today, terrorist and criminal organizations involved in narcotrafficking change and adapt to military forces’ efforts against them.” According to Cmdr. Bermúdez, the technology allowed the Navy to obtain important results in recent years. In 2017, naval authorities seized about 180 tons of cocaine hydrochloride. Cooperation bridges Maritime interdiction is among the main tools to keep drug trafficking from reaching international markets. Colombia conducts more than 56 percent of maritime interdictions in South America. Most of the cocaine reaching North America, 90 percent, comes from Colombia, according to a July 2017 publication from the Colombian Navy’s International Maritime Center against Drug Trafficking. “The United States has been the most important partner for Colombia in the fight against transnational organized crime, through different instruments and cooperation mechanisms,” said Aníbal Fernández de Soto, Colombian Defense Deputy Minister for International Affairs and Policy, in a statement. “They were strengthened and perfected over time and have allowed Colombia to become an international benchmark today.” “If we stick together, we can have very successful outcomes,” U.S. Navy Admiral Kurt W. Tidd, commander of U.S. Southern Command, told the Defense Writers’ Group in Washington, D.C., June 2018. Today, Colombia is “a modern, thriving, capable partner. The security challenges are still there, but they understand the challenges and they are taking the steps to continue to deal with them.” Far from limited to narcotrafficking, cooperation tools and mechanisms also focus on terrorism, disaster response, and international operations and exercises. “This kind of relationship allows us to build bridges of communication. The joint combined doctrine creates security protocols to help and provide better security in our area of influence in the Caribbean and the Colombian Pacific,” Cmdr. Bermúdez said. The Defender and Apostle boats are part of a larger support package from the U.S. government. Other examples are the International Coast Guard School, meant to develop maritime interdiction skills, and the International Maritime Center against Drug Trafficking, a research facility to study narcotrafficking at sea in depth. “[We seek to] strengthen the support of partner nations, such as the United States, so that we can get that comprehensive maritime security we want for the region through joint work,” Cmdr. Bermúdez said.last_img read more

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Trump’s lack of trade policy took the U.S. out of the world discussion. What’s Biden do now?

first_imgNow it’s up to Joe Biden’s team to figure out how to sort all of that back out again, and nobody is quite sure how much sorting it is going to take, or whether the long-lasting damage will become, in the end, a permanent shift of power. Over the weekend the “world’s largest trade deal,” the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership, was inked between 15 Asian nations, including China, Japan, and South Korea. For the most part, it is limited to slashing the region’s tariffs; the United States’ own priorities of intellectual property protection, minimal worker or environmental protections and the like aren’t taken on. Experts, however, see it as another sign that the world is moving on from a time when the United States was the singular world-dominant trade and diplomatic force.If the United States isn’t going to involve itself in trade deals, it’s not that trade deals won’t be happening. They just won’t include us.What happens next, then, is a bit of a mystery. Biden is a union supporter and is expected to center labor concerns in any forthcoming trade pacts. Climate considerations will also play a big role, as they should for team It’d Be Nice To Keep Being Alive In General. It’s likely Biden’s team will attempt to rejoin world partnerships, possibly after a rather lengthy apology tour for you-know-what.- Advertisement – What’s less clear is whether the United States still has the clout to pull off agreements quite as much to our liking as we did even a decade ago. We remain an economic power; when it comes to raw diplomacy, however, we ran up quite the deficit in the Trump years. After going from Clinton to Bush to Obama to Trump to Biden, cough, it feels like the rest of the world is losing a bit of patience in trying to decipher just what the hell is going on over here. Everyone else in the administration was left to their own devices, which meant a department-by-department hodgepodge of lobbyist-friendly looting, arch-conservative destroy-the-governmentism, and one guy who carried a whip around the office to threaten the people doing the actual work. That was the unsaid agenda of all involved: When at all possible, be an enormous asshole. There was no particular rationale behind it, but all of conservatism seems to require being an asshole as general device and strategy. It’s why Steve Bannon made it into the Oval Office, and why Steve Bannon is now fending off an indictment for fraud.When it came to trade policy, all of these sub-ideologies came together with some base-friendly racism, and behold: The Donald Trump trade policy consisted of not having a trade policy. Nations that pissed him off for some reason would be slapped with tariffs. The Obama-era Trans-Pacific Partnership was axed. That was it. Secretary of state so-and-so and his replacement traveled the world, their jobs made easy by the knowledge that literally anything they did or said would be undone by Trump a few days later for the purposes of his own momentary pleasure, and that was it. There were no new deals, only tariffs and retaliatory tariffs. And then, the pandemic.- Advertisement –center_img – Advertisement –last_img read more

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