Munoz, Elliott land Longdale wins

first_imgAngel Munoz was the Saturday IMCA Sunoco Stock Car feature winner at Longdale Speedway. (Photo by Gary Pigg, IMAGEZx2)LONGDALE, Okla. (May 20) – Angel Munoz outlasted seventh-starting Jason Rogers to capture the IMCA Sunoco Stock Car main event Saturday at Longdale Speedway.Kyle Pfeifer placed third, Travis Baird fourth and Hesston Shaw fifth.Robert Elliott garnered the IMCA SportMod feature win while Joe Adams advanced from eighth starting to second.Mike Roach raced from ninth to third. Jeffrey Kaup scored a fourth-place finish and Kaleb Roach was fifth.Both IMCA features were 35-lappers.last_img read more

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Key defensive breakdowns spell Rose Bowl heartbreak

first_imgOregon quarterback Darron Thomas (5) was one of several Ducks that enjoyed a big game against the Wisconsin defense, despite giving up a fumble that resulted in a Badger touchdown. Thomas completed 17 of 23 passes for 268 yards and three touchdowns.[/media-credit]PASADENA, Calif. – It was the storyline from the beginning. The 98th Rose Bowl was expected to be a shootout.All season long, the No. 5 Oregon Ducks (12-2, 8-1 Pac-12) were a fast-paced offensive machine, while the No. 12 Wisconsin Badgers (11-3, 6-2 Big Ten) were methodical giants. Neither defense was expected to slow down the other offense, and the team with the ball in the end was likely going to be the winner.With a few key plays on both sides of the ball, it was Oregon who came out the victor, 45-38 – sending Wisconsin home in heartbreak for the second year in a row.Despite the extra weeks of preparation that were presumed to help UW’s defense figure out how to slow down the blisteringly swift Ducks offense, Oregon worked efficiently, averaging six minutes of possession per quarter and gaining 621 offensive yards.“Obviously a couple of mental breakdowns whether it be key reads, reactions,” head coach Bret Bielema said. “We didn’t even challenge them on two or three of their scores, and nobody can win doing that. We do know they had the speed to outrun us if they got to that point.”And the Ducks certainly did.On several occasions, Oregon was able to break loose and gain major yardage, ending the game with 356 rushing yards, averaging 8.6 yards per carry.The production of Oregon freshman wide receiver De’Anthony Thomas largely embodied Wisconsin’s defensive struggle. On only two carries, Thomas ran for the third-most yards in the game with 155 yards – only nine yards shorter than Wisconsin junior running back Montee Ball’s game-high 164 yards.The majority of that production came on a 91-yard touchdown run to end the first quarter. Senior punter Brad Nortman came in for his first punt of the game, launching a 33-yard punt, which Wisconsin downed on the Oregon five yard line. With very comfortable field position, the Badgers let Thomas slip right by to go essentially end-to-end to tie up the game at 14-14 at the end of the first quarter.“There were a lot of plays that we all wish we could get back, but that first play where we came out and No. 6 scores, a lot of players couldn’t get past that play and were holding their heads down,” senior defensive end Louis Nzegwu said. “We all try and get together and tell them to stay stout, but it kind of lingered in some of the players’ heads the rest of the game. I think it just kind of hurt our focus.”Nzegwu, in one of Wisconsin’s rare shining defensive moments of the game, picked up a fumble linebacker Mike Taylor forced on Oregon quarterback Darron Thomas and returned it 33 yards for a touchdown. The score was the senior’s lone touchdown of his career.“I’m glad I could reach the end zone, … especially in the last game of my career,” Nzegwu said. “I’d trade that for a win any day.”As the Ducks’ speed and run game wore down the Badgers, glaring defensive breakdowns plagued the secondary as well.Junior cornerback Marcus Cromartie, capping an up-and-down season, gave one of his weakest performances of the year, going head-to-head with Oregon wide receiver Lavasier Tuinei. The senior led all receivers with 158 yards on eight catches and two touchdowns. Tuinei also brought down a 41-yarder in the fourth quarter that led to the final score of the game, putting Oregon ahead by a touchdown.Senior safety Aaron Henry, in his most subdued state of the entire season, didn’t credit Oregon’s breakneck pace to Wisconsin’s defensive woes but instead cited small mistakes as the difference-maker.“We did some good things defensively, but at the end of the day it ended up hurting us, the things we didn’t capitalize on,” Henry said. “It was so small and minute, you guys probably did catch onto it, but the coaches did and we did, and it ended up hurting us.”Nzegwu echoed those sentiments.“It’s truly a game of inches,” Nzegwu said. “There’s some guys not filling the right gaps that blew us for big plays. They are what we saw on film. We could have taken advantage of them, but some of us just weren’t focused and some of us tried to do too much, and it ended in big plays.”Essentially, the Badgers didn’t feel the Ducks wore them down. It was simply key mistakes that led to big Oregon plays.“Obviously, we didn’t have a certain number of plays that were fit up gap assignment-wise,” Bielema said. “But there was really never an issue of a guy being out-gassed or not in a correct position because of timing.”Largely a result of the shoddy secondary giving one of its worst performances in allowing 276 passing yards, Wisconsin was forced to face its second consecutive Rose Bowl loss.“It hurts a lot more the second time around,” Henry said.last_img read more

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Meet Brian Dahlstrom, the man responsible for stringing Syracuse’s rackets

first_img Comments Published on February 25, 2019 at 11:00 pm Contact Andrew: arcrane@syr.edu | @CraneAndrew Brian Dahlstrom stood next to a Wilson Baiardo tennis stringing machine tucked in the corner of Drumlins Country Club’s bigServe Pro Shop. He lined up a black and red racket in the middle of the machine, about 100 feet from the lobby where fans watched Syracuse’s match against Colorado on Feb. 15. He wove and clamped strings, tightening rackets at the proper tension.“I think people are surprised that it’s every string,” he said.As Dahlstrom strung the racket, he recalled his importance to No. 25 Syracuse’s (8-4, 2-2 Atlantic Coast) program. He’s why SU has intact rackets during its matches. Why the Orange players always have four rackets to carry in their equipment bags. When Syracuse players break a racket, they give it to Dahlstrom and he has it back to them within 24 hours. Before he came to Drumlins, Dahlstrom co-owned a tennis club in Illinois.Now, he’s an hidden asset for Syracuse.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAmy Nakamura | Senior Design EditorJunior transfer Guzal Yusupova doesn’t like to string her rackets. Gabriela Knutson wants to learn, but others claim it’s too hard. “Of course we give it to someone,” sophomore Sofya Golubovskaya said. For SU, it’s Dahlstrom.“It’s one of those things, once again, that if you don’t know what you’re doing, it’s a complicated process,” Dahlstrom said.On top of a cabinet in Dahlstrom’s office, the room next to the pro shop, sit two totes. He recently pulled a clear one down, opened the lid and took out tennis racket string. It’s his bin dedicated to SU tennis and holds everything he needs for its rackets. To the right of his cabinet, a label says “TO BE STRUNG GO ORANGE,” and above another hook, “COMPLETED RACKETS GO ‘CUSE.”Sometimes, the hooks will stay empty for two weeks. Suddenly, there could be eight fixes needed in 10 days. Last Friday, the only one on either hook was freshman Sonya Treshcheva’s finished racket.Strings form a pocket that the ball is then sucked into, Dahlstrom said, and if the racket’s tension range is between 52 and 62 pounds, the lower side gives shots more spring. SU head coach Younes Limam’s racket is strung at a very low tension because he has complete control of his shots. If a player wants more control and less power behind balls, the racket is strung closer to 62.“If I was going to jump up and down in the air and try to touch the ceiling, the floor would not give me any energy at all, because it’s stiff,” Dahlstrom said. “If you put me on a trampoline, you get more bungee. But what happens on trampolines? Sometimes people break arms, it can be reckless.”Corey Henry | Staff PhotographerA similar concept applies to tennis strings. Before Dahlstrom starts stringing a racket, he pre-stretches the string right out of the package. In the Drumlins hallway, 20 feet from a side exit, he pulls it around the door handle while SU fans squeeze between Dahlstrom and the wall.Prior to Drumlins, he co-owned the Quad City Tennis Club in Moline, Illinois, and at one point strung current Women’s Tennis Association’s No. 17 Madison Keys’ childhood rackets. He first found out about the Drumlins position from SU associate head coach Shelley George, who Dahlstrom met at a meeting in Kansas City. He coordinated everything from installing a new metal roof to painting the lines in the parking lot. Now, at Drumlins, it’s just tennis.“He’s our string guy, he’s our guy,” George said.The stringing machine at Drumlins was used at a US Open, Dahlstrom said. The best one there is in pounds or kilograms, Dahlstrom slides the string through the grommets, clamps it in place, wraps it around the tension arm and simply pushes a button. When it’s time for cross-strings, he weaves it in-and-out of the main one, before repeating the same process. When finished, he knots the end.Inside a box in the back corner of Dahlstrom’s office, he collects old wooden rackets. His father worked in the military in World War II, deployed in the Philippines and learned tennis from a player ranked top-20 in the world at the time while in charge of recreation activities, he said. Every time he finds an old racket that reminds him of his roots, he buys it.Anyone can claim that they can string a racket, themselves, in 15 minutes, Dahlstrom said. The bottom line, in Dahlstrom’s mind, is that his process is more about quality.Todd Michalek | Staff PhotographerWhen Dahlstrom brought his broken racket to his coach while at Illinois State University, Dahlstrom was told to do it himself. An hour-and-a-half later, Dahlstrom’s “ridiculously stringed racket,” loose in the middle and along the edges, is what he avoids today. Now, an average racket takes him about 30 minutes.“Having the opportunity to string thousands and thousands of rackets makes it go faster,” Dahlstrom said.Near the end of Syracuse’s match against Harvard on Feb. 17, Dahlstrom made his way onto the courts and moved toward Knutson’s blue bench. The senior had broken one of her Babolat Pure rackets on the previous rally, set it down and reached inside her blue bag to grab another. After Knutson returned to the court, Dahlstrom went and inspected her racket.Will Hicks, SU’s assistant athletics director for athletic performance, shouted: “He’s a stringer. He does special things to them.” After nearly a minute of toying with Knutson’s racket, Dahlstrom, with his hand still gripping it, disappeared into the Drumlins curtains.center_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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