Kung Fu Will Play The Music of Steely Dan On Upcoming Tour

first_imgFunk fusion rockers Kung Fu have announced a national Spring tour, The Fez Tour. Each show will feature a set of original music and a set of Steely Dan. Needless to say, fans of either band will be pleased with the exceptional musicianship that will take place.With opportunity to explore their original music before diving into the cult phenomenon’s classic compositions, Kung Fu is set up for an exciting 28-date tour throughout the nation.The Fez Tour will run across 20 states spanning through the Northeast, Mid Atlantic, Southeast, Midwest and Colorado. Kicking off at the Ardmore Music Hall, the band will hit Toad’s Place, Higher Ground, Boulder Theater, Brooklyn Bowl, and more, with festival stops at Wanee and Phunkberry. Check out the full schedule below:last_img read more

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The Motet Releases Red-Hot New Album, ‘Death Or Devotion’ [Listen]

first_imgTo mark today’s release, The Motet also shared a hilarious promo clip that not-so-subtly borrows from the infamous Fyre Festival trailer. The parody video even names The Motet as “Pablo Escobar’s Favorite Band” as the album’s funky title track plays in the background. You can watch the Fyre-inspired Death or Devotion promo video below.The Motet has a busy 2019 winter tour ahead of them as they begin to bring Death or Devotion to the stage. You can see a list of upcoming winter tour dates below, or head over to the band’s website for more information.The Motet 2019 Winter Tour1/31/2019 – Bozeman, MT | Rialto Theater2/1/2019 – Jackson, WY | Pink Garter2/2/2019 – Salt Lake City, UT | Commonwealth2/7/2019 – Boston, MA | House of Blues (w/ Galactic)2/8/2019 – Philadelphia, PA | The Fillmore (w/ Galactic)2/9/2019 – Brooklyn, NY | Brooklyn Steel (w/ Galatic)2/15/2019 – Seattle, WA | Showbox (w/ John Medeski’s Mad Skillet)2/16/2019 – Portland, OR | Roseland Ballroom (w/ John Medeski’s Mad Skillet)2/17/2019 – Bend, OR | Midtown Ballroom (w/ John Medeski’s Mad Skillet)2/22/2019 – Berkeley, CA | UC Theater (w/ John Medeski’s Mad Skillet)3/1/2019 – Crystal Bay, NV | Crystal Bay Club3/2/2019 – Crystal Bay, NV | Crystal Bay Club3/7/2019 – Charlotte, NC | Neighborhood Theater3/8/2019 – Richmond, VA | The National3/9/2019 – Washington, DC | 9:30 Club3/15/2019 – Atlanta, GA | Variety Playhouse3/16/2019 – Nashville, TN | Exit/InView Tour Dates Today, following months of anticipation, The Motet has officially released their latest studio album, Death or Devotion. The new record marks the band’s first release since 2016’s Totem. Last night, the Denver, CO seven-piece—comprised of Dave Watts (drums), Joey Porter (keys), Garrett Sayers (bass), Ryan Jalbert (guitar), Lyle Divinsky (vocals), Drew Sayers (sax) and Parris Fleming (trumpet)—previewed Death or Devotion for their hometown fans with a free surprise album release show at Cervantes‘. Now, they’ve unleashed the 10-track LP for funk fans in the Mile High City and beyond to get down to.Since The Motet’s inception in 1998, the funk collective has released eight full-length albums and toured the country relentlessly, playing hundreds and hundreds of shows from coast-to-coast. Death Or Devotion, however, marks the first Motet studio effort in which newer members Lyle Divinsky, Drew Sayers, and Parris Fleming were all involved with all aspects of the upcoming record, from writing to recording and, finally, mastering and preparing for release.The Motet also made a conscious effort to examine a broad swath of themes with the new material. As Divinsky tells Live For Live Music, “Death or Devotion is a unique exploration of the human experience and what it means to be alive in the present day, with themes of love and love lost, political and community introspection, and, of course, an all-out party. On this record, we want to push the envelope of what you’d expect from a typical funk band.”You can listen to the new album from The Motet in full below.The Motet – Death or Devotion – Full Albumlast_img read more

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A pill to shed fat?

first_imgHarvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) researchers have taken what they describe as “the first step toward a pill that can replace the treadmill” for the control of obesity, though that shift, of course, would not provide all of the many benefits of exercise.HSCI principal faculty member Chad Cowan and his team members at Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), a Harvard affiliate, say they have created a system using human stem cells to screen for compounds that have the potential to turn white, or “bad,” fat cells into brown, or “good,” fat cells, and have already identified two compounds that can accomplish that in human cells.The path from these findings to a safe and effective medication may not be easy, and the findings will have to be replicated by other research groups, as well as refined, before they could lead to a clinical treatment.However, Cowan said that the two compounds discovered so far “target the same molecule, and that molecule plays a role in the inflammatory response. So if you administered them for a long time, the person taking them could become immune-compromised,” which argues against the use of these initial compounds without modifications. One, however, is already on the market, as a treatment approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for rheumatoid arthritis.White fat cells store energy as lipids and play a role in the development of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and related conditions, including heart disease, while brown fat has been shown in mice to lower triglyceride levels, reduce the insulin resistance associated with type 2 diabetes, and burn white fat.When the body takes in excess energy, it is stored as lipids in white fat cells. When there are too many calories coming in and not enough burned, adult stem cells in the body produce more white fat cells, adding to a person’s burden of fat.Cowan’s group has found two small molecules that convert fat stem cells, which normally would produce white fat, into brown-like fat cells. These brown-like fat cells burn excess energy and thereby reduce the size and numbers of white fat cells.The report by Cowan, an associate professor in Harvard’s Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, and colleagues was released online earlier today by the journal Nature Cell Biology. Annie Moisan, a postdoctoral fellow in Cowan’s lab, is the lead author of the study.Cowan said that what “we were really impressed by is that there are some compounds that have this same kind of effect when they are administered to animals, but when you remove them, the effect goes away. But what we saw here was a stable conversion” of white fat cells to brown cells.“You’re constantly replenishing your fat tissue,” Cowan explained, “so if you were on a medication to convert the cells, each new fat cell would be more metabolically active and would convert to brown fat over time,” reducing the likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes or any of the other conditions related to a buildup of fat.A former postdoctoral fellow in HSCI co-director Doug Melton’s Harvard lab, Cowan began working with fat cells more than seven years ago, when he established his own lab, which originally was in the MGH Center for Regenerative Medicine. “I wanted to use stem cell-derived fat for this purpose and to understand aspects of type 2 diabetes and obesity, which my lab still does,” Cowan said.But the path to this point has been a long one. Cowan said that while there were reports in the literature of research groups producing fat cells from stem cells, “we couldn’t get any of those protocols to work. So we had to spend the first three or four years perfecting the protocols to produce white and brown fat cells.”The current findings resulted from a sponsored research collaboration with drug giant Roche Pharmaceuticals, Cowan said, but “unfortunately, the collaboration with Roche has ended because the company decided, for unrelated reasons, to end its metabolic disease program.”“We found these two compounds by screening a library of about 1,000 compounds,” Cowan said, “so we know that if we have access to the typical pharmaceutical company library of 1.5 to 2 million compounds, we will find others.” Cowan is currently in discussion with several pharmaceutical companies about continuing the work. Additionally, a collaborator in Germany has been testing the first two compounds on mice. “We expect to have results fairly soon,” Cowan said, adding that, “The compounds appear to work the same way in mice, but we don’t know what the long-term metabolic or immune system effects are“This is the kind of thing we expected the formation of HSCI” a decade ago to lead to, Cowan said. “The good news/bad news is that science is slow. Just establishing proof of concept takes an enormous amount of time. We thought that working with stem cells would lead to the discovery of new drugs and therapies, and now it’s really starting to happen. A decade of hard basic scientific work is paying off.”last_img read more

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Physicians must play a greater role in social justice

first_imgPhysicians need to step up their role in safeguarding human and civil rights because failure to do so can threaten the health and even the lives of individuals facing political persecution, social strife, racial discrimination, or other forms of exploitation, according to Nikhil “Sunny” Patel, MPH ’16, who along with other Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health students, contributed to the AMA Journal of Ethics issue published in October 2015 titled “Physicians, Human Rights, and Civil Liberties.”“Social justice is not merely a nice idea but a crucial part of our responsibility to promote health,” wrote Patel, an MD/MPH student at Harvard Chan School and a fourth-year medical student at the Mayo Medical School in Rochester, Mich. Patel served as theme issue editor and co-authored several articles, including an article about the failure of the American Psychological Association to prohibit members’ involvement in torture. He also moderated a podcast with Harvard Chan School alum Joia Mukherjee, MPH ’01.Other Harvard Chan School students who contributed to the journal issue included Dominic Caruso, Andrea Christopher, Mohit Nair, and Amos Lichtman. Judith Palfrey, professor in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences and J. Wesley Boyd of Harvard Medical School and Cambridge Health Alliance also assisted. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Tony Awards to Honor Rosie O’Donnell

first_img O’Donnell, who has hosted the Tony Awards three times, is being recognized for her commitment to arts education for New York City’s public school children. In 2003, Rosie’s For All Kids Foundation launched Rosie’s Broadway Kids, which is now known as Rosie’s Theater Kids (RTKids). Rosie’s Theater Kids provides training in dance, music and drama for students attending public school in New York City, serving students who otherwise would not have the opportunity to experience theater. The Tony Awards will honor stage and screen star Rosie O’Donnell with the Isabelle Stevenson Award at the 2014 ceremony on June 8. View Comments Past recipients of the Isabelle Stevenson Award include Larry Kramer, David Hyde Pierce, Eve Ensler and Bernadette Peters. O’Donnell’s theater credits include Grease, Seussical, Fiddler on the Roof, Love, Loss and What I Wore and the Encores! production of No, No, Nanette. In 2004, Rosie combined her love of Broadway with 80s pop musical sensation Boy George and produced the musical Taboo. She hosted and executive produced the Emmy-winning The Rosie O’Donnell Show for six years. Her other screen credits include A League of Their Own, Sleepless in Seattle, Another Stakeout, The Flintstones, Exit To Eden, Now and Then, Beautiful Girls, Harriet the Spy, Wide Awake, Tarzan. Riding the Bus with My Sister, Will and Grace and America.last_img read more

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Tix Now On Sale to See Return of Ruthless! The Musical

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 10, 2016 Related Shows Ruthless! The Musical View Comments Some kids will do anything to be a star…Ruthless! The Musical is returning off-Broadway. Tickets are now available to see the production, which is directed by Joel Paley. Performances will begin on June 25, with opening night set for July 13 at St. Luke’s Theatre.The cast includes Peter Land (My Fair Lady), Kim Maresca (Twelfth Night), Rita McKenzie (Ethel Merman’s Broadway), Zoie Ann Morris (Ragtime), Tracy Jai Edwards (Hairspray) and introducing Tori Murray.Co-created by Paley and Marvin Laird, the newly imagined revival is set in a world that includes Toddlers and Tiaras and Honey Boo Boo. Tina Denmark is a pretty, charming and diabolical eight-year-old girl who “was born to entertain.” With the encouragement of slick and overbearing potential agent Sylvia St. Croix, Tina will do anything to play the lead in her school play, and we mean anything. The question is, where does such remarkable talent and unstoppable ambition come from?Ruthless! first appeared off-Broadway 22 years ago at the Players Theatre. The original production featured a few young girls in the role of Tina who you might have heard of, including Britney Spears, Natalie Portman and Laura Bell Bundy.last_img read more

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Vermont Law School uses $1.5 million grant to open enviro firm in China

first_imgAiming to use lawsuits to fight pollution and protect workers, Vermont Law School’s US-China Partnership for Environmental Law has received a $1.5 million federal grant to establish China’s first public interest environmental law firm and expand a university-based legal clinic.China’s rapid industrialization and urbanization have caused severe environmental degradation, including greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to global warming worldwide and hundreds of thousands of deaths a year in China due to exposure to pollution. The crisis has prompted China’s leaders to seek new ways to allow steady growth, while protecting the air, land, water and public health. That’s where VLS’s U.S.-China Partnership comes in, providing training, expertise and aid intended to help China enforce environmental laws and regulations that have been widely ignored.The $1.5 million grant from the U.S. State Department’s Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor (DRL) will expand the use of civil lawsuits as an enforcement method. Chinese prosecutors currently focus on criminal prosecutions in environmental cases, in part, because they lack a formal civil judicial enforcement role. The DRL grant is the latest in a series of federal grants that have made Vermont Law School the leading U.S. law school working on environmental law, policy and energy issues in China. The new grant includes $500,000 annually over three years.“This is a groundbreaking environmental advocacy initiative in China,” said Assistant Professor Siu Tip Lam, director of the U.S.-China Partnership.“Our work over the past four years has put us in a unique position to further advance environmental governance in China,” Dean Jeff Shields said. “This DRL support will enable us to build on those successes.”The public interest law firm, which will be the first in China devoted solely to combating pollution, will handle citizen-action lawsuits intended to enforce environmental laws and regulations. The grassroots litigation is designed give citizens more power to protect themselves, their families and their communities from the worst polluters. The firm is tentatively slated to open in December with about six attorneys in Beijing. It also will provide training for government officials, lawyers and citizens on pollution issues and legal means to address them.Additionally, the grant will fund expansion of an environmental legal clinic at Sun Yat-sen University Law School (SYSU). The clinic thus far has focused on research and policy and regulation development, but starting this fall the clinic will collaborate with a current labor law clinic at SYSU to promote workplace safety and teach students how to practice law and bring workplace injury lawsuits involving environmental health and safety issues.Since 2006, the U.S.-China Partnership has trained more than 1,000 Chinese lawyers, judges, government officials, faculty, students, business owners and others, conducted numerous workshops and undertaken other initiatives. Much of the work has been done through grants from the U.S. Agency for International Development. VLS’s partners include SYSU, the Center for Legal Assistance to Pollution Victims at the China University of Political Science and Law, the Vermont-based Regulatory Assistance Project, the China Environment Forum at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and China’s National Development and Reform Commission Training Center.##Vermont Law School, a private, independent institution, is the nation’s top-ranked environmental law school and has one of the top-ranked clinical training programs in the nation, according to U.S. News & World Report. VLS offers a Juris Doctor (JD) curriculum that emphasizes public service, a Master of Environmental Law and Policy (MELP) degree for lawyers and nonlawyers, and two post-JD degrees, the Master of Laws (LLM)  in Environmental Law and the LLM in American Legal Studies (for international students). The school also features innovative experiential programs and is home to the Environmental Law Center and the South Royalton Legal Clinic. For more information, visit www.vermontlaw.edu(link is external).Source: VLS. 6.15.2010last_img read more

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Garnar: Broome County moves onto phase two

first_imgFor a map detailing where cases are located in the county, click here. In total, 546 cases of the virus have been reported since the beginning of the pandemic. The county executive announced the 43rd death due to the coronavirus in the county. Garnar also says he was thankful to state leadership for hearing his message that Broome County businesses cannot wait another day to re-open. (WBNG) — Broome County Executive Jason Garnar says the county is ready for phase two of reopening on Friday Broome County May 29 coronavirus updatecenter_img Garnar’s announcement comes after some confusion Thursday night about phase two businesses returning to work. Garnar said that the county has a clearer path after phase two has been confirmed. Garnar also says regarding data, the county has seen improvements in several categories. He says the focus of the county is to shift onto measures that need to been taken for phase three businesses to get back on track. Coronavirus numbers The individual was a woman in her 80s and a Willow Point Nursing Home resident. last_img read more

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Chris Harrison Grills Clare Crawley, Dale Moss

first_imgThe Bachelor alum echoed that in an exclusive interview with Us Weekly before her season premiered. Although she spoke to Blake Moynes after he reached out to check in on her before the show began, he was the only one, she told Us.“There was never a moment where I was going to reach out or I wanted to reach out [to the contestants] because I knew that this was going to happen eventually where I was going to get the chance to meet these guys,” the California native said last month. “I didn’t want to kind of prejudge anybody and shoot myself in the foot by having these conversations and putting that at risk. ‘Cause it’s like, you only really know when you meet them in person and it can actually be around their pheromones to see them in person to know, do we have that connection?”Chris Harrison Grills Clare Crawley Dale Moss About Whether They Spoke Before BacheloretteClare Crawley and Dale Moss. ABCShe continued: “So if I was to start something up with a guy beforehand, it would just be doing myself a disservice … I’d be putting it all on the line for that? I mean, that makes no sense to me.”- Advertisement – The promo also hints at Tayshia Adams, the new Bachelorette, meeting the men for the first time — and some of them admitting to her that they had developed real feelings for Crawley. The phlebotomist, 29, also shares that she “never” wants to feel like a “second choice” again and is worried some of the suitors see her that way.At the end of the clip, the host reveals to Adams that “unfortunately, everything is about to change.”The Bachelorette airs on ABC Tuesdays at 8 p.m. ET.Listen to Here For the Right Reasons to get inside scoop about the Bachelor franchise and exclusive interviews from contestants “There’s skepticism out there,” he says in the preview to Crawley, 39, and Moss, 32, before asking, “Did you lie to all of Bachelor Nation?”Chris Harrison Grills Clare Crawley Dale Moss About Whether They Spoke Before BacheloretteChris Harrison. ABCHarrison also asked Crawley whether she spoke to Moss before the show during Thursday’s episode.“Can I ask you a very honest question? Don’t f–k with me. Did you guys talk at all before the show?” he asked the hairstylist. Without hesitation, she answered. “Not one bit, not one word. I swear on my dad’s grave, not one single word, not one single contact, 100 percent. And that’s why I’m so into this. I’ve just spent years knowing what I don’t want, and it’s given me so much clarity coming into this — especially in quarantine — to focus in on what I do want. I feel like Dale is my match.”- Advertisement – Telling the truth? Clare Crawley has repeatedly denied talking to Dale Moss before season 16 of The Bachelorette began. However, does Chris Harrison believe her?After the couple got engaged during the Thursday, November 5, episode, a promo revealed that the host, 49, sits down with them on a new episode airing Tuesday, November 10.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Citigroup launches real estate shake-up

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