1 night in Fréthun

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Buyer demand is driving this local market with some homes selling within days of listing

first_imgHome buyers in Seventeen Mile Rocks are out in force.BUYERS looking to secure a home in Brisbane’s southwest need to move fast or risk missing out, according to Jacqui Liddelow, sales agent at Estate & Co.“There’s high demand and not a lot of stock on the market at the moment,” she said.Ms Liddelow said the sale of 72 Brookeside Crescent, Seventeen Mile Rocks for $774,000 on October 30 was a great example — with 15 groups through the home in the first seven days of the campaign and a deal done soon after.“It went under contract in the first week and we did have two offers on the property,” she said.More from newsDigital inspection tool proves a property boon for REA website3 Apr 2020The Camira homestead where kids roamed free28 May 2019The four-bedroom home appealed to family buyers, with the new owners set to put down roots.“It was a younger couple in their mid-20s — both professionals and looking to start a family,” Ms Liddelow said.Ms Liddelow said this particular section of the suburb appealed to buyers looking for lifestyle with easy access to major roadways as well as service and facilities.“It has a unique sense of community that’s really hard to find,” she said.Ms Liddelow said demand for quality property is set to continue and buyers can look forward to steady value gains through to next year.Follow Kieran Clair on Twitter at @kieranclairlast_img read more

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Additional Funding to Bring New Sand to Stockton Beach

first_imgMinister for Local Government Shelley Hancock has announced an additional $175,000 of funding for the City of Newcastle Council to begin work to boost sand volumes on Stockton Beach, located north of the Hunter River in New South Wales, Australia.“The newest round of funding will enable approximately 5,500 tonnes of sand to be placed on the beach to the south of Lexie’s Café in time for the Christmas school holidays,” Mrs Hancock said.“In the past few months alone more than half a million dollars in funding has been provided by the NSW Government to support the local Council manage erosion issues at the beach.”Funding has been made available through the Government’s Coast and Estuaries Grants Program.According to the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment’s latest news, the NSW Government continues to support the Council’s investigations into potential long-term solutions to improve the condition of the beach, including its investigation into offshore sand dredging.last_img read more

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Drug May Slow Early Prostate Cancer: Study

first_imgHealthLifestyle Drug May Slow Early Prostate Cancer: Study by: – January 24, 2012 Sharing is caring! 23 Views   no discussions Share Tweetcenter_img Share TUESDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) — New research suggests that Avodart, a drug used to treat an enlarged prostate gland, may help slow the progression of early stage prostate cancer, reducing the need for aggressive treatment in some men.Prostate cancer can grow and spread slowly, which is why some men are urged to engage in so-called watchful waiting when the cancer is first diagnosed. Avodart (dutasteride) may help such men feel comfortable with surveillance as opposed to radical treatment, the researchers noted.“The concept of active surveillance is gaining traction in most parts of the world,” said study author Dr. Neil E. Fleshner, head of the division of urology at the Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto. Still, some men are uncomfortable with doing nothing in the face of a cancer diagnosis, he said. “By using this drug, we can improve the proportion of men who remain committed to the surveillance.”The findings are published online Jan. 25 in The Lancet.According to the U.S. National Cancer Institute, one out of every six men in the United States will develop prostate cancer in his lifetime. But because many of those cancers are low-grade, most will die of something else.Avodart belongs to a class of drugs called 5-alpha reductase inhibitors. These drugs work by interfering with the effects of certain male hormones on the prostate. In the three-year study, prostate cancer progressed in 38 percent of 144 men with early prostate cancer who were treated with Avodart and 48 percent of the 145 men who received a placebo.Men seem less anxious about the cancer diagnosis when they are doing something more proactive, Fleshner said. “The drug augments active surveillance and avoids most of the side effects associated with surgery and radiation,” he said. Prostate removal surgery and/or radiation can lead to impotence and incontinence, he said.The medication does have side effects, however, including reversible breast enlargement and tenderness and some sexual dysfunction.“We know that we are over-treating prostate cancer,” said Dr. Louis Potters, chairman of radiation medicine at North Shore University Hospital and Long Island Jewish Medical Center in Manhasset, N.Y.“In the U.S., patients have a tendency to hear the word ‘cancer,’ and want to treat it right away,” he said. “In these men with early prostate cancer, we can now say, ‘Let’s put you on this medication, and see what happens over the next couple of months.’”However, some experts have concerns about 5-alpha reductase inhibitors. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently issued a warning that men who take these drugs to treat enlarged prostate glands may be at increased risk for high-grade prostate cancer.Dr. Ryan Terlecki, an assistant professor of urology at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C., said this may dampen enthusiasm for use of the drug to treat cancer.“The overall role that these medications will play for urologists will decrease,” Terlecki said. Doctors will likely begin looking toward noninvasive and/or non-medical treatments such as the use of thermal heat to cope with some of the symptoms of prostate conditions, he added.By By Denise MannYAHOO Health News Sharelast_img read more

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Cayman Islands premier facing three police investigations

first_imgNewsRegional Cayman Islands premier facing three police investigations by: – April 23, 2012 Share Share 8 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring!center_img Tweet Share Cayman Islands Premier McKeeva BushGEORGE TOWN, Cayman Islands — A spokesman for the Royal Cayman Islands Police Service (RCIPS) confirmed on Saturday that Cayman Islands premier McKeeva Bush is now the subject of three separate police investigations.According to police, one of the investigations involves allegations of financial irregularities in relation to a land deal. In addition, a further allegation of financial irregularities has been made, which is entirely separate from the first investigation.“Finally, allegations have been made in relation to the involvement of the premier in the periphery of a recent incident where a quantity of explosives were imported to the Cayman Islands without the necessary permit,” the police spokesperson said.“All three of these investigations are actively ongoing. The governor and the FCO [Foreign and Commonwealth Office] are being kept fully updated,” the spokesperson added, concluding that “It would be inappropriate for the RCIPS to make any further comment in relation to any of the allegations made, or the status of the investigations, at this time.”The first of the three investigations was confirmed by Governor Duncan Taylor in July 2011, when he acknowledged that the investigation in question centred on a letter said to be written by Bush in 2004, when he was then Leader of Government Business.The letter to developer Stan Thomas, written on Windsor Development Corporation letterhead, and apparently faxed from Bush’s ministry in October 2004, asked for a balance of $350,000 to be sent to the corporation’s account as a result of Bush having “ensured that all of the proposed re-zoning issues” had been approved by Cabinet.Windsor Development Corporation is reportedly owned by Bush’s wife, although according to the official register of interests he is a signatory on the corporation’s bank account.At the time, land purchased by Thomas was the subject of a zoning application. It was rezoned in July 2004 by the Legislative Assembly after Cabinet approved a change in the territory’s development map.However, at a press briefing on Friday, attended by Britain’s Minister for the Overseas Territories Henry Bellingham, who was on his first visit to the Cayman Islands, local media workers were taken by surprise by Governor Taylor’s admission of a second such investigation in response to questions about the first enquiry.Neither Bellingham nor Taylor would comment further and the governor said it was up to the police commissioner to take the investigation forward and that at some point it would be up to the director of public prosecutions to take the matter any further than that. He then revealed that there was another hitherto undisclosed investigation in relation to Bush.No details of this second investigation were given but Bellingham said he was confident of the independence of the police and that they were handling the investigations properly. He added that it was important to keep at arm’s length from the investigations but he was being updated on the progress. “I can say that there is a further investigation, a second investigation involving the premier but, as the minister said, it is not appropriate for me to comment on it in any detail,” Taylor stated, adding it was for the police commissioner to comment.Then on Saturday came the police announcement of a third investigation related to explosives that were apparently imported into the Cayman Islands without the necessary permit.Earlier, on Thursday in a broadcast on local radio in response to opposition calls for him to reveal the details of the police investigation against him, Bush stated that he was aware of “none”.On Saturday morning, his press secretary stated that the premier had no comment yet, as he was still trying “to determine what the governor was referring to” when he made the second disclosure at the press briefing on Friday. These revelations in the Cayman Islands come amidst ongoing investigations in another British overseas territory, the Turks and Caicos Islands (TCI), into allegations of widespread government corruption that have resulted in a number of former cabinet ministers being charged with various offences of bribery, fraud and money laundering.Former TCI premier Michael Misick is currently a fugitive from justice following the issue of an arrest warrant and an Interpol ‘Red Notice’. By Caribbean News Now contributorlast_img read more

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O’Brien admits Gleneagles ‘worry’

first_img The Ballydoyle trainer has already pulled the dual 2000 Guineas hero out of three races because of unsuitable ground, the latest being the Juddmonte International, since he won the St James’s Palace Stakes at Royal Ascot in June. O’Brien is now preparing to step Gleneagles up to a mile and quarter if conditions are agreeable. Aidan O’Brien has his fingers firmly crossed the weather will be kind enough to allow Gleneagles to run in the Qipco Irish Champion Stakes at Leopardstown next month. “It’s a bit of a worry that we haven’t been able to run him three times now,” he said. “We’ll look at Leopardstown and hopefully they will get quick ground. We’ll have to wait and see.” O’Brien is looking to the Moyglare Stud Stakes at the Curragh on September 13 for Ballyodyle after her impressive win in the Debutante Stakes on Saturday. “Joseph (son and jockey) was very happy with her, and obviously we’ll look at the Moyglare next. It looks like she will get further than seven furlongs. She is very well bred and a good mover,” he said. The trainer also has high hopes for Gleneagles’ full sister Coolmore, who showed plenty of promise despite being beaten into third place on her debut in a maiden over a mile on the same card. “I was very happy with Coolmore considering she was slowly away,” said O’Brien. “She is a lovely individual and should come on a lot from the run. Her brother (Gleneagles) got beaten first time out.” center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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Bayern Out to Settle Spanish Score in Madrid

first_imgAfter three consecutive semifinal defeats against Spanish clubs in the UEFA Champions League, Bayern Munich head to Atletico Madrid for today’s group match with a point to prove.“We want to show that we can do better than in the last few semifinals. We certainly have a score to settle there,” said Bayern forward Thomas Mueller before the team jetted off to Madrid.After the highs of beating Borussia Dortmund in the 2013 Champions League final came Bayern’s lows of semifinal exits to Real Madrid, Barcelona and then Atletico in each of the last three seasons under Pep Guardiola. Atletico has won 25 of its last 30 home European games making the Estadio Vicente Calderon something of a cauldron.Last season’s semifinal exit at the hands of Diego Simeone’s Atletico was particularly painful for Bayern, who won the return leg 2-1 in Munich after losing 1-0 in Madrid as the Spanish side reached the final on away goals.“In the last three years, we played three times against Spanish teams and always lost there,” said Bayern chairman Karl-Heinz Rummenigge.“We saw how strong Atletico are last season and you can’t get much more of a tougher test.“Now we have the chance to show with Carlo (Ancelotti) that we can get at least a point there – or even three.”After Guardiola failed to steer Bayern to the Champions League final, his successor Ancelotti is the Bavarian giants’ not-so-secret weapon.Two years ago, Ancelotti’s Real Madrid won the 2014 Champions League final with a 4-1 extra-time win over Atletico.“I really like Madrid and I’m looking forward to going back, I had two wonderful years there,” said Ancelotti.Sightseeing will be the last thing on the Italian’s programme, with Ancelotti more concerned about French forward Antoine Griezmann, whose goals knocked Bayern out of Europe last May.“He could play at any big club in Europe,” said Ancelotti.Bayern smashed Russian side Rostov 5-0 in Munich in their opening Group D match, the same night Atletico won 1-0 at PSV Eindhoven.But the German team’s players know they will be in for a much sterner challenge on Wednesday.“It will be a difficult fight in Madrid and we have to at least get a few goals,” said Bayern captain Philipp Lahm.Bayern defender Mats Hummels, who trained on Monday after limping out of Saturday’s 1-0 win at Hamburg with a knee injury, says the Bundesliga leaders have a “pretty tricky task against one of the top favourites to win the Champions League”.RESULTSMonaco 1- 1 LeverkusenLeicester 1-0 FC PortoCopenhagen 4 -0 BruggeD’Zagreb 0 –4 JuventusCSKA 0- 1 TottenhamDortmund 2–2 R’MadridS’Lisbon 2 – 0 L’ WarsawSevilla 1- 0 LyonTODAYNapoli v BenficaLudogorets v PSGFC Rostov v PSVCeltic v Man CityB’ M’gladbach v BarcaBesiktas v D’KyivAtletico v B’MunichArsenal V FC BaselShare this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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2018 World Cup: Tears, Regret for Lopetegui after Sack

first_img‘I’d like to leave this press conference now because it’s like we’re at a funeral, but we’re starting a World Cup tomorrow, which is a fantastic event.” That’s how Spain captain Sergio Ramos attempted to put a full stop on a turbulent week for his national team in the Black Sea city of Sochi.The remark was perfect in its delivery but perhaps suspect in its timing.Timing, as it happens, has been a key issue in the Spain camp all week, so it felt somehow appropriate that Julen Lopetegui, the manager sacked on Wednesday for negotiating with Real Madrid without the Spanish Football Federation’s knowledge, was being presented to the media by his new club just 60 minutes later.By Thursday, everyone had had a night’s sleep since Lopetegui’s dismissal, but there was still regret.The man himself was tearful as he was unveiled at the Bernabeu alongside his wife and three children and, as Ramos and new Spain interim boss Fernando Hierro also faced a packed press room 3,000 miles from Madrid, the feeling persisted that all this could have been avoided.With their opening match against Portugal just over 24 hours away, there were broad smiles as Hierro and Ramos walked in, conspiratorial whispers with the microphone nudged down and again the message was repeated: “It’s time to put it behind us.”Only three weeks ago, Hierro was smiling in a different room, again in front of the cameras as he praised Lopetegui – a manager unbeaten in his 20 matches leading one of the game’s most exciting groups of players, and who had just signed a new contract up to 2020.After the series of extraordinary events that has unfolded within the Spanish camp this week, Hierro is now the new leader of a team that says it is moving on but must be damaged by what is a mess of more than one man’s making.Who you identify as villain in this story might depend on your point of view. But the key element is Real’s announcement on Tuesday that Lopetegui would take charge of the European champions after the World Cup.That in itself would not have been a problem, but it became one when it emerged Luis Rubiales, the president of the Spanish Football Federation, learned the news only five minutes before it was made public.When Rubiales explained his decision to fire Lopetegui on Wednesday, reportedly on three hours’ sleep after talks ran late into the night, he still looked angry, even though his words were restrained. He had flown in from Moscow, where he was attending the Fifa congress, to the team’s base in Krasnodar.In the Russian capital, he had received a phone call from Madrid. The story goes that he asked them to delay, he tried to reach Lopetegui but couldn’t, and then saw the news go live.A shock apapointment so surprising that Spanish sports newspaper Marca told its Twitter followers: “No, we’re not making this up.”The other side of the story is told by Madrid president Florentino Perez, who on Thursday claimed Rubiales had acted “out of pride” and “disrespected Real Madrid”.Having dismissed his national team’s manager on the eve of the World Cup, Rubiales praised Lopetegui’s “impeccable work” but repeated several times: “No-one is beyond the rules.”The 51-year-old was sacked because he had gone behind the back of the Spanish FA. He accepted a job he may have judged impossible to turn down and the manner in which it played out, in Rubiales’ eyes, made it impossible for him to continue.Here in Sochi, sandwiched between snow-capped mountains and the blue Black Sea, fan opinion seems to be split. Some side with Rubiales and his message: “This is the national team, this is not the way things should be done here.”Some cannot forgive Rubiales for a lack of flexibility when pragmatism might have harmed the team less.Lopetegui brought fine performances in qualification. Some argue sacking him weakens the team more than keeping him on, despite what might be considered incorrect behaviour. But none of the fans I have spoken to believe Madrid and their president Perez acted correctly.I met Manolo, the iconic Spanish football supporter who has been banging his drum at every World Cup since 1982. “The whole thing is so regrettable,” he said. “It’s clear to see who is at fault – Real Madrid and Lopetegui. Rubiales did the right thing.”Rubiales would not say whether the players agreed with his decision. Since it was made, some have tweeted messages of unity. Nonetheless, on Thursday, whispery leaks of uncertain provenance spoke of a supposed altercation between Ramos and Rubiales, with Gerard Pique the apparent peacemaker stepping in.The closest Ramos – the man who will presumably captain Real Madrid under Lopetegui next season – came to addressing those rumours was to say of the past few days: “It has been a very sensitive time, and yes it made some of us feel a bit sad. But I can promise you, problems are also opportunities to grow into and this will make us stronger, more united.”As for Lopetegui, he was already back in the Spanish capital, in another room of spectacle and scrutiny as he was presented to the media as Zinedine Zidane’s successor.He is the new manager of Spain’s most popular team, a club many among the journalists present here believe has undermined the national team at close to the worst possible time.Lopetegui was supported loudly by those present in Madrid as he posed for photos on stage.“I would have liked Rubiales to have done things differently,” he said. “Since the death of my mother, yesterday was the saddest day of my life but today is the happiest.”Applause came from what was clearly a partisan audience. But the biggest reaction came after the final exchange: Would the same thing have happened to you if it hadn’t been Real Madrid? The answer, left hanging: “That’s a good question.”His replacement then: Hierro. In Spanish his name means ‘iron’. An ex-Real Madrid centre-back, a former Spain captain with 89 caps, an icon for club and country, he ended his playing career at Sam Allardyce’s Bolton in 2005 and, now 50 years old, has just been given his second job in management.He resigned from his first in June last year, having missed out on promotion with Spanish second division side Real Oviedo. He was also Carlo Ancelotti’s assistant manager for the 2014-15 season at Madrid, and he has spent years working for the national team behind the scenes.As sporting director he has been involved with this squad since November 2017, reappointed following a previous spell between 2007 and 2011. During that time Spain won the first of their two consecutive European Championships and the 2010 World Cup.There were only a handful of questions more on the subject everybody wanted to discuss before the Spanish press officer shut things down – only on the football now please. The ranks closed.“We players like to do our talking on the pitch,” Ramos added.Not long to wait before we find out what they really think.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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Gallery: Top-seeded Syracuse loses to No. 4 seed North Carolina, 16-15

first_imgDURHAM, N.C. — In the first round of the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament, No. 1 seed Syracuse (11-2, 4-0 ACC) was unable to fully chip away from No. 4 seed North Carolina’s (7-7, 1-3) nine-goal lead, losing 16-15. This marks the first Syracuse loss since Feb. 25 and is the first time SU will not play in the conference championship since joining the ACC. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on April 28, 2017 at 10:48 pmlast_img

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Meet Brian Dahlstrom, the man responsible for stringing Syracuse’s rackets

first_img Comments Published on February 25, 2019 at 11:00 pm Contact Andrew: arcrane@syr.edu | @CraneAndrew Brian Dahlstrom stood next to a Wilson Baiardo tennis stringing machine tucked in the corner of Drumlins Country Club’s bigServe Pro Shop. He lined up a black and red racket in the middle of the machine, about 100 feet from the lobby where fans watched Syracuse’s match against Colorado on Feb. 15. He wove and clamped strings, tightening rackets at the proper tension.“I think people are surprised that it’s every string,” he said.As Dahlstrom strung the racket, he recalled his importance to No. 25 Syracuse’s (8-4, 2-2 Atlantic Coast) program. He’s why SU has intact rackets during its matches. Why the Orange players always have four rackets to carry in their equipment bags. When Syracuse players break a racket, they give it to Dahlstrom and he has it back to them within 24 hours. Before he came to Drumlins, Dahlstrom co-owned a tennis club in Illinois.Now, he’s an hidden asset for Syracuse.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAmy Nakamura | Senior Design EditorJunior transfer Guzal Yusupova doesn’t like to string her rackets. Gabriela Knutson wants to learn, but others claim it’s too hard. “Of course we give it to someone,” sophomore Sofya Golubovskaya said. For SU, it’s Dahlstrom.“It’s one of those things, once again, that if you don’t know what you’re doing, it’s a complicated process,” Dahlstrom said.On top of a cabinet in Dahlstrom’s office, the room next to the pro shop, sit two totes. He recently pulled a clear one down, opened the lid and took out tennis racket string. It’s his bin dedicated to SU tennis and holds everything he needs for its rackets. To the right of his cabinet, a label says “TO BE STRUNG GO ORANGE,” and above another hook, “COMPLETED RACKETS GO ‘CUSE.”Sometimes, the hooks will stay empty for two weeks. Suddenly, there could be eight fixes needed in 10 days. Last Friday, the only one on either hook was freshman Sonya Treshcheva’s finished racket.Strings form a pocket that the ball is then sucked into, Dahlstrom said, and if the racket’s tension range is between 52 and 62 pounds, the lower side gives shots more spring. SU head coach Younes Limam’s racket is strung at a very low tension because he has complete control of his shots. If a player wants more control and less power behind balls, the racket is strung closer to 62.“If I was going to jump up and down in the air and try to touch the ceiling, the floor would not give me any energy at all, because it’s stiff,” Dahlstrom said. “If you put me on a trampoline, you get more bungee. But what happens on trampolines? Sometimes people break arms, it can be reckless.”Corey Henry | Staff PhotographerA similar concept applies to tennis strings. Before Dahlstrom starts stringing a racket, he pre-stretches the string right out of the package. In the Drumlins hallway, 20 feet from a side exit, he pulls it around the door handle while SU fans squeeze between Dahlstrom and the wall.Prior to Drumlins, he co-owned the Quad City Tennis Club in Moline, Illinois, and at one point strung current Women’s Tennis Association’s No. 17 Madison Keys’ childhood rackets. He first found out about the Drumlins position from SU associate head coach Shelley George, who Dahlstrom met at a meeting in Kansas City. He coordinated everything from installing a new metal roof to painting the lines in the parking lot. Now, at Drumlins, it’s just tennis.“He’s our string guy, he’s our guy,” George said.The stringing machine at Drumlins was used at a US Open, Dahlstrom said. The best one there is in pounds or kilograms, Dahlstrom slides the string through the grommets, clamps it in place, wraps it around the tension arm and simply pushes a button. When it’s time for cross-strings, he weaves it in-and-out of the main one, before repeating the same process. When finished, he knots the end.Inside a box in the back corner of Dahlstrom’s office, he collects old wooden rackets. His father worked in the military in World War II, deployed in the Philippines and learned tennis from a player ranked top-20 in the world at the time while in charge of recreation activities, he said. Every time he finds an old racket that reminds him of his roots, he buys it.Anyone can claim that they can string a racket, themselves, in 15 minutes, Dahlstrom said. The bottom line, in Dahlstrom’s mind, is that his process is more about quality.Todd Michalek | Staff PhotographerWhen Dahlstrom brought his broken racket to his coach while at Illinois State University, Dahlstrom was told to do it himself. An hour-and-a-half later, Dahlstrom’s “ridiculously stringed racket,” loose in the middle and along the edges, is what he avoids today. Now, an average racket takes him about 30 minutes.“Having the opportunity to string thousands and thousands of rackets makes it go faster,” Dahlstrom said.Near the end of Syracuse’s match against Harvard on Feb. 17, Dahlstrom made his way onto the courts and moved toward Knutson’s blue bench. The senior had broken one of her Babolat Pure rackets on the previous rally, set it down and reached inside her blue bag to grab another. After Knutson returned to the court, Dahlstrom went and inspected her racket.Will Hicks, SU’s assistant athletics director for athletic performance, shouted: “He’s a stringer. He does special things to them.” After nearly a minute of toying with Knutson’s racket, Dahlstrom, with his hand still gripping it, disappeared into the Drumlins curtains.center_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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