Holmes’s Origin II surprise

first_imgHe is a very different player to Oates who uses his size and leg drive to make metres through pure strength, but even with this advantage Oates (170) averages 15 running metres less than Holmes per game and it these little statistics that fall in favour of the Sharks flyer. Despite this, Holmes thinks Oates’s work in a Queensland jumper has been exceptional and that he is unlucky not to be playing in Game Two. “I thought him and Dane Gagai were very strong in a losing team. They both carried the ball very well. I didn’t think he would get cut,” Holmes said.”Everyone was saying they needed to make changes so they did, in both the forwards and the backs. “Corey has played a few games now and he’s done very well for Queensland. “I’m just going to play like I have been for club and Australia. I’ve done that by running the ball back hard and competing for everything. “If I get my chance to score I’ll definitely do my best to score it.”Holmes’s Origin debut has been a long time coming after being banned from selection for 12 months in 2016. Holmes was part of a large group of players that broke curfew during Queensland’s Emerging Origin camp at the start of that year. After doing his time, Holmes said it ultimately all worked out for the best and that he has learned from his mistakes. “All the boys learnt from that. It has worked out well,” he said.”I don’t know if I would have been ready to play Origin last year. I only had probably 30 NRL games under my belt. “It’s a good thing and I had a good year. I was happy with it.”The year ended with a Cronulla premiership and four of his grand final winning teammates will face off against Holmes when they run out for the Blues at ANZ Stadium. James Maloney, Andrew Fifita, Wade Graham and Jack Bird will all be looking to one-up Holmes, and the 21-year-old said the banter had started already. “I did get a bit of banter there, especially the day after I got the phone call,” he said.”I had to go in for a little screening and all the boys were there. They were very proud of me and very happy for me, but obviously at the same time there was a bit of banter and they can’t wait to verse me out there. “It is a bit weird [knowing I’ll be playing them] but I can’t wait for it.”Video first featured at qrl.com.au The Maroons’ newest debutant will replace Oates on the wing in Game Two, with the 22-year-old Brisbane Bronco axed from the side after playing four-straight games for QueenslandOates was one of Queensland’s best in their 28-4 loss to the New South Wales Blues in Game One, running for 158 metres and scoring a try. It backed up his 2016 Origin form, with Oates running for the second-most run metres (397) in that series, finishing only behind teammate Dane Gagai (403) after three matches. But Maroons coach Kevin Walters has decided Oates should be the one to make way for Holmes who has been in fine form at NRL level. Holmes, who has represented the Australian Kangaroos on five occasions, averages 185 run metres per game, with a lot of this down to his speed and fancy footwork. last_img read more

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Gears of War developer wants to fight the Microsoft PC gaming monopoly

first_imgEarlier this week, Xbox head Phil Spencer outlined Microsoft’s plan to unify its PC gaming, Xbox One, and mobile gaming platforms into one ecosystem with the Universal Windows Platform. The UWP will make it possible for developers to create a game, or any software, and have it be compatible across all Windows 10 devices. The Redmond-based company believes this will make things better for both developers and consumers.One person who vehemently disagrees is Tim Sweeney, co-founder of Epic Games, which created the Microsoft exclusive franchise Gears of War. Sweeney believes that Microsoft is attempting to monopolize and control the PC gaming market.Since UWP is a closed platform, developers will have to be licensed by Microsoft in order to distribute games written using UWP. This also means that Microsoft could control the sale of PC games and apps and only make them available on its Windows Store. This is the biggest concern of Tim Sweeney and other like-minded developers. “[Microsoft is] curtailing users’ freedom to install full-featured PC software, and subverting the rights of developers and publishers to maintain a direct relationship with their customers,” wrote Sweeney in The Guardian. “Microsoft is moving against the entire PC industry — including consumers (and gamers in particular), software developers such as Epic Games, publishers like EA and Activision, and distributors like Valve and Good Old Games.”He also wrote: “Microsoft has launched new PC Windows features exclusively in UWP, and is effectively telling developers you can use these Windows features only if you submit to the control of our locked-down UWP ecosystem. They’re curtailing users’ freedom to install full-featured PC software, and subverting the rights of developers and publishers to maintain a direct relationship with their customers.”Another concern for Sweeney is that Microsoft will include and update features in UWP that will not be supported by previous development platforms. Basically, games studios will have to support and use UWP in order to remain current with the capabilities on Windows 10. In response to this, Microsoft’s Kevin Gallo told The Guardian that “the Universal Windows Platform is a fully open ecosystem, available to every developer, that can be supported by any store.”Sweeney going after Microsoft like this doesn’t exactly look good for the company, considering how he was a developer of one of Microsoft’s biggest franchises. However, Sweeny’s logic is sound and it’s clear that he is looking out for the best interests of both developers and the average consumer.He finished with: “[Microsoft’s] actions speak plainly enough: they are working to turn today’s open PC ecosystem into a closed, Microsoft-controlled distribution and commerce monopoly, over time, in a series of steps of which we’re seeing the very first. Unless Microsoft changes course, all of the independent companies comprising the PC ecosystem have a decision to make: to oppose this, or cede control of their existing customer relationships and commerce to Microsoft’s exclusive control.”Make sure to read his entire article over at The Guardian.last_img read more

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