Another political stunt

first_imgDear Editor,The People’s National Congress (PNC)-led coalition pulled off another political stunt rather than a celebratory event – this 52nd Independence anniversary of our country. I say this in review of the pathetic show foisted on the people at D’Urban Park. They rented schoolchildren (typical PNC style propaganda machinery) from all across the country to populate the stands to hear the most depressing of speeches in a long time. Well, if you should take the President’s speech in its truest sense, the children were not the ones catered for in that address; his talk was mainly for the adults and those at home. So, Granger’s address was simply “talk” that was over their heads.Right from the very start of the ceremony, that is, the salute and inspection of the guard, showed that empty void of pomp and pageantry, that usually greets you at these events. Even when he was invited to inspect the guard of honour, Granger was literally running ahead of the ceremonial officer. The common formalities that important dignitaries show on such important events were woefully lacking. He looked lost, confused and bewildered. The President’s show of nervousness may have been symptomatic of his address that came after in which he gave himself away in all that he said. His was a prepared speech full of political innuendos and he contradicted himself throughout the address. Whether by accident or design, he completely forgot his campaign promises, chief of which was the ushering in of the “good life” soon after taking office. That promise we now know was a farce, seeing the good life is not an achievable good for the present generation, but something in the far distant future. Yes, we heard him, loud and clear a “future good life” and not a present one.Of course, this is the newest “pie in the sky” campaign type rhetoric coming from a President three-fifths into his rule.So, the supposed additional bacchanal of this Independence anniversary being a “Carnival” event that too was a damper as the people saw this as another ploy to divert attention from the present sad situation that has enveloped this nation. That Burnhamite strategy resurrected by Granger, is a sure way of keeping the nation in a stupor. Dance away your worries, dance your stresses and your distresses away. But even that was low-key because there is nothing to party about because most of us lack the means with-which to party. Where is the means to do so? With over 25,000 persons out of a job and others not sure of the one that they now hold, the situation is terribly dreadful.To sum it up in these simple words, it was an “abysmal performance by the Granger regime.”Respectfully,Neil Adamslast_img read more

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Prime real estate

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week Their bellies were full, and the crops were ready to go to market. Fifty years ago, most of what is now Industry was covered by walnut groves, rows of corn and other crops. These days, almost all of the farms are gone, pushed out by the warehouses and factories that dominate this thin swath of a city. All, that is, except for a strawberry field on Azusa Avenue and the Jaime family farm on a 6-acre plot of land on Proctor Avenue and Ninth Street. Tucked among factories and auto-repair garages, the Jaimes cultivate rows of arugula, mustard greens, chard, tomatoes, okra and other vegetables. The whirring hum of industrial engines at a nearby plumbing parts factory droned through the morning air until the sound was broken by the sizzle of mashed-bean batter dropping onto a wide skillet. A small woman, Sotero Jaime,… stood under a patio and flipped the mash cakes with a spatula. Her husband, Jose Luis Jaime, …smiled from beneath his green baseball cap and began counting crates of lettuce and bell peppers. About six men loaded the vegetables on to two small trucks, then crowded around the skillet as Sotero tossed the hot cakes into polystyrene bowls. They gingerly pulled the hot cakes apart until they were gone. “We are just about the last ones left,” said Leoncio Jaime, …who runs the farm with his father, Jose Luis, his mother, Sotero, and two brothers, Edgar and Jose Luis Jr. There is not much profit in farming, but the family survives by growing new varieties of crops, such as red okra or tomatoes that ripen a few months past the usual harvest time. Since taking over operation of the farm from a another family in 1997, the Jaimes have expanded to land in Yucca Valley, Santa Maria and Chino. And they cultivate new crops, such as long, skinny watermelons or chard that grows in different colors. They sell their produce at 13 farmer’s markets all over Southern California, including several in the San Gabriel Valley and one in Whittier. They also make deliveries to the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District. The Jaimes got into the farming business in 1981, when Jose Luis Sr. came to the United States from Morelos, Mexico, and got a job with the Taguchi family, who used to run the Industry farm. When the Taguchis decided they were through with farming, Jose Luis Sr. who knew little about growing vegetables when he came to this country but had worked his way up to farm foreman took over the cultivation of the land. Leoncio, working as a heavy-machinery mechanic at the time, left his job to help his father. So did his two brothers. “I knew that if I kept working as a mechanic I would have a little money, but there would always be a limit,” he said. “But with this, there was possibility.” The fact that there is still undeveloped land in Industry is a story in itself, according to Mayor Dave Perez. Land values are at an all-time high and the farm could sell for millions. The land of the Industry farm is owned by Planning Commissioner Chuck Maschio, who did a little farming of his own as a young man on 10 acres he owned on Sunset Boulevard. Maschio is now in his 80s and he and his wife live in a house connected to the farm. They inherited the plot from Maschio’s father-in-law, Lawrence Rivera, who also was a farmer. Maschio cannot bear to see the last traces of the area’s rural past disappear, so he leases it out for just enough to cover the property tax, he said. “I get a call almost every day from a developer,” Maschio said. “My wife and I, our things are paid off, so we just want to leave it how it is.” Maschio loves watching his eight great-grandchildren come to his house and go tearing through the field to eat strawberries. “And when I want some lettuce, I just walk outside and break off a piece,” he said. “Especially romaine lettuce. I love that romaine.” Ben Baeder can be reached at (626) 962-8811, Ext. 2703, or by e-mail at ben.baeder@sgvn.com.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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