Hugo Delhommelle makes immediate impact in first season with SU

first_imgThe first thing junior midfielder Jonathan Hagman highlighted about Hugo Delhommelle was his red beard that has hung low from his chin for four years now.Syracuse’s new anchor on set pieces grew it out after losing a bet with his friends back in his home country of France over FIFA, an EA Sports video game. The loss required Delhommelle to grow the beard out for six months. After he paid his dues, the beard stayed. It’s become a staple on Syracuse’s midfield line.“It started to be like my personality,” Delhommelle said.In his first season since transferring from Lander University, where he tallied 35 points in two seasons, Delhommelle has become No. 21 Syracuse’s (5-3-2, 0-2-1 Atlantic Coast) go-to option on set pieces, where he’s totaled five points in the last five games. While possessing the ball, he utilizes his creativity to evade defenders and push transition from the middle third. That earned him 2016 NCSAA All-American honors.On Friday, when Syracuse travels to Pittsburgh (3-5, 0-3), Delhommelle will continue to be a centerpiece for the Orange, which looks for its first ACC win of the season.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textDelhommelle’s nine points ranks second among SU players, trailing the team leader, Hagman, by one. But it’s often what the junior does in the middle third of the field that jumpstarts the offense.“His set pieces have been exceptional, his dead ball service, but also he’s lively. He’s got athleticism, he’s got personality,” Syracuse head coach Ian McIntyre said. “He makes us different. He’s very unpredictable in the final third which, from a defensive perspective, it’s tough to matchup with him.”Josh Shub-Seltzer | Staff PhotographerHis creativity with the ball is displayed often. On Sept. 3 against Northwestern, it came in the form of a backheel. He gathered the ball using a touch with the back of his foot to skirt past two charging Wildcats defenders and advance the ball forward. Against Princeton two days prior, he used his feet to distract the opposing defenders in a different way. In two quick movements he exchanged his right foot then his left in front of the ball before bursting past two tangled Tiger defenders.“It’s the reason I play,” Delhommelle said, “to enjoy the way I play.”He credits his nifty plays to watching stars like Ronaldinho growing up. Employing his idols tactics is simple: see it, practice it ad-nauseam, then bring it to games. Thus far, the creativity has led to opportunities for SU, leading to set pieces.From the set piece, he bends the ball. In a game against Oregon State on Sept. 12, Delhommelle sent a long ball from the right side of the field about 10 yards into the attacking side. It curved toward the far left post where his teammates failed to finish the opportunity. Later that game, Delhommelle served Syracuse’s first corner kick goal of the season. From the right corner, the ball traveled near post where John-Austin Ricks stood waiting. Ricks flung the ball to nylon with his head for the eventual game-winning goal with just two minutes remaining in the match.“(He is) a really technical guy, good on the ball, his services on set pieces have been terrific,” Hagman said. “Ricks has scored twice now because the ball has been perfect from the corner from (Delhommelle).”Early in the season, Syracuse goalkeeper Hendrik Hilpert commended Delhommelle’s free kick ability. He said the way Delhommelle shoots makes it difficult to tell where the ball is headed. Trying to stop his kicks in practice helps Hilpert get better reads on balls he’d otherwise miss.Now, 10 games into the season, Delhommelle has put Syracuse on the board before its opponent twice. The first came against then-No.11 Virginia, when Delhommelle called off his teammate, junior defender Kamal Miller, to take a penalty kick. The ball tucked inside the right post to give Syracuse a 1-0 lead in an eventual 2-2 tie.“The only thing I have to work on is not just showing up for the crowd,” Delhommelle said. “Dribbling helpful for the team, be more decisive score more goals and get more assists too.”Josh Shub-Seltzer | Staff PhotographerMonday night, in a 2-0 victory at Colgate, Delhommelle scored the game-deciding point in the 9th minute. He approached the free kick slowly, with short choppy steps.Earlier this year, the shot was often blocked. Against Princeton it dropped to the bottom left before being saved by a diving goalkeeper. Against Louisville he went short side to the right post. Louisville’s goalkeeper wasn’t fooled and shoved the chance away with two hands.On Monday, he finished. The ball curved into the top corner of the net and Delhommelle casually walked away. Over 20 minutes later, he bent a corner into the box for Johannes Pieles, who guided the ball in, completing SU’s 2-0 victory over Colgate.“I think there is more there too,” McIntyre said. “We are just scratching the surface with him.” Comments Published on September 27, 2017 at 7:39 pm Contact Josh: jlschafe@syr.edu | @Schafer_44 Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Women’s hoops falls to UCSB by 11 points

first_imgHowever, the Trojans struggled to run offense and keep possession of the ball all night, finishing with 19 turnovers, one lower than their season high mark of 20, and 9 more than UCSB’s total.  Trakh commended his team for its continuous effort despite being so shorthanded. Freshman guard Endyia Rogers posted 10 points and six rebounds with just one turnover against UCSB. ( Yannick Peterhans | Daily Trojan) The shorthanded Trojans were undefeated before the road contest in Santa Barbara, posting a 3-0 mark following a trio of comfortable wins to open up the 2019-20 campaign.  The USC women’s basketball team suffered its first loss of the season Monday, falling to UC Santa Barbara 57-46.  Trakh also added that a recent slew of injuries have forced the young Trojans into a “baptism by fire,” as they’ve been forced to adjust to the speed and intensity of the collegiate game on the fly.  Trakh attributed USC’s free throw woes to inexperience.  The Gauchos made USC pay for its turnover woes, winning the points off turnover battle by a mark of 22-5, a gap of 17 points in a game that was decided by 11. “I don’t fault the young kids at all — there’s going to be a learning curve, and they’re a talented group that’s working hard,” Trakh said. “We’ve just got to keep moving in the right direction and being very patient with them.” Injuries and mistakes killed the Trojans, who were without standout graduate transfer guard Stephanie Watts and senior forward Kayla Overbeck due to injuries. They remain without freshman guard Madison Campbell and redshirt sophomore guard Shalexxus Aaron, who have yet to make an appearance this season due to their own respective ailments.  The Trojans’ late push fell short, however, as the Gauchos pulled away in the late stages to bring the lead to double digits. The Gauchos were 1-2 heading into the matchup, coming off a tight loss to San Jose State. A strong stretch from the Trojans gave them the lead following a 5-0 personal run from Rogers, but the Gauchos answered back with an 11-0 run to jump out to a lead they did not relinquish.  “I think how we bounce back and what kind of heart and desire we play with will give me a barometer on this team,” Trakh said. “The future is bright — we just have to be patient.”  “I think that’s youth and understanding; you’ve gotta be ready to play and understanding that teams are going to come after you,” Trakh said. “I think that’s a learning experience.” The previously mentioned comeback effort nearly came to fruition as freshman guard Alyson Miura sank a clutch 3-pointer to bring USC within 2 points with four and a half minutes to play.  USC women’s basketball is back in action against star junior guard Chennedy Carter and No. 6-ranked Texas A&M Saturday at Galen Center at 5:30 p.m. Santa Barbara was also led by junior point guard Danae Miller, who filled the stat sheet with six rebounds and four assists to go along with 12 points.  The offensive struggles would continue for the Trojans, as a dismal 20-point second half ensured UCSB never had to look back. The Gauchos won the game comfortably despite a late push from head coach Mark Trakh’s unit.  Stout defense from UCSB limited the Trojans to 3 points for the final five minutes of the first half, and the Gauchos carried a 34-26 advantage into halftime.  Saturday will certainly be an early test for Trakh’s young squad, and the Trojans will be eager to make a statement against a premier opponent following their first loss of the season. The Gauchos were also spurred by a dominant performance from freshman forward/center Ila Lane, who had a double-double with 21 points and 12 rebounds, including five offensive rebounds. The win moves UCSB to an overall mark of 2-2 on the year. As for his expectations for Saturday’s big matchup, Trakh said he’s looking forward to seeing how his team responds to the UCSB defeat and competes against some of the top talent in the country.  The freshman duo of forward Alissa Pili and guard Endyia Rogers shouldered the offensive load. The two built upon strong starts to their Trojan careers; each posted 10 points, and they combined for 11 rebounds.  The Trojans shot just 25% from the free throw line, on 2-of-8 shooting. In the Trojans’ first three games, which were all wins, they shot over 90% from the charity stripe in two games and 78% in the other. While not the only issue in USC’s first loss, this would be troubling for the Trojans should the trend continue. last_img read more

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