Ashes 2019: Steve Smith first player ever to be ruled out of a Test due to delayed concussion

first_img scorecard commentary view more view less graphs No data available!center_img advertisement Ashes 2019: Steve Smith first player ever to be ruled out of a Test due to delayed concussionSteve Smith had suffered a blow to the back of his neck while batting against Jofra Archer on Day 4 of the ongoing 2nd Test between England and Australia at Lord’s. India Today Web Desk LondonAugust 18, 2019UPDATED: August 18, 2019 18:48 IST Steve Smith was examined on the ground by Australia team doctor Richard Shaw (AP Photo)HIGHLIGHTSSteve Smith was on 80 when he was hit on the neck by a Jofra Archer bouncer on Day 4Smith returned to the crease about 40 minutes later and was eventually dismissed for 92Marnus Labuschagne has been confirmed as Smith’s concussion replacementAustralia batsman Steve Smith has been ruled out of the remainder of the second Test due to a “delayed concussion” after the blow that he suffered on the back of his neck while batting on Day 4 of the ongoing match against England at Lord’s.Marnus Labuschagne has been confirmed as Smith’s concussion replacement. This is the first time a concussion replacement will be used by a team in Test cricket after this new rule was approved in July this year by the International Cricket Council (ICC). Smith is also the first player ever to be ruled out of a Test match due to a delayed concussion.On Saturday, a nasty bouncer from Jofra Archer, bowled at close to 90mph, hit Smith on the back of his neck just below the helmet, causing him to fall flat on the pitch. He was taken off the field after the Australian team doctor Richard Shaw examined his condition on the field.Steve Smith has been ruled out of the remainder of the second Ashes Test.Marnus Labuschagne has been confirmed as his concussion replacement.#Ashes pic.twitter.com/ienFwUpInKICC (@ICC) August 18, 2019″Steve has been closely monitored by medical staff overnight and this morning reported that after sleeping well, he woke with “a bit of a headache and a feeling of grogginess.” Steve reported that his left arm which was also struck during his innings yesterday was “much better”.”As part of the Cricket Australia concussion protocol, repeat concussion testing of Steve Smith was also performed this morning and demonstrated some deterioration from his testing which is consistent with the emergence of the symptoms he was reporting.advertisement”On that basis Steve has been withdrawn from the match by team doctor Richard Saw and the Australia team will lodge an application for a concussion substitute with the ICC match referee in line with the ICC protocol,” Cricket Australia said in a statement on Sunday.Smith was on 80 when he was hit and was given a standing ovation by the crowd at the home of cricket as he walked off the ground before returning to the crease about 40 minutes later following the dismissal of Peter Siddle.Smith was eventually dismissed for 92 by Chris Woakes as Australia scored 250 in reply to England’s first innings total of 258.Smith underwent further concussion tests on the morning of the final day at Lords and has reportedly been ruled out. He is now a serious doubt for the third test at Headingley, which gets underway on Thursday.The five-day concussion protocol could rule him out, although it is unclear how the rule will be interpreted.The Aussies though, ended the day’s play in a commanding position after having reduced the hosts to 96 for 4 in 32.2 overs with Ben Stokes (16*) and Jos Buttler (10*) as the overnight batsmen.Pat Cummins and Peter Siddle made early inroads with two wickets each before Stokes and Buttler made sure no more wickets were lost.Also Read | People who booed Steve Smith at Lord’s not cricket fans: Mitchell JohnsonAlso Read | Ashes 2nd Test: Jofra Archer’s hostile spell reminds Ricky Ponting of 2005 seriesAlso Read | Ashes, 2nd Test: Steve Smith clears concussion protocol after Jofra Archer blitzAlso Read | Fans slam Jofra Archer for smiling after nasty bouncer to Steve SmithFor sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byrohan sen Tags :Follow Steve SmithFollow Ashes 2019Follow England VS Australialast_img read more

Read More »

More than 300 fines issued as gardaí crack down on broken lights

first_imgAlthough there were 317 prosecutions detected, many people took our advice and rectified their defect or the inappropriate use of fog lights or fog lamps beforehand. We would like to express our thanks to the public for their support of operation Light Up.  Initiatives such as these ultimately help make our vehicles and roads safer for all.RSA chief Noel Brett added that the number of drivers being prosecuted was “disappointing”.“It is important to realise that it is a very serious road safety issue. For example a car driving in the dark with a broken headlight could easily be mistaken for a motorcyclist. The consequences of this happening are unthinkable.“That’s why I would urge drivers, to set aside a couple of minutes before a journey to perform a quick check of their vehicle lights. A couple of minutes that will give you peace of mind knowing you are not facing a fine, prosecution or worse, being responsible for a crash further down the road.”During January, 184 people were caught for driving dangerously while 641 drivers were found to be driving while intoxicated.Read: Woman dies after being struck by a van in Mayo GARDAÍ ISSUED 317 fines to motorists driving in vehicles with defective lights over two days last month.Operation Light Up was held on 20 and 21 Feburary to tackle the growing problem of broken and missing front and back lights.The Garda Press Office said it appreciated some motorists are under financial constraints but emphasised the legal requirement that a vehicle’s lights and lamps are all in working order.More than 1,300 cars were stopped because of issues with lights. The majority (1,089) were just given advice by the garda but 317 were issued with fixed charge notices.The most common problem was having no working right front lamp with 114 offences recorded. Counties in the south of the country noted the highest incidence of problems with 508 cars stopped and 128 fines issued.Some offences were detected during daylight hours and it was deemed appropriate that it be dealt with by way of advice to motorists, according to gardaí.So far this year, 40 people have lost their lives on Irish roads. This is a fact that cannot be ignored, said Assistant Commissioner Gerard Phillips.“We appeal to the public to get the basics right. Slow down, wear your seatbelts always and make yourself as visible as possible when walking or cycling.”He said the operation last month was about raising awareness rather than doling out fines.last_img read more

Read More »

Frustrations over slow recovery as Japan marks anniversary of tsunami

first_imgJAPAN IS MARKING the second anniversary of the devastating earthquake and tsunami that killed nearly 19,000 people and displaced more than 300,000, amid growing dissatisfaction with the slow pace of recovery.Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said that the government intends to make “visible” reconstruction progress and accelerate resettlement of those left homeless by streamlining legal and administrative procedures many blame for the delays.“I pray that the peaceful lives of those affected can resume as soon as possible,” Emperor Akihito said at a sombre memorial service at Tokyo’s National Theatre.At observances in Tokyo and in still barren towns along the northeastern coast, those gathered bowed their heads in a moment of silence marking the moment – at 2:46pm (5:46am Irish time) on March 11, 2011, when the magnitude 9.0 earthquake struck off the coast.Japan has struggled to rebuild communities and to clean up radiation from the Fukushima I nuclear plant, whose reactors melted down after its cooling systems were disabled by the tsunami.The government has yet to devise a new energy strategy — a central issue for its struggling economy with all but two of the country’s nuclear reactors offline.About half of those displaced are evacuees from areas near the nuclear plant. Hundreds of them today filed a lawsuit demanding compensation from the government and the now-defunct plant’s operator, Tokyo Electric Power Co., or TEPCO, for their suffering and losses.“Two years after the disasters, neither the government nor TEPCO has clearly acknowledged their responsibility, nor have they provided sufficient support to cover the damages,” said Izutaro Managi, a lawyer representing the plaintiffs.Throughout the disaster zone, the tens of thousands of survivors living in temporary housing are impatient to get resettled, a process that could take up to a decade, officials say.“What I really want is to once again have a ‘my home’,” said Migaku Suzuki, a 69-year-old farm worker in Rikuzentakata, who lost the house he had just finished building in the disaster. Suzuki also lost a son in the tsunami, which obliterated much of the city.160,000 evacuees don’t know if they can ever returnFurther south, in Fukushima prefecture, some 160,000 evacuees are uncertain if they will ever be able to return to homes around the nuclear power plant, where the meltdowns in three reactors spewed radiation into the surrounding soil and water.The lawsuit filed by a group of 800 people in Fukushima demands an apology payment of 50,000 yen (€400) a month for each victim until all radiation from the accident is wiped out, a process that could take decades. Another 900 plan similar cases in Tokyo and elsewhere. Managi said he and fellow lawyers hope to get 10,000 to join the lawsuits.Evacuees are anxious to return home but worried about the potential, still uncertain risks from exposure to the radiation from the disaster, the worst since Chernobyl in 1986.Police officers search for bodies of the 2011 tsunami victims on the coastline in Ishinomaki in Japan’s Miyagi Prefecture earlier today, on the 2nd anniversary of the disaster. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)While there have been no clear cases of cancer linked to radiation from the plant, the upheaval in people’s lives, uncertainty about the future and long-term health concerns, especially for children, have taken an immense psychological toll on thousands of residents.“I don’t trust the government on anything related to health anymore,” said Masaaki Watanabe, 42, who fled the nearby town of Minami-Soma and doesn’t plan to return.Yuko Endo, village chief in Kawauchi, said many residents might not go back if they are kept waiting too long. Restrictions on access are gradually being lifted as workers remove debris and wipe down roofs by hand.“If I were told to wait for two more years, I might explode,” said Endo, who is determined to revive his town of mostly empty houses and overgrown fields.New government may invigorate rebuilding effortsA change of government late last year has raised hopes that authorities might move more quickly with the cleanup and reconstruction.Since taking office in late December, Abe has made a point of frequently visiting the disaster zone, promising faster action and plans to raise the long-term reconstruction budget to 25 trillion yen (€200 billion) from 19 trillion yen (about €152 billion).“We cannot turn away from the harsh reality of the affected areas. The Great East Japan Earthquake still is an ongoing event,” Abe said at the memorial gathering in Tokyo. “Many of those hit by the disaster are still facing uncertainty over their futures.”The struggles to rebuild and to cope with the nuclear disaster are only the most immediate issues Japan is grappling with as it searches for new drivers for growth as its export manufacturing lags, its society ages and its huge national debt grows ever bigger.Those broader issues are also hindering the reconstruction. Towns want to rebuild, but they face the stark reality of dwindling, aging populations that are shrinking further as residents give up on ever finding new jobs.The tsunami and nuclear crisis devastated local fish processing and tourism industries, accelerating a decline that began decades before.Meanwhile, the costly decommissioning of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant could take 40 years as its operator works on finding and removing melted nuclear fuel from inside, disposing the spent fuel rods and treating the many tons of contaminated wastewater used to cool the reactors.Following the Fukushima disaster, Japan’s 50 still viable nuclear reactors were shut down for regular inspections and then for special tests to check their disaster preparedness. Two were restarted last summer to help meet power shortages, but most Japanese remain opposed to restarting more plants.The government, though, looks likely to back away from a decision to phase out nuclear power by the 2030s. Abe says it may take a decade to decide on what Japan’s energy mix should be.Gallery: Japan’s tsunami repairs, six months onRead: Japanese tsunami: 7 incredible survival storieslast_img read more

Read More »