Could Alex Dunbar be back in Scotland’s blue sooner than we expect?

first_imgA revolutionary knee-surgery technique could have been be the answer to Alex Dunbar’s and Scotland’s problems, writes Richard Bath. When strong-running Scotland centre Alex Dunbar damaged his knee two days before the Calcutta Cup, it was a devastating blow for Scottish rugby. Not only did one of the standout backs of the championship miss the Twickenham game, but the diagnosis of a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament has put his participation in this autumn’s World Cup in grave doubt given that the injury requires surgery, and a six-to-nine-month recovery period. However, this needn’t have been the case.Dunbar underwent an ACL reconstruction this month, but he could have gone for a ground-breaking surgical technique pioneered by a former Scottish Rugby Union surgeon, Professor Gordon Mackay. The technique is changing the prognosis for injured rugby players such as Dunbar. The use of Mackay’s internal brace technology could accelerate a player like Dunbar’s recovery period to the point where they is back playing before the end of the season. As it stands, Dunbar will struggle to be anywhere near peak fitness by the time Scotland take on Japan at Kingsholm on 23 September.The technique involves inserting small biodegradeable screws into the bone either side of the affected joint, and connecting them with what is effectively a tiny bungee cord made of a super-strong polymer. The brace stabilises the joint and allows the patient to begin light exercise within a week, and because there’s no plaster cast and none of the usual loss of muscle condition, instead of taking 16-24 weeks to recover full function after a conventional ligament/tendon reconstruction, an internal brace will bring that time down to an average of 8-12 weeks. Not only that, but because of the lack of grafts, injured sportsmen who have undergone an operation using an internal brace will not experience the arthritis associated with traditional reconstructions, in later life.Although Mackay has found that the technique works on high impact sports such as judo, skiing and football, with clients fast-tracked back into action including skier Alain Baxter, footballer Craig Moore and Olympic judoka Gemma Gibbons, his first internal brace patient was a young Scottish rugby player, and the results in rugby have been consistently stunning. Take, for instance, young Hawick three-quarter Rory Hutton, who sustained grade three ligament damage to his ankle during a BT Premiership league match. After a prompt operation in which professor Mackay inserted an internal brace, Hutton was running three weeks later at 50% body weight on an anti-gravity treadmill, and played a league match for the Borders club eight weeks to the day after he was taken off on a stretcher.Wounded Warrior: Glasgow will miss Dunbar’s presence during the coming weeks. (Photo: Inpho)Perhaps even more remarkable is the case of another Scottish player, Nick Binning of Hillfoots, who suffered what would once have been a catastrophic, career-ending knee dislocation that was further complicated by severe internal damage to three ligaments plus a fractured bone. Instead of taking a year off – which is the minimum amount of time to recover from such an injury, if indeed the player ever recovered – Binning was back running after seven weeks, a remarkable testament to Mackay’s skills. Although Mackay operates across most sports – as well as the SRU, he has worked with Rangers and Celtic football clubs, Scotland’s Olympians via his tie-up with the Scottish Institute of Sport, and was on duty at both the Commonwealth Games and Ryder Cup – rugby remains uniquely placed to benefit from his new technique, as Dunbar may well find out in the coming weeks…For more information, and videos of reconstructions and rehab, see www.mackayclinic.co.ukcenter_img Alex the great: Dunbar had become a major force for Scotland before injury struck. (Photo: Action Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Hotshot: Ospreys and Wales U20 centre Tiaan Thomas-Wheeler

first_imgHis first sporting honours came in cricket but now Tiaan Thomas-Wheeler is focused on rugby LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Ospreys and Wales U20 centre Tiaan Thomas-Wheeler Date of birth 19 November 1999 Born Neath Region Ospreys Country Wales Position CentreWhen did you first play?I was about five and my brother’s U8s team at Bryncoch were short so asked me to play. I played there until U11 and then stopped for a while before starting back at youth level with Trebanos.I was big into cricket and represented Wales from U11-U17. Then after a year of being back in rugby at Trebanos I got picked by Ospreys U16 so I had to choose. I’ve been with the Ospreys ever since and have just got my first professional contract.Why did you pick rugby?Growing up in Wales there’s such a big rugby culture; my father played rugby, my brother and my grandfather played. I just feel rugby was sort of destined to happen.Did you play other sports? Football was a big part of my life and I’ve transferred a lot of that into rugby. There are so many skills in football – eye for a gap, footwork – that transfer. I was a striker in football and a batter in cricket – I think I enjoy the pressure.What positions have you played? Centre is what I enjoy most but I’ve also played full-back and fly-half. I see 12 as my position now. I like the pressure; you need physicality but also ball skills and to make decisions to put people into space.You made your Ospreys debut at 18… This article originally appeared in the October 2019 issue of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.center_img It was in the Anglo-Welsh Cup against Gloucester and everything happened so quickly. I was a travelling reserve, then someone pulled out before the game so I was on the bench, then all of a sudden I was on the pitch. It’s the best thing to have happened because you have no time to be nervous.Any childhood heroes?I had lots from different sports. Kevin Pietersen for cricket, Ronaldo in football and James Hook rugby-wise. They’re pretty much all mavericks. I enjoy trying new things and doing things a little differently.What’s your rugby highlight?Scoring a try against New Zealand at the Junior World Cup. We wanted to play the best and when we beat New Zealand it was almost as if we’d won the World Cup.What are your goals for this season?Just playing as many first-team games as I can for the Ospreys.What do you do away from rugby? I’ve just finished my personal training qualification and if I’m not playing sport, I’m normally watching it.RW VERDICT: A dual age-grade international who pays tribute to his family’s support, he is highly rated in Welsh circles – hence the Ospreys signing him on a senior contract as a teenager. Should get lots of regional game time in 2019-20. Centre point: Tiaan Thomas-Wheeler in action for Wales U20 (Getty Images) last_img read more

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Virginia announces slate of six for bishop suffragan election

first_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET House of Bishops Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK February 3, 2012 at 5:56 pm I am curious as to when, if ever, we will see a Deacon or Archdeacon’s name on the shortlist of candidates. I believe that there have been Bishops (even a Pope) who were Deacons when they were consecrated. Wasn’t St. Francis a Deacon as well? I don’t think our Lord would have any objections. Comments are closed. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Elections, Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID By ENS staffPosted Feb 3, 2012 Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virginia announces slate of six for bishop suffragan election Rector Smithfield, NC [Episcopal News Service] Six priests have been nominated to stand for election to become bishop suffragan in the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia.They are:The Rev. Randy Alexander, 45, rector, Christ Church, Pelham (Diocese of New York);The Rev. Canon Susan Goff, 58, canon to the ordinary, Diocese of Virginia;The Very Rev. David May, 52, rector, Grace Church, Kilmarnock (Diocese of Virginia);The Very Rev. Dr. Hilary Smith, 43, rector, St. Paul’s on-the-Hill, Winchester (Diocese of Virginia);The Very Rev. Shirley Smith Graham, 43, rector, St. Martin’s Episcopal Church, Williamsburg (Diocese of Southern Virginia); andThe Rev. Canon Sue Sommer, 55, subdean and canon pastor, Grace & Holy Trinity Cathedral (Diocese of West Missouri).The six nominees were selected from an initial field of 78 names submitted to the Nominating Committee, according to a diocesan press release. “Of these, 38 agreed to enter into the discernment process with us. Through careful and prayerful discernment, the committee then narrowed the potential nominees over the course of several months through a review of submitted documents, telephone interviews, travel to visit potential nominees and a discernment retreat,” the release said.Additional nominations by petition will be accepted until Feb. 13.All nominees will participate in a series of meetings March 19-23 to provide the diocese with the opportunity to meet, hear from and talk with the candidates.The bishop suffragan will be elected April 21 at St. George’s Episcopal Church in Fredericksburg. The consecration is scheduled for July 28 at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Richmond.The person selected as bishop suffragan will assist Bishop Shannon Johnston in the leadership of the diocese.Since the election falls within 120 days of the start of the July 4-12 meeting of the Episcopal Church’s General Convention, that body must consent to the bishop-elect’s ordination.The Diocese of Virginia includes 180 congregations, six schools, two diocesan centers and six diocesan homes throughout 38 counties of central, northern and northwestern Virginia. The diocese also is home to the largest Anglican seminary in the world, Virginia Theological Seminary. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Robert L. Sherwood says: Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tags Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments (1) Rector Martinsville, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY last_img read more

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Becas educacionales teológicas concedidas a Episcopales, Anglicanos en el Caribe…

first_imgBecas educacionales teológicas concedidas a Episcopales, Anglicanos en el Caribe y América Latina Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA [Oficial de Asuntos Públicos] La Comisión de Educación Teológica para América Latina y el Caribe (CETALC) ha otorgado 34 becas en cinco categorías por más de 366.000 dólares para apoyar las necesidades de educación y formación teológica de la Iglesia en América Latina y el Caribe.Las becas fueron aprobadas por el Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal en su reunión de enero.CETALC se formó después del cierre del Seminario Episcopal del Caribe en 1976, localizado en Puerto Rico. En ese momento, el Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal estableció el Fondo Fiduciario para la Educación Teológica para América Latina y el Caribe, con los fondos provenientes de la venta de la propiedad destinados a apoyar los programas de educación teológica de las diócesis que utilizaban el seminario.Las seis categorías de las becas de CETALC son: programas diocesanos, programas provinciales y regionales, la educación continua, los estudios de postgrado, la investigación y la producción, y Leonardo Romero.Programas diocesanos• Colombia   $13,500.00• Costa Rica     15,000.00• Cuba      13,500.00• Cuernavaca     13,500.00• Ecuador Central    10,200.00• Ecuador Litoral    11,000.00• El Salvador     11,000.00• Guatemala     13,500.00• Haití      15,000.00• Honduras     15,000.00• Islas Vírgenes     12,000.00• Meridional Porto Alegre     6,000.00• México       7,500.00• Norte de México    13,000.00• Occidente de México    13,000.00• Panamá     11,400.00• Puerto Rico     15,000.00• República Dominicana           13,500.00• Río de Janeiro     14,000.00• Sureste de México    13,500.00• Venezuela     11,000.00Programas provinciales y regionalesIARCA – CAETS (Centro Anglicano de Estudios Teológicos Superiores).  $32,500.00La educación continua • Jorge Urrutia Castro de Costa Rica  $5,000.00• Luís Hernán Palacios de Colombia    1,000.00• Ofelia Correa de Colombia           600.00• Sam Dessordi de Brasil     5,000.00• Sergio León de Colombia      1,000.00• Washington Villamarín de Ecuador Central   5,000.00Estudios de postgrado• Asdrúbal Toledo Izquierdo de Cuba  $5,000.00Investigación y producción de recursos teológicos• Clara Luz Ajo de Cuba    $5,000.00• James H. Ottley de Cuernavaca México    5,000.00• Luis A. Olivetta de México Occidental    3,000.00Trabajo administrativo• CETALC     $25,000.00• CIAET       12,500.00MembresíaLos siguientes son miembros de  CETALC:• La Iglesia Episcopal: Obispo Víctor Scantlebury de Ecuador Central.• México: Obispo Lino Rodríguez Amaro; Sarai Osnaya, secretaria de CETALC• IARCA: El Revdmo. Armando Guerra Soria, presidente de CETALC; Sandra Cardona• Provincia IX: Obispo Francisco Duque de Colombia; Rev. Vaike Madisson, CETALC vice-presidente• Brasil: Obispo Filadelfo Oliveira de Río de Janeiro• Cuba: La Rev. Dra. Marienela De La Paz• Haití: El Rev. Alexander Soner• Islas Vírgenes: Rosalie Simmonds Ballantine, Esq.• Ex-Oficio: Amanda De La Cruz, tesorera de CETALC• Staff: Obispo Wilfrido Ramos; la Rev. Glenda McQueenPara ulterior información contacte a McQueen a [email protected] inglés:  http://bit.ly/yn3qmq Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ Posted Feb 28, 2012 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS center_img Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ last_img read more

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Los oficios de la Convención General utilizarán diversas fuentes

first_img Rector Albany, NY Por Sharon SheridanPosted Jun 8, 2012 Press Release Service General Convention, Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Collierville, TN El icono de Nuestra Señora de Vladimir, que aparece aquí en el programa de un oficio de la Convención, también será parte de un retablo del altar en la Convención General.[Episcopal News Service] Los oficios de culto en la Convención General serán una demostración de la diversidad de la liturgia y la música provenientes de todo el ámbito de la Iglesia Episcopal.“Es una combinación de todo lo que la Iglesia Episcopal tiene a su disposición que haya sido aprobado”, dijo el Rdo. Charles Dupree, rector de la iglesia episcopal de La Trinidad [Trinity Episcopal Church] en Bloomington, Indiana, y copresidente del comité de planificación de cultos de la Convención.La Eucaristía se celebrará diariamente, con diferentes oficios que usarán formatos tomados de fuentes tales como Enriching Our Worship [Enriqueciendo nuestro culto] o del Rito 1 y Rito 2 del Libro de oración Común. La música provendrá del Himnario  [The Hymnal] de 1982, del segundo volumen de Lift Every Voice and Sing; de Wonder, Love and Praise, así como de Voices Found, El Himnario y Flor y Canto, compendios de música en español, estos dos últimos.Entre los músicos habrá desde organistas a un coro haitiano pasando por el intérprete de una flauta indígena [nativoamericana]. Los programas se imprimirán en inglés y en alguna otra lengua -español la mayoría de los días, en hmong y en shoshone el 6 y el 9 de julio respectivamente, dijo Dupree.Los participantes en los oficios serán diversos también.“Aspiramos a diversidades de todo tipo”, dijo el Rdo. Sandy Webb, asesor litúrgico de la Convención y asociado al rector de la iglesia episcopal de San Juan [St. John’s] en Roanoke, Virginia. Esto incluye “diversidad de órdenes de ministerio, de manera que tengamos laicos, obispos, presbíteros y diáconos representados en todos los oficios.“Queremos diversidad geográfica de todos los rincones de nuestra Iglesia”, dijo Webb. El comité también aspira a la diversidad en edad, en etnicidad y en capacidad física.“Intentamos abarcar todo el panorama de la Iglesia Episcopal”, apuntó él.Las liturgias mismas serán “eucaristías sencillas”, dijo Dupree. “El objetivo para la concepción de estas liturgias es que constituyan una fuerza estabilizadora dentro del funcionamiento de la Convención”.“La liturgia, si bien se supone que sea atractiva, interesante y estimulante, debe ser también familiar y elemental”, agregó. “En consecuencia, mi esperanza es que [la celebración litúrgica] será un lugar donde la gente pueda ir y encontrar su centro… y al mismo tiempo un recordatorio de cómo el Espíritu se ha movido y se mueve a través de la obra de la Iglesia”.La Eucaristía diaria se celebrará en el salón de fiestas del hotel J.W. Marriott, conectado con el centro de la Convención a través de un paso elevado, en lugar de un salón de exposiciones del centro. Según la página web de la Convención General, esto ahorra el costo de alquilar un salón sólo para cultos y ensayos, y era necesario debido al presupuesto reducido de la Convención que se aprobó en 2009.Los asientos estarán dispuestos “estilo teatro”, con una plataforma central para el altar, añadió Dupree. Y luego diseñamos un retablo que elegimos de alguna iconografía antigua con algunos elementos modernos”. El icono de Nuestra Señora de Vladimir -que también aparece en la cubierta del programa- será “el punto focal, de manera que pueda, esperemos, infundirle a todo el salón un ambiente de misterio”.Cada oficio, excepto la Eucaristía del 8 de julio y la reunión de la OUG, conmemorarán vidas de santos tomadas [del calendario] Mujeres Santas, Hombres Santos, revisión de Fiestas menores y ayunos [Lesser Feasts and Fasts] que ahora se encuentra en uso experimental.Se conmemorarán [las vidas de] Walter Rauschenbusch, Washington Gladden y Jacob Riis el 5 de julio; la de Juan Hus el 6 de julio; la de Harriet Beecher Stowe el 7 de julio; la de Samson Occum día 9; la de Bartolomé de las Casas el 10; la de Benito de Nursia el día 11 y la de Soderblom el 12.El 9 de julio es “también un día que le hemos pedido a la Comisión Permanente sobre Iglesias Pequeñas que trate de crear una liturgia que se refiera a la concepción e implementación de liturgias en nuestras congregaciones más pequeñas”, añadió Dupree. “Muchas de nuestras iglesias son increíblemente pequeñas y no contamos con los recursos de algunas de las congregaciones más grandes en lo que respecta al acceso a diferentes instrumentos y diferentes tipos de coros”.La dificultad era que una Eucaristía de la Convención General es cualquier cosa menos pequeña.“¿Cómo creas la experiencia de una iglesia pequeña con 2.000 personas? Reunimos un grupo de sacerdotes y músicos parroquiales de la Diócesis de Indianápolis que sirven en congregaciones pequeñas, y nos dimos a la tarea de hacer justamente eso”, agregó Dupree.Los instrumentos musicales para la ocasión incluirán un dulcémele percutido, un salterio y una guitarra, explicó. “La idea en torno a eso es que puedes aportar los talentos que tengas y, en los contextos adecuados, pueden resultar muy efectivos y conmovedores”.Por coincidir con la conmemoración de Occum, también participará un músico que toca una flauta indígena. “Ése también es un instrumento muy bello”, afirmó Dupree. “No tiene que ser complejo. En verdad podemos utilizar instrumentos sencillos y, hecho con alguna idea y cuidado, pueden ser muy, pero muy efectivos”.El 9 de julio también figurará [en el programa] un coro voluntario de obispos y sus cónyuges.“Una de las cosas que siempre he tratado de animarles a hacer, a las iglesias pequeñas, ha sido la de localizar y desarrollar los recursos locales”, dijo Marilyn Kaiser, directora y copresidente del comité de música de La Trinidad. “De ahí que calculara que los recursos locales en la Convención General, entre otras muchas cosas, sería también el de los obispos a quienes les gusta cantar y sus cónyuges”.La Eucaristía dominical usará la “Misa Guadalupe”, una versión de la misa de Joel Martinson que alterna el latín y el español, dijo Kaiser.Los músicos para ese oficio incluirán un quinteto de metales, un coro combinado de cantantes de la Diócesis de Indianápolis y un coro de Haití, explicó ella.A través de la Convención, actuarán varios coros, organistas y otros instrumentistas y harán música en estilos que van desde himnos tradicionales a cánticos espirituales [afroamericanos] y cantos de [la comunidad monástica de] Taizé. Los versos del Aleluya provendrá del himnario Flor y canto. Varios músicos, entre ellos Dupree, han compuesto versiones musicales  para los salmos que se cantarán diariamente. El 11 de julio se celebrará un oficio por el Rito 1 con la participación del coro de niñas y hombres de la iglesia catedral de Cristo [Christ Church Cathedral] de Indianápolis, “en el que habrá muchísimos cantos muy tradicionales para el preludio”, señaló Kaiser.“Realmente, hemos intentado tener una buena variedad, una buena representación de etnicidad dentro de la Iglesia Episcopal”, agregó Kaiser, quien también tocará el órgano en la Eucaristía de apertura el 9 de julio.“Creo que habrá un buen equilibrio de la música tradicional de la Iglesia, las cosa nuevas, y luego montones de instrumentos”, afirmó. “Esperamos que resultará inspirador.  No hay nada tan emocionante como cantar con varios miles de personas, es sencillamente maravilloso”.En tanto el comité trabajó para ajustar la música y la liturgia de cada día -usando, por ejemplo, tambores nativoamericanos para una “música de reunión” y el instrumentista de una flauta indígena nativoamericana durante el oficio en conmemoración de Occum- los oficios individuales no se han dirigido a “grupos” particulares, señaló Webb. “Partimos de un concepto, y lo hemos mantenido durante las últimas convenciones generales, que lo consideramos como una ‘liturgia mezclada’”.El que preside la celebración podría hacer parte de la plegaria eucarística en francés, mientras un lector podría leer una de las lecciones en una lengua nativoamericana, agregó. “En el curso de la liturgia, nos moveremos sin problemas entre tres y cuatro idiomas”.El objetivo, dijo, es “mostrar que el cuerpo de Cristo no está compuesto por partes separadas, sino por un todo coherente, en que todas las partes son diversas”.Entre tanto, él está ocupado con la logística práctica de planificar los oficios en que participarán miles de personas. Durante el culto, él usa una radio para mantenerse conectado con los que dirigen el oficio.  Se reúne diariamente en la Convención con un equipo de adoración que mantiene las cosas funcionando sin complicaciones. En la actualidad, se ocupa de los contratos con la panadería y la bodega de vinos local para el cuarto de tonelada de pan y las 16 cajas de vino que se necesitan.“Con un poco de suerte, todo lo que consumiremos será de Indiana”, afirmó.— Sharon Sheridan es corresponsal de ENS. Traducción de Vicente Echerri.En inglés: http://bit.ly/LmPmbC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tags Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI General Convention 2012 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Los oficios de la Convención General utilizarán diversas fuentes Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ last_img read more

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Falls Church Anglicans appeal to state Supreme Court

first_imgFalls Church Anglicans appeal to state Supreme Court [Episcopal News Service] The last of seven breakaway congregations that had legal disputes with the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia and the Episcopal Church has sought permission to appeal a judge’s order that it return control of certain church property to the diocese.The Falls Church Anglican Church, as the Convocation of Anglicans in North America (CANA) congregation is known, filed its appeal petition June 1.It is contesting Fairfax County Circuit Court Judge Randy I. Bellows’ March 1 order that it return to the diocese the parish’s real property, approximately $2.8 million contributed by its members prior to 2007, and most of its tangible personal property such as bibles, hymnals and furniture.Virginia Attorney General Kenneth Cuccinelli also on June 1 filed a brief in support of the church’s request for review of the trial court’s treatment of donations. Cuccinelli says in the brief that he was entering the case “to protect the public interest in honoring the wishes of donors to charitable institutions.”Bellows’ order was meant to enforce his Jan. 10 opinion in which he said that some personal property, including monetary gifts, given to the congregations prior to January 31, 2007, belongs to the diocese.Bellows’ ruling allowed the CANA congregations to retain some restricted funds over which they have no discretion and that do not benefit the local congregation, the diocese or the Episcopal Church.In May diocesan Secretary Henry D.W. Burt wrote to diocesan members expressing “disappointment” that the diocese had not been able to reach a final settlement with Falls Church Anglican and predicting that the congregation might seek to appeal. He noted that the other six CANA congregations had one by one agreed to return the church property, including personal property and Episcopal funds due the Diocese of Virginia, and to withdraw their appeal efforts. Burt outlined in his letter a schedule that anticipates the Virginia Supreme Court deciding whether to take the appeal in the fall.In a press release issued the day of its appeal petition, Falls Church Anglican left the door open to negotiation, but placed the burden on the diocese for presenting what it called “an equitable out-of-court resolution.”The Rev. Dr. John Yates II, rector of the Falls Church Anglican, told his congregation May 8 that in order to appeal the church had to deposit $2.8 million with the court. The money, which includes the disputed amount plus $122,400 of interest for nine months, will be held until the appeal is settled.The state Supreme Court said in a June 2010 decision that Bellows erred in an earlier ruling when he said that the breakaway congregations involved in the cases were entitled under a Civil War-era statute to retain all the parishes’ real and personal property when they left the Episcopal Church and joined another denomination. The Supreme Court held that that statute did not apply. Bellows’ Jan. 10 order resolved the dispute in favor of the diocese and the Episcopal Church on grounds other than the statute.Yates said the $2.8 million bond “has drained the specially designated accounts for all sorts of ministries and means that we are now basically in a week-to-week situation financially,” adding “we have some ministries on hold and have cut back in other areas during this period as we learn just what our expenses will be.”Yates wrote that “over the next six months of transition, we have almost no resources and are dependent upon God to provide for our church.” He urged members to tithe and announced a campaign for them to increase their pledging.The Anglican congregation vacated the Falls Church property on May 13 and is worshiping in a variety of locations. The continuing congregation, which is now known as Falls Church Episcopal returned to the church campus on May 26. The diocese is renting the Falls Church rectory to Yates at “a fair rent” for up to a year so that he can decide where to relocate his home, Burt said.The rectory rental is one of what Burt called “other key side agreements with real and positive consequences for the people affected” between the diocese and the Anglican congregation. They include the return of the Falls Church Day School, which serves more than 200 children, to Falls Church Episcopal oversight and Bishop Shannon Johnston’s decision to give the Rev. Cathy Tibbetts, Falls Church Episcopal priest-in-charge, “authority to respond generously to requests for weddings and funerals in the Falls Church by members of the Falls Church Anglican.”Meanwhile, Burt reported in his letter that “each of the continuing congregations remains profoundly committed to its mission and ministry” and is “experiencing significant growth.” However, the letter notes that in some instances “no continuing congregation exists” and reports that so-called Dayspring teams “are considering a number of transformational mission efforts.”Dayspring is an “integrated effort to discern and implement vision and strategy in response to the return of Episcopal properties to the mission of the Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Virginia,” according to the diocese.“There is need to step back and take careful consideration of the options and possibilities that lie before us” as properties are returned and congregations return home, the diocese said.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Jason Matthew says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Doug Desper says: June 11, 2012 at 1:42 pm Rev. Farrell,Thank you for speaking candidly. It is unfortunate that a number of people chose to leave, unlawfully hold church property, and refuse to recognize the movement of the Spirit in our midst. I don’t believe that the “people are pathetic”, but I do believe that the whole situation is “pathetic”. If a parish decides it wants to leave the TEC that should be their full right, however, you have to do it like any other upstart group…from the ground up! You don’t get to keep the beautiful buildings, the sacred vessels, vestments, bank accounts etc. You have to cut your losses and start out on a new trek, and make your own way. Unfortunately, we cannot ask the founding members of the Church (who we EPISCOPALIAN) if they would still want to be Episcopalian. We can’t ask all those generations who helped build an EPISCOPAL Church if they are upset with the direction of the Church. We just can’t do that…therefore, it would have to be assumed that the Church started out Episcopalian, and it must forever remain so. I applaud TEC for standing up against conservative groups that would bully others into accepting their own vision of the church, version of the “truth”, and interpretation of scripture.It’s unfortunate that things have come to this, but the alternative isn’t acceptable either.There are many a people who wring their hands at how “hopeless” the situation is for the TEC, but I don’t believe it’s as bleak as some would have us to believe. I attend a church that is in the top 3 Episcopal parishes for Sunday attendance. We currently have about 2,500 members, 5 Eucharist Services on Sunday where well over 200 attend EVERY SUNDAY, and Compline Sunday evening. We have morning and evening prayer daily. Membership at our parish is soaring. Yes, we are in a downtown urban setting … that may account for some of it. However, I come from a rural parish and I can honestly say that even with the changes in the Church that rural parish is still trucking on. Most of the membership decline there has been due to death. So, while there may be several thousand who have left the TEC … it’s not as bleak as others would have us to believe.We will move forward … we will progress. Some will be with us, and others will be against us, but the Gospel will still move forward in the love and acceptance of Jesus Christ. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cody Blair says: June 26, 2012 at 12:38 pm Cody,Not to detract from your argument, but Falls Church was actually founded as an Anglican church :-/In other highlights, I agree the Anglican congregation has no right to keep the property etc. Its just sad TEC hasn’t been more accommodating locally and nationally in an attempt to compromise and make a place for all in the church. Conservative and Progressive. After all, no matter what side of the cross we lie (Left or Right), there is always room in the middle. We’ll have to get along in Heaven, might as well “test try” it down on Earth. Doug Desper says: The Rev. John T. Farrell says: Comments are closed. Doug Desper says: Alan Musick says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ken Beck says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI June 21, 2012 at 8:55 pm Thanks for the link for the summary. I had expected details often found in the minutes of proceedings not just that (basically) “it passed – really it did”. Makes the pedigree a bit strained. Submit a Press Release June 24, 2012 at 2:38 am If it were not for the Episcopal Church I would not attend any at all. I would study the Bible at home and just merely be “spiritual.” That is where the whole church world is heading if it does not get away from far right wing inspired spiritual abuse. So instead of saying it is the “gay agenda” seeking to bring down the church. Consider first your own attitudes and seek to follow the teachings of Jesus Christ.The Episcopal Church could be more like there brothers and sisters in the Catholic Church and sweep instances of sexual abuse under the rug. The Episcopal Church could be anxiously paying people off to be quiet about sexual misconduct. Thankfully, that is not happening here. Instead it is taking a stand for love and justice just as Jesus Christ (Love your neighbor as yourself. Judge not, lest ye also be judged.) would do if he were in flesh and on Earth. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 June 28, 2012 at 7:04 pm Amen. These people just don’t and won’t get it. While it is a shame for believers to have to go to court, what other remedy is there for outright piracy? Go quietly and humbly, ye dissidents. Please cease and desist from your looting and intransigence. The property belongs to the diocese and the national church, not to the self-appointed bunch of bandits who think they know it all better. It is indeed “pathetic” in the original sense of Greek pathos. Look it up if you don’t believe me. Fr John Crean says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET June 7, 2012 at 9:10 pm Mark,Was it not TEC that sued the congregation instead of trying to come up with an amicable settlement? Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Colby Register says: Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ center_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group June 7, 2012 at 10:32 am This troubles me… It is very sad that the Church of Jesus has to resort to the courts. May the Spirit guide all those involved. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Property Mark Thomas says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Comments (13) Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Mike Winns says: June 7, 2012 at 5:53 pm Add sore losers to the appellations of thieves and traitors. These people are pathetic. June 20, 2012 at 9:33 am Mr. Desper:The legislative information you seek may be available at the Episcopal Church Archives, http://www.episcopalarchives.org/digital_archives.html Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN June 15, 2012 at 12:44 pm A congregation that does not want to remain in the Episcopal Church has a right to leave. But it cannot take the property. That said, these cases should be settled in one of the following 3 ways. 1. Walk away. 2. Rent the property at market value. 3. Buy the property at market value. Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska June 8, 2012 at 10:07 am Rev. Farrell,To say that “these people are pathetic” continues the dismissive attitude that accompanied the quickening downward spiral in our Church since 2003. The concerns of these and other thousands of members was dismissed cavalierly as “the few who don’t want to be with us”. Now that we are losing dioceses, number below 2 million, can’t attract half of that to show up, are shuttering cathedrals and seminaries, one would hope that dismissing the valid critiques and concerns of the membership would not continue to be the order of the day. It’s their money. Let ’em try. If they don’t win it doesn’t affect TEC or your church in particular. If they do win, maybe it is the wake-up call that this self-crippling Church needs to get back on track. The Pension officials get it. General Convention leaders are waking up to it: We are dying out fast, and can’t sustain ourselves, and I would add that it is mainly because Christian America isn’t buying what we are offering and what we have committed to for a generation: indiscriminate theological faith and practice – something that has absolutely not worked in any church, or diocese where it has been dominantly taught or practiced. David Justin Lynch, Esquire says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Events June 16, 2012 at 10:13 am I have a simple request. Will ENS please publish the minutes of the action from the General Convention which passed the property legislation known as the Dennis Canon? There is a lot of discussion about this canon but many claim that it is practically untraceable in legislation and that its passage was questionable. Let’s start there, if we can. Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing June 21, 2012 at 11:53 am I guess some Episcopal clergy are only accepting and welcoming if you are in 100% lockstep with the leadership. I cannot believe that a “Rev.” in any Church would refer to fellow brothers in Christ as “pathetic.” Incredible….and sad… This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jun 6, 2012 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VAlast_img read more

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General Convention July 3 Sermon

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL General Convention July 3 Sermon Bonnie Anderson, president, House of Deputies Tags General Convention, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] The following sermon was preached July 3, prior to the beginning of the 77th General Convention of the Episcopal Church, meeting in Indianapolis Ind., July 5 through July 12.Bonnie Anderson, president of the House of DeputiesSermon for Commissioning of Officers, Dispatch Liaisons and Legislative AidesIn the Name of the Creator, Sanctifier and Redeemer. Amen.If ever there was a time when to say, “Ladies and Gentlemen, Start your engines” this is it. Here we are in the land of the Indy 500. Even though our General Convention really is not located on the Indianapolis Motor Speedway those of us in this room, plus many others who will be along shortly, could metaphorically be referred to as the drivers, the pit crew, the sponsors, the bearers of the checkered flags, and the infield population of some really fast, sometimes deafening, exciting, unpredictable and possibly dangerous event.Thank God that to Indianapolis and to this holy endeavor we call General Convention, we bring the gifts that God has so generously given us, and we are equipped with the hopes and dreams, the resources and the prayers and faithfulness of those who have entrusted this General Convention to us. We can wear these gifts as a crash helmet or we can strew them about like rose petals in the closing parade.Either way, we all have a few things in common, not the least of which is that we all said “yes” to this enterprise. So first and most importantly, thank you for saying “yes” with enthusiasm, perhaps even with a bit of trepidation. Thank you for the labor of love that you have agreed to, not only the labor of love we will exhibit here, but for your faithful commitment to God’s church, and to the Christian community gathered here. So, here we are gearing up to serve God’s Church. The holy people of God, gearing up, supported by a theological conviction that was first articulated by William White in 1782:You know that mantra, don’t you? The conviction is this: God speaks through all levels of the Church and we cannot be confident of God’s direction until all levels are heard from.As the chaplain to the 76th General Convention House of Deputies, Frank Wade said, “The Episcopal Church gives its ultimate authority not to a ruling prince or an ecclesiastical nobility, not to its scholars or to political victors but to a gathering of laity, deacons, priests and bishops who-to the consternation and confusion of most of the rest of the Anglican Communion – must agree before our decisions are final.”That’s us. The cognate legislative committees represented here are a microcosm of what Frank was talking about. By the time legislation comes to your committees it will have gone through a process of review first by a proposer, who with two other persons if it is a B or D resolution, or by an entire diocesan convention or a whole province if it is a C resolution, by a committee, commission, agency or board composed of clergy and laity and bishops, if it is an A resolution. Then it comes to a cognate committee composed of bishops, clergy and laity. Then there is an open hearing on the resolution so more people can have their say, and then it goes to the floor of the House of Deputies or the House of Bishops, where it is vetted even further. By the time a resolution is voted upon, it has been through a process that even the most diligent critics of large group decision making process would call deliberative consensus. In Anaheim we considered nearly 419 resolutions in that manner, giving clarity and complexity and calling upon all of us to move toward the future together.By the way, there is some invisible writing inside the first page of your Blue Book. If you haven’t brought lemon juice to splash on it for readability, I can tell you what it says:  YOU ARE GIFTED AND GOD IS HIRING.Here’s the deal:Forget that this labor of love called General Convention is all scrunched together in 8 days and that these tasks of reorganizing the Church, considering the covenant, hearing the results of what the 76th General Convention charged the Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music to bring us, confirming consecrations, and way more – forget that all this is not possible in the time required. As Paul Hawken says, “Don’t be put off by people who know what is not possible. Do what needs to be done, and check to see if it was impossible only after you are finished.”We are in the realm of the Holy Spirit. Do we know exactly what will happen here? I don’t think so. We will probably disagree on some things and agree on others. Our minds and hearts might even be changed. We will pray and we will worship, we will laugh, some of us may even cry. We will be plunked down into that wacky Christian community full of people that Henri Nouwen says we would never in all our life, choose for ourselves.Do we have a window into the bigger future? Of course we do. We know that whether we live or die, we will be okay. We know that we have made promises to God in the company of each other that we will keep forever, because we are the baptized. We know that God gives us everything we need in order to do God’s work. We know that the power of God is alive within ordinary people just like us and that the obstacles before us are no match for God’s power that lives in us.The Church beckons us to be on God’s side. God beckons us to be on the Church’s side. That means letting go of one-sided thinking, letting go of contest or conflict thinking. No more rumors about House of Bishops and the House of Deputies, they don’t like each other, that we don’t really need each other. Because the truth is, we really do need each other, desperately. Perhaps we just need to remember who we already are. The children of God, together.I close with a story told by John Morehouse.Upon the arrival of her baby brother, a little girl insisted that she spend some time alone with her brother. Her parents agreed but listened in on the baby monitor as the girl closed the door and walked over to her new brother’s crib. After a minute of silence she asked quite firmly: “Tell me about God, I have almost forgotten.”“It’s simple,” they say, says Mary Oliver in her [poem] When I Am Among the Trees:It’s simple, “and you too have come 
into the world to do this, to go easy, to be filled 
with light, and to shine.”We are blessed to be on this journey together.Amen. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Featured Jobs & Calls Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Posted Jul 3, 2012 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ General Convention 2012 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Servicelast_img read more

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Celebran en Nebraska la vida y ministerio de un legendario…

first_imgCelebran en Nebraska la vida y ministerio de un legendario sacerdote nipoamericano Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Rev. Hiram Kano preside el culto en una iglesia de Nebraska.[Episcopal News Service] En los cuatro años que estuvo prisionero en los campos de internamiento durante la segunda guerra mundial, el Rdo. Hiram Hisanori Kano presidió el culto y ministró y enseñó a los que se encontraban alrededor de él,  incluidos sus carceleros, otros internos y alemanes prisioneros de guerra.La vida y el ministerio del sacerdote de Nebraska son materia de leyenda, y tanto que la legislatura del estado aprobó una resolución en que reconoce sus contribuciones, y el gobernador Dave Heineman ha designado el 29 de julio como “Día del Padre Hiram Hisanori Kano”.La Obispa Primada, Katharine Jefferts Schori, oficiará en un festival eucarístico en honor de Kano a las 4:00 P.M. del 29 de julio en la iglesia de Nuestro Salvador [Our Savior] en North Platte, Nebraska.“La vida y el ministerio del P. Kano ofrecen un notable testimonio del poder transformador del amor a nuestros enemigos”, dijo la Obispa Primada.Recientemente, la 77ª. Convención General de la Iglesia Episcopal en Indianápolis aprobó las medidas preliminares para incluir a Kano en Santas y Santos, el calendario de conmemoraciones de la Iglesia.Cyrus Kano, de 91 años, ingeniero mecánico jubilado, dijo que su padre convirtió la adversidad en un terreno fértil para la misión.“Él dijo, bueno, Dios me puso aquí, ¿qué quiere él que haga?” recordaba Kano durante una reciente entrevista telefónica desde su casa en Cape Cod, Massachusetts. “Él vio en uno de los campamentos que sus compañeros de prisión eran muchos de los líderes de la comunidad japonesa —muchos profesores, médicos, abogados, dentistas y otros profesionales— y organizó una universidad en el campamento, que incluía a los guardianes, para asistir a estas clases cuando les conviniera”, apuntó Kano.“Mi padre también hizo estudios de la naturaleza y llevaba a grupos de personas a las ciénagas de Luisiana y les daba explicaciones acerca de las hojas, los cipreses y los animales —las [serpientes] mocasines acuáticas, los caimanes”, añadió.Adeline Kano, de 84 años, convino con esta opinión, añadiendo que aunque a su padre “lo internaron, él siempre fue un hombre muy ocupado, que trató de seguir haciendo su labor como sacerdote, como ser humano, que trataba de ayudar a otras personas.“Todos estos hombres estaban encarcelados y, usted sabe, les resultaba difícil concentrarse en mantenerse tranquilos y serenos y positivos. Luego, algunas de las cosas que mi padre hizo mientras estaba en esos campos fue… enseñarles a los prisioneros acerca de la naturaleza. Eso podía ayudarles a mantener sus mentes distraídas del hecho de que estaban encarcelados y lejos de sus familias”.Kano también dirigió servicios de culto mientras estuvo preso. “Incluso [los miembros de] la Fuerza Aérea hablaban con él. Había algunos prisioneros alemanes allí. Él siempre trataba de darle esperanzas a todo el mundo, porque en eso consiste nuestra creencia”.Kano emigró a Estados Unidos luego de que un encuentro, siendo joven, con William Jennings Bryan, en su natal Japón, acució su sentido de aventura, según cuenta su hija Adeline.“Mi abuelo era el gobernador de la prefectura de Kagoshina”, explicó Kano durante una entrevista telefónica reciente desde su casa en Fort Collins, Colorado.“Cuando Papá vino a Estados Unidos en 1916 fue para casa de Bryan”, agregó ella.Inicialmente, Kano hizo una maestría en economía agrícola en la Universidad de Nebraska y no tardó en convertirse en activista y líder entre los japoneses “issei”, o la comunidad de la primera generación, muchos de los cuales habían venido a trabajar en granjas o en los ferrocarriles.El Rvdmo. George Allen Beecher, entonces el obispo de la diócesis misionera de Nebraska Occidental, oyó hablar del activismo de Kano en 1921, cuando algunos legisladores estatales estaban considerando una ley que impidiera a inmigrantes japoneses poseer o heredar tierras, o incluso arrendarlas por más de dos años. Ni se les permitiría que poseyeran acciones en las compañías que ellos mismos hubieran creado.El Rdo. Hiram KanoKano y Beecher se conocieron y viajaron juntos al capitolio estatal para hablarles a los legisladores, que finalmente aprobaron una medida menos restrictiva, según las memorias de Kano Un granjero de Nikkei en las llanuras de Nebraska [Nikkei Farmer on the Nebraska Plains].Varios años después, Beecher convenció a Kano de que se convirtiera en un misionero para la comunidad japonesa [en Nebraska], que entonces se calculaba en unas 600 personas. En 1925, Kano aceptó y la familia se mudó a North Platte. Lo ordenaron diácono tres años más tarde y empezó a servir en dos congregaciones misioneras, la iglesia de Santa María [St. Mary’s] en Mitchell y la de San Jorge [St. George’s] en North Platte. Fue ordenado al presbiterado en 1936.Rose Yamamoto, que tradujo las memorias de Kano del japonés al inglés, dijo: “Si el padre Kano no hubiera estado con nosotros ahora no seríamos episcopales. Él condujo a la comunidad cristiana en Mitchell y North Platte.Roy S. Yanagida era sólo un muchacho, pero recuerda a Kano como “[un factor] determinante en brindar un liderazgo, y particularmente educación. Él le brindó ese liderazgo a mis padres, junto con muchos otros que recibieron la ciudadanía de Estados Unidos”.Al igual que muchísimos otros inmigrantes, su padre, Toshiro Yanagida, llegó a North Platte a trabajar en el ferrocarril, y más tarde  se convirtió en aparcero. “North era en gran medida la ciudad para los inmigrantes japoneses”, recuerda él.Las iglesias que Kano pastoreaba eran “un punto de reunión para muchos de nosotros”, dice Yanagida. “También teníamos una escuela japonesa en la iglesia, donde estudiábamos japonés”.Él también recuerda la conmoción y la tristeza que inundó a la comunidad después del ataque del 7 de diciembre a Pearl Harbor. Agentes del FBI arrestaron al P. Kano ese mismo día. Él pasó los próximos cuatro años en varios campos de concentración.“Se lo llevaron inmediatamente porque él era el líder del grupo”, recuerda Yanagida. “El resto de nosotros no tuvimos que ir a un campo de internamiento porque nos dijeron que estábamos bastante tierra adentro —que si hubiéramos estado en la costa occidental habríamos tenido que ir”.Atareado es la manera en que Adeline Kano recuerda a su padre. Él estaba siempre trabajando, ya fuera ayudando a otros, estudiando o preparando sermones.Aun así, ella no se dio cuenta del tremendo impacto de su ministerio en la comunidad, dijo. “Yo sólo sabía que él estaba ocupado, y que iba y venía, dondequiera que viviéramos, ya fuera en el brazo[Panhandle] de Nebraska o en North Platte”.Con frecuencia, era un ministerio de equipo, agregó. “En ese tiempo no teníamos niñeras… Íbamos todos a visitar a las familias. Nos subíamos al auto e íbamos”.Gran parte de eso se llevó a cabo con el apoyo y la ayuda de su madre, Aiko Ivy Kano, añadió ella, que se siente muy honrada por la próxima celebración, a la cual se propone asistir, así como también lo hará su hermano.“Sé que él hizo mucho, pero yo no me di cuenta de la magnitud de su obra”, afirmó. Respecto a la posibilidad de que incluyan a su padre en el calendario de la Iglesia, dijo: “Es asombroso. Una experiencia anonadante”.El Rdo. Winfred Vergara, misionero asioamericano de la Iglesia Episcopal, se mostró de acuerdo. “El otorgamiento de este honor vindicaría al P. Kano y a los miles de nipoamericanos que fueron indebidamente recogidos y llevados a los campos de internamiento durante la segunda guerra mundial.“El ministerio pastoral de Kano entre sus compatriotas japoneses internados y su cuidado pastoral que se extendió a soldados caucásicos que estaban presos por ausentistas y desertores, le ganó el sobrenombre de “el santo de Nebraska” y lo hizo un agente fiable del ministerio de la reconciliación”, dijo Vergara.Habrá también una celebración de las dos misiones que Kano dirigió, Santa María en Mitchell y San Jorge en North Platte. Con el tiempo ambas se desdoblaron en otras congregaciones, como la iglesia de Nuestro Salvador, dijo Steve Kay, un feligrés que organizó las celebraciones.“Él fue un hombre increíble”, dijo Kay refiriéndose a Kano en una reciente entrevista telefónica. Dedicó su vida ayudar a los inmigrantes, a enseñarles. Fue [también] un asesor agrícola.Después de jubilado, Hiram y Aiko se mudaron a Fort Collins, Colorado, donde Adeline Kano vive aún. Él murió en 1988, cerca de su 100º. cumpleaños. Aiko falleció en 1997, dos meses antes de cumplir los 100.— La Rda. Pat McCaughan e corresponsal del Servicio de Prensa Episcopal. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Por Pat McCaughanPosted Jul 30, 2012 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NCcenter_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL last_img read more

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New Zealand: Churches holding up well in quakes

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Anglican Communion Featured Events Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Zealand: Churches holding up well in quakes Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs center_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing Rector Martinsville, VA [Anglican Taonga] Church buildings in Wellington and Nelson show no significant damage from the earthquakes that are continuing across the centre of the country.However, parishes are being asked to ensure buildings are safe and to check them again if there are further earthquakes.The Archbishop of the New Zealand dioceses, the Most Rev’d Philip Richardson, says people are builders of community and this is a time when the church across the province can respond by supporting the communities of Marlborough and Wellington in prayer.“With the ongoing earthquakes there can be feelings of uncertainty and tired nerves, so the message is one of love, support and prayer, as communities face possible further earthquakes in their day-to-day living.”The Bishop of Wellington, the Rt Rev’d Justin Duckworth, says clergy are being urged to take on two responsibilities: people and property.“I am asking those who are pastors to ensure that families and staff are taken care of as well as those in the community who may welcome a friendly face at this time,” says Bishop Justin.The Bishop of Christchurch, the Rt Rev Victoria Matthews, has also sent a message of support from a city that has lived with major earthquakes for over two years.She has asked for prayer across the country in support of those experiencing the quakes.“Earthquakes destroy the illusion we are in control of our environment,” she says. “The earthquakes make us realize that life is more fragile than we want to admit as more than physical objects get smashed.“But in the midst of it all it is possible to reach out and create community, so look for those who are frightened and vulnerable so people know they are neither forgotten nor alone.“Also remember the emergency response teams and caregivers as their jobs became much more difficult and they need support and encouragement.”A 6.5 magnitude earthquake on Sunday occurred as Choral Evensong began in Wellington’s Cathedral of St Paul. The service was stopped and the Cathedral emptied immediately. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis By Jayson RhodesPosted Jul 22, 2013 Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA last_img read more

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Update: Group of Episcopalians safe in Nairobi after airport fire

first_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET By ENS staffPosted Aug 7, 2013 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 center_img Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Update: Group of Episcopalians safe in Nairobi after airport fire Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Members of the public stand in front of the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport, as it goes up in flames, in Kenya’s capital Nairobi, Aug. 7. A fire engulfed Kenya’s main airport, choking a vital travel and trade gateway to east Africa, witnesses and officials said. The cause of the fire was not yet known. Photo: ReutersEditors note: Story updated 12:15 p.m. EDT Aug. 9 with travelers’ location, other details[Episcopal News Service] Six Episcopalians who had been in Kenya since late July and were stuck in that country Aug. 7 after their flight to the U.S. was disrupted by a massive fire at the Nairobi airport report that they have taken a bus and a plane to Ethiopia.Rebecca Wilson posted on her Facebook page about 6:15 a.m. EDT on Aug. 9 a summary of the route she, her son Jacob Bilich, Jim Naughton, the Rev. Lowell Grisham, the Rev. Jon M. Richardson and Ellie Rolfes Rencher took out of Kenya.“We took an eight hour bus ride from Nairobi to Kilimanjaro, including two hours waiting to get across the Tanzanian border, and then spent six hours overnight in the Kilimanjaro open-air airport with mosquitoes and not enough food or water,” Wilson wrote. “Then, at 4:30 am, we flew from Kilimanjaro to Mombasa to Addis Ababa. Then we stood in a crowd for two hours and — advocated, shall we say? — for boarding passes for tonight’s flight to Dulles [International Airport in Washington, D.C.] and voucher for a hotel day room and meals.”“Believe it or not, our story is better than some we heard from folks who stayed in Nairobi to wait it out,” she added. “Here’s hoping we land in DC Saturday morning with no more stories to tell!”On Aug. 7, Wilson reported on Facebook that the group was “safe and sound in a lovely Nairobi guest house” after learning of the fire on their way to the airport.“We are working on rebooking flights now and are keeping our phones open and charged for calls concerning that process,” she wrote at the time.Prayers were said for the group Aug. 7 during the noon day Eucharist at the Episcopal Church Center in New York.The six were part of a larger group of 16 Episcopalians who met July 29-Aug. 1 at the Jumuia Conference Centre in Limuru, Kenya, with Anglicans from nine African countries and ecumenical participants to explore issues of sexuality in dialogue with scripture. The Chicago Consultation and the Ujamaa Centre of the University of Kwa-Zulu Natal in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, convened the conference with the Consultation.The meeting continued conversations and relationships begun two years earlier at a similar consultation in Durban, South Africa, according to the Consultation.Wilson told the New York Times that the group had spent a few days after the gathering in a village near the Masai Mara Game Reserve. They learned of the fire on their way to the airport, she said.Wilson and her son live in Akron, Ohio; Naughton lives in Washington, D.C., They are partners in Canticle Communications. Rolfes Rencher, whose home is in Charlotte, North Carolina, is an associate of the firm.Grisham is the rector of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Richardson is the rector of the Memorial Church of the Good Shepherd in Philadelphia.Kenya authorities temporarily closed Jomo Kenyatta International Airport after the fire, which took firefighters four hours to extinguish. Later in the day, some domestic and cargo flights were allowed to operate, the New York Times reported. The airport is said to be East Africa’s busiest.No one was killed in the blaze, the Times said.Media reports noted that Aug. 7 was the anniversary of the 1998 coordinated bombings of American Embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, attacks that killed more than 200 people. However, Reuters quoted, Boniface Mwaniki, head of the Nairobi anti-terror police unit, as saying there was no connection with terrorism. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, ORlast_img read more

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