14th Annual All Volunteer Olympia Oyster Seed Planting Project September 2018

first_imgFacebook3Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Dan Mazur for Olympia Oyster Seeding ProjectGreetings to You from the All Volunteer Olympia Oyster Seed Planting Project. Since 2005, thanks to interested people like you in the Olympia area, our oyster seed planting club has planted more than 150,000 oyster seeds around Budd Inlet, East Bay, West Bay, and surrounding areas such as Cooper Point, Steamboat, Boston Harbor, Eld, Carlyon, Henderson, Fishtrap, Totten, Johnson, and Nisqually.You may know that our bay is kept clean by shellfish naturally filtering the water and that 1 oyster can filter up to 50 gallons of water per day? Not only do oysters clean the water, they remove nitrogen that causes algae blooms and red tides, enhance water clarity, promote eelgrass survival and provide excellent habitat for myriads of juvenile fish. Oyster shells can foster abundant micro sea life in previously damaged areas.We plant oysters on public shorelines for everyone to enjoy, and also on private beaches for waterfront residents. Some oyster club members are tideland owners, some live near the shore, some members just want to lend a hand, other oyster club participants live away from the shore, but deeply appreciate Puget Sound and make a financial and/or volunteer contribution to planting public “oyster gardens” enjoyed by everyone.Please Note: You won’t want to eat these oysters as Olympia Harbor has been used by heavy industry and is subject to waste treatment outflow. That is why we are planting the oysters: To Clean Up the Bay.My name is Dan Mazur and I live at 2017 East Bay Drive. I really enjoy living and working on the shore of Budd Inlet. I assume you appreciate good water quality and want to keep our bays beautiful. This year we are going to plant the oysters during September. It’s a lot of fun, so please join our team!We Warmly Welcome you and yourr family, friends, neighbors and colleagues to join as a member, contributor and an oyster planting volunteer!We are selling bags of oyster seeds and delivering and planting them in the bay for free. Each seed is a tiny live oyster, about the size of your thumbnail. These seeds will mature into full-sized oysters in a year or two. In order for the seeds to grow-up and not be eaten by seagulls, they need to be in “grow-bags”. If you want a grow bag containing 100 seeds to be planted in the bay, we will be filling orders for those no later than August 25, so please mark your calendar. The price is $42.50 for a grow bag to be installed at your chosen spot, or in the spot volunteers choose in case you don’t mind where. We accept checks payable to “Dan Mazur”, and credit cards (prices include sales tax). Include planting for free.If you have sponsored grow bags in previous years, then we suggest you or our oyster volunteers open them and spread last year’s larger oysters on the beach, and keep the bag in place with the smaller oysters still inside, then “recharge” the bag with new seeds. We are also taking orders for the seed “recharges” prior to August 25. The price for 100 seeds to be “recharged” is $18.50, tax included. PRICE INCLUDES MAINTENANCE AND CHANGING OF YOUR OYSTER GROW BAG.So please be ready for us to fill your orders for grow bags and oyster seeds before August 25th. Thanks for caring about Good Water Quality In South Puget Sound!! Questions or comments are welcome:Yours Sincerely, From the 14th Annual Olympia Oyster Seed Planting Project!! Care of: Dan Mazur, 2017 East Bay Drive, Olympia, WA, 98506, phone 360-570-0715, email: danleemazur@gmail.comFeatured photo credit: Betsy Peabodylast_img read more

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Watch: 39 year old Davide Moscardelli is the best player you’ve never heard of!

first_imgImage Courtesy: ImgurAdvertisement 1aNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs5rlae4Wingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E7lvfd9( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 9syvhWould you ever consider trying this?😱38qCan your students do this? 🌚ix7yRoller skating! Powered by Firework Davide Moscardelli: a name in football most people haven’t ever heard of. Yet, this 39 year old Italian footballer’s eloquent footwork and showcase of majestic skills will leave you wondering, why is he not famous?Advertisement Image Courtesy: ImgurBelow is a video titled “Davide Moscardelli Is Too Good For Ballon d’Or” a of compilation of the veteran striker in action. Check them out, courtesy to YouTube channel MatigolVidz.Advertisement The video puts together several clips of the bearded forward in action, along with his magnificent display of prowess with the ball- which is comparable only to footballers of top tier competitions.Born in the Belgian city of Mons, Moscardelli currently plays in Serie B side AC Pisa, who have been promoted from Serie C last season. he has been nicknamed ‘Battigol’ for his uncanny resemblance with Argentine legend Gabriel Batistuta.Advertisement Starting his career back in 1997 in the presently defunct Italian club A.S.D. Maccarese Calcio, Moscardeli player has had several spells across various clubs in his long spanning 22 years of professional career.He has spent 7 seasons in Serie B, including the likes of Bologna FC and Chievo Verona, and has a total of 777 goals to his name.However, this upcoming season maybe is the last one of his career, as Moscardelli stated back in July.“I would like to talk about myself in Serie B, as if it were the last year because I believe it is so. Therefore I want to conclude in beauty.” he told SestaPorta. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Watch: Tasmania’s dramatic collapse in Australian cup match

first_imgAdvertisement 3s4u2dNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vsd241jWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Ebwgud1( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 5skWould you ever consider trying this?😱42Can your students do this? 🌚2m2rnRoller skating! Powered by Firework Cricket can be often cruel and not for the faint hearted. In a shocking collapse, the Australian state team Tasmania, lost six wickets for a span of 12 runs which might sound normal, but you won’t believe what actually had happened. The team stumbled from 172/4 to 184 all-out, losing the match just by a run and with eleven overs to spare! Yes, you read that right, as Victoria produced this improbable comeback to grab a win in the Marsh Cup.Advertisement Tasmania was well on course with 172/4 on board and required 14 runs to win against Victoria in the Marsh Cup on Monday. But they lost six wickets regularly with several deliveries still left. Jackson Coleman took three wickets for Victoria in the 40th over. The remaining two were dismissed by Chris Tremain in the next over.Advertisement And Cricket Australia shared the whole incident on social media and said, “Tasmania needed five runs to win from 11 overs with five wickets in hand and then: WW.11W.W1W”The star performers both Chris Tremain and Jackson Coleman picked four wickets each and except Ben McDermott, none of the other Tasmanian batsmen could cross 30, with six batsmen registering single-digit scores.Victoria earlier through a Will Sutherland half-century went past 150, after they were struggling at 133/7.A disheartened Tasmania will be up against Western Australia on September 25 and while Victoria will play the Queensland on September 29.  Advertisementlast_img read more

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Virat Kohli carefully words CAA situation assessment in Guwahati

first_imgImage Courtesy: ANI/PTIAdvertisement yNBA Finals | Brooklyn VsmenWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E75hxh( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) ayfjs8Would you ever consider trying this?😱72iCan your students do this? 🌚8jjjanRoller skating! Powered by Firework The last month of 2019 saw an uprising of protests in Guwahati against the recently implemented Citizenship Amendment Act by the Government of India. As citizens of Assam had gathered for rallies and assemblies, there was a rise of violent protests and riots, which had turned into violence, resulting in deaths and massive property damage. However, just ahead of the T20 series against Sri Lanka, Team India skipper Virat Kohli suggests things have cooled down, but maintained neutrality regarding the controversial law.Advertisement Image Courtesy: ANI/PTIThe act states to grant automatic citizenship to the religious minorities of Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Bangladesh who had arrived to India on or before 31st December, 2014. There have been mixed reaction against the law, but the Men in Blues captain has been neutral on his opinion.“On the issue, I do not want to be irresponsible and speak on something that has, you know, radical opinions both sides. I need to have total information, total knowledge of what it means and what is going on and then be responsible to give my opinion on it.” Kohli said in a recent interview.Advertisement “Because you can say one thing and then someone can say another thing. So, I would not like to get involved in something that I don’t have total knowledge of and it’s not going to be responsible on my part to comment on it,” the 31 year old added.Following the violent protests back in December, around 200 people were arrested and 3000 more were reportedly detained by the Assam Police for actively taking part in the riots. Although, upon the team’s arrival in Guwahati, Kohli suggested that things have cooled down.Advertisement He continued: “City is absolutely safe. We didn’t see any problems on the roads,”Before the series kicks off tomorrow, additional level of security will be put to work at the Barsapara Cricket Stadium in Guwahati. A strict restriction on things that spectators will be allowed to carry inside the stadium has been imposed, as stated by Devajit Saikia, the secretary of Assam Cricket Association (ACA).In an interview with ANI, Saikia said: “Other than mobile phones and purse no other item would be allowed inside the stadium. No other item will be allowed.”While keeping mum about the CAA protests, Saikia suggested that all the necessities will be available at the venue.“We are allowing only two items and the rest of the items will be available inside the stadium including food and water” he added.Also read-Former Pakistani cricketer Javed Miandad goes on strong worded rant about India’s CAA situation: ‘India is finished! ICC should ban India!’Virat Kohli only 1 run away from being the highest run scorer in T20 Cricket Advertisementlast_img read more

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Hoops Tournament to Support Red Bank Youth in Honor of Martin

first_imgRUMSON – The 11th annual Hoops for Horizons 3-on-3 basketball tournament will be held at Rumson Country Day School on March 8-9 to benefit the Horizons Student Enrichment Program.Albert Martin Jr., the Red Bank Regional High School senior who died suddenly in December, will be honored during the Hoops for Horizon basketball tournament. Above, he sits on the sidelines for a moment while participating in last year’s tournament.This year the annual charity event has been named in honor of Albert E. Martin, Jr., the beloved Red Bank Regional High School Senior who died suddenly in December. A Hori­zons graduate, Albert returned each year to play in the hoops tournament working the court with his sure-handed basketball skills and easy smile.Albert spent three summers from grades 6-8 in the Horizons program. His mother, Traci Dixon, said, “Albert loved Hoops, loved Horizons and loved life.”Lore MacDonald, Horizons Rumson founder and past board president, recalled, “Albert was the kind of child every school would want in their community. He was affable and always smiling. He appealed to every person from every walk of life – just an amazing kid.”All boys and girls, grade 5 and up, are welcome to participate in the Albert E. Martin, Jr. Memorial Hoops for Horizons tournament. The competition begins at 3:30 p.m. March 8 with the fifth-grade division, followed by the high school/ adults under-29 bracket in the early evening. The event will conclude the next day with the middle school and adults 30-plus divisions. There will be prizes for winning teams, chance auctions, a bake sale and snacks for purchase with all money raised to benefit Hori­zons’ 2013 summer program and the 100-plus local students who attend.Horizons is an award-winning academic and recreational summer enrichment program whose mission is to promote the potential of children primarily from Red Bank in K-8th grade, who are living in low income circumstances. The Horizons program emphasizes math, reading, science, the arts, intramural sports and swimming, nutritious meals, as well as social growth. Horizons is committed to the development of the whole child through experiences that enhance self-esteem, foster awareness of community responsibility, build problem-solving skills and encourage a lifelong interest in learning.Paul Campanella, Rumson Country Day School athletics director and Albert E. Martin, Jr. Hoops for Horizons Tourna­ment coordinator, said, “We’re inviting everyone in the community to come out and play in Albert’s memory. He joined us every March for the past five years because Horizons was a program that made a difference in his life. He wanted to share that experience with other kids.”Horizons welcomes all friends and supporters to this fun-filled event. Additional information is available by contacting Horizons Executive Director Lori Hohenleitner at horizonsed@gmail.com. Registration and donation information also can be found at www.rcds.org/horizons.last_img read more

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Pluto Scientist Is a Brookdale Grad

first_imgMatt Hill’s journey and passion have taken him from Monmouth County and Brookdale Community College to now studying the outer reaches of our solar system.Hill, 44, works as an experimental space scientist at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, and much to his joy is working on the New Horizons NASA program, studying particles from distant Pluto’s atmosphere.“This is really cool and it’s something I’ve always been interested in,” Hill said this week.New Horizons is a project that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) began in 2000, launching the interplanetary space probe in 2006. The space probe has been taking photographs and atmospheric specimens to gain a better understanding of Pluto and its moons.On July 14 the New Horizons spacecraft became the first such voyage to travel to that very far-reaching dwarf planet.Pluto is approximately 4.67 billion miles from Earth.Hill works as a co-investigator and lead instrument scientist for the New Horizons project, responsible for the Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation, or PEPSSI for short. That device, “measures radiation high energy particles coming from Pluto.”What is so exciting about this, the data obtained along with the photos will “allow us to discover what we haven’t been able to study before,” Hill said.“We have the capability to study the distant parts of the solar system,” he went on, “and I think it’s valuable to do so, as much as we can,” as research can reveal who knows what, as well as the possible benefits of the practical application that can be the byproduct of these projects.Growing up in Eatontown, Hill was always fascinated by space and its exploration. “When I was younger I use always watch the Carl Sagan (the late astronomer, astrophysicist, author and TV host) stuff, read the books,” and was really interested in the NASA Voyager program. “I was excited about that.”Back then, however, the thought of earning a Ph.D. in physics must have been seen as distant a possibility as traveling to Pluto. “I did rather poorly in high school,” Hill acknowledged, though he managed to graduate Red Bank Catholic High School in 1989.After high school he took a couple of years off and eventually began attending Brookdale Community College, Lincroft.Hill majored in math and science at Brookdale, where he earned his associate’s degree. And it was there that the spark seemed to be lit showing him what he loved could actually lead to a satisfying career.“We are fortunate to have, where I grew up, a place like Brookdale,” he noted, “to help me find my way.”From Brookdale, Hill went on to attend and earn his bachelor’s degree in physics from Rutgers University. But it was while he was in graduate school at the University of Maryland he was approached by a professor and asked to help analyze data from the Voyager project. “I did and I liked it,” he remembered.“When I realized I was back in space stuff I realized this was the stuff I was interested in when I was a kid,” he recalled. After that, “It all kind of fell into place.”Hill received his Ph.D. in 2001 and has been working at the Johns Hopkins lab for the last 10 years, mostly on NASA-related projects.And this work has his passion in full flame, allowing him, “to dig in on the edges of what we know and to come up with something new that becomes something that everyone will one day understand,” he explained. “That is pretty neat.”– By John Burtonlast_img read more

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Group Forms To Protect The Navesink River

first_imgBy John BurtonFAIR HAVEN – Brian Rice wants to work on improving the Navesink River and has support from neighboring communities.Rice and other like-minded individuals have re-established the Navesink River Municipalities Committee, which intends on working on issues related to the river, especially the rising level of bacteria that has been revealed in recent studies.“I think it’s something that we can’t turn our backs on,” Rice said of the river’s current condition.The committee was active in the early 2000s, involving government representatives and citizens from the communities bordering on the river. But by about 2008, “things kind of fell apart at that time,” and the committee really ceased to continue, observed Zachary Lees, ocean and coastal policy attorney for the environmental group, Clean Ocean Action.“I just think it kind of ran out of steam,” as volunteer groups can on occasion, Rice said.Cindy Burnham, a Red Bank Borough Council member, who is one of Red Bank’s designated committee members, said the original committee had a couple of members die, which contributed to the loss of momentum. On top of that, Lees pointed out, 2008 was the release of the state Department of Environmental Protection’s pollution source-tracking study, which at that time indicated an overall improvement to the water’s condition.But since that time, there have been studies from county and state agencies, as required by the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA), that have shown an increase of bacteria in the river waters, including a rise in fecal contamination. That has caused the DEP to increasingly expand the area where recreational and commercial shelf fishing is prohibited.“There is a bacteria problem in the Navsink,” Lees said, resulting in “hundreds and hundreds of acres” closed to shellfish harvesting.Rice is a fourth generation Fair Haven family, with his parents still living in the family home on the river’s shore where Rice grew up. In addition to operating a financial services firm with his father, Rice is a licensed charter boat captain— “My fun job,” he acknowledged.“So, I have deep roots on the river,” he said, explaining in part his commitment to improve it.The Navesink River plays an important role for not only the area’s environmental health but its recreational and commercial viability. As such, Rice has adopted a motto, he shared: “Keep and maintain the river, leave it better than we found it for the next generation.”The newly-formed committee has had its first meeting, held last month at the Red Bank Municipal Complex, 90 Monmouth St., and will continue to meet the third Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m., with the meetings open to the public. At its first meeting in May, committee members selected Rice as its chair.The group has established its mission statement involving monitoring the river’s condition to positively impact its health and wellbeing, Rice explained.So far, Red Bank, Tinton Falls, Fair Haven and Rumson have appointed members and the committee is waiting for Middletown and Colts Neck to sign on, Rice said.Burnham said the committee in its earlier iteration was instrumental “in getting things done,” encouraging the river’s dredging to improve its health, among other steps. She hopes the work will aggressively look at the pollution and its source to correct it, Burnham added.“We’re really happy that they’re back,” Lees offered, believing it’s a good forum for environmental discussions and a means of communicating with local governing bodies. “We can get things done in a cooperative way,” working with the committee and local elected officials, Lees said.Rice said he’s committed to improving the water’s condition and the committee’s work. “I’m going to see it through,” he said.last_img read more

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Christmas Fort Hancock Style, Circa 1943

first_imgPeaceful moments between companions, small talk over grainy photos and kids spinning records in the living room were simple pleasures of the holiday season on Officer’s Row in 1943. Three-quarters of a century later, the experience was revived at the Sandy Hook site by the Army Ground Forces Association (AGFA). Welch’s wife Anne said Christmas decorations, vocal groups like the Swingtime Dolls and a visit from the big man himself, Santa Claus, were the historically accurate lures to get locals through the door and open their minds to what life on an isolated military base was like during the early 1940s. Inside the preserved residence – one of 18 historic officers homes constructed on site between 1898 and 1899 that make up Officer’s Row – the pocket doors were open to reveal family room settings alive with curious patrons flipping through albums of black-and-white photos. A younger group hovered near an illuminated Christmas tree trying to unravel the mystery of a desktop phonograph. “These interpretations of the past are meant to provoke thought and cause people to explore more on their own. We want to give people a taste of the story, which in turn causes them to go after more of it,” said Welch, a retired United States Army colonel with 30 years of military service. According to Welch, despite the holiday cheer, those stationed at Fort Hancock were still left with a sense of uncertainty about what the war would bring. After all, the garrison was a strategic stronghold used to guard New Jersey’s coastal waters from German U-boats and ensure safe passage of cargo in and out of the New York Harbor. “Warring soldiers coming together to celebrate life in a time of great darkness, that’s a miracle, and shows the power of Christmas. These types of stories resonate with people and their telling is all part of hosting events like these. It’s about bringing people together in a historical setting, piquing their interest with other historical discussions and inspiring them explore it deeper,” Uhler added.For more information about the History House at Fort Hancock visit sandyhookfoundation.com/history-house. Some of the troops simply arranged joint burials for fallen comrades or coordinated prisoner exchanges, but in other documented cases, soldiers exchanged food and souvenirs, played soccer games and even sang “Silent Night.” In a Dec. 15 interview with The Two River Times, AGFA Board of Directors member Shawn Welch said living history experiences are an effective way to bring local residents back in time. “People don’t realize how important that harbor was to World War II,” Welch said. “Sixty percent of everything we sent to Europe went through it. The Army’s job was to keep it open, and the Germans weren’t playing along. They sunk more than 5,100 of our ships in the Atlantic Ocean during the war. That’s one ship every eight hours.” In the foyer of the History House, Trinity Hall music director Andrew Bogdan said the event was a teachable moment for his students.  SANDY HOOK – A couple sat hand-in-hand on the garland-draped porch of the History House at Fort Hancock and looked out over five miles of Sandy Hook Bay separating the historic landing from the hustle and bustle of the mainland. “This is a very special time of year and you see how special it is through stories like that of the Christmas truce,” said Rev. John Uhler, an AGFA member.   “Some people are a little mixed on what military life is all about,” said Anne, who was dressed in an authentic military nurse’s uniform. “The socialization of the garrison and the acknowledgement of the holidays was a big part of it. There was a sense of family and community on the base and it’s something that needs to be recognized. It’s something we try to depict to people. Not every aspect of the military is militaristic.” During Saturday’s proceedings, Bogden sat behind an authentic World War II-era chaplain field organ, setting the stage for his choral group to perform a collection of Christmas classics, none more emotionally stirring for the vocalists than “Silent Night.” “Playing the song in this setting is very meaningful for all of us and a moment I know the girls are never going to forget,” said Bogden, who explained how in preparation for the performance he told his students the story of the Christmas truce of 1914, an unprecedented moment in the first World War when soldiers from opposing sides of the Western Front emerged from their fox holes and ventured into no man’s land on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day.last_img read more

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Local Pharmacies Can’t Keep Face Masks in Stock

first_imgThe article originally appeared in the March 5-11, 2020 print edition of The Two River Times. Some customers are nervous about being able to obtain chronic medications in the future. “People are worried about their drugs being on back order. If the generic drug is made in China then there’s a chance there will be a supply issue. We haven’t noticed anything yet, but that’s always a possibility,” said Leng. He added that customers are willing to pay out-of-pocket for an early supply and that he receives this request at least once per day. It’s a sign of anxious times. As the novel coronavirus – and the illness it causes, COVID-19 – spreads in the United States, some local pharmacies report face masks and hand sanitizer are flying off the shelves.  Without a vaccine currently available, local residents are seeking to have something – anything – on hand to protect against the threat of the illness.  “Customers come in asking for masks all day long,” said Dave Samuels, a pharmacist at Rumson Pharmacy on West River Road. The drugstore has been unable to restock its supply for about a month, he said.  The CDC is not advising face masks for healthy people unless they are recommended by a health care professional. It advises face masks should only be worn by health care workers and individuals who have COVID-19 or individuals taking care of someone infected with the virus. “Our domain is explaining side effects and educating the public in situations like this because we’re accessible and part of the community,” he said. At Shrewsbury Avenue Pharmacy, a few travel-sized bottles of hand sanitizer were available early in the week, but sold out quickly. Jennifer Gonzalez, a pharmacy clerk, said a middle-school-aged girl came in asking for masks, stating she had been to multiple pharmacies in the area without luck. When Gonzalez informed her they were also out of stock, she returned with her mother and purchased the remaining hand sanitizer in the store. Anthony Yacullo, a pharmacist for 25 years who currently works at Red Bank Family Pharmacy said, “ I saw something like this when SARS was in the papers.” He explained that the lack of definitive information around COVID-19, how it spreads, and what will happen next adds to the growing fear and desire for protective supplies. Pharmacist Anthony Yacullo showed the last remaining face mask in Red Bank Family Pharmacy that wasn’t sold due to a defect. Photo by Jamie Jablonowski The pharmacy was able to find masks through its wholesalers. “We were able to stock 20 boxes of 10 each, and they sold out within a day,” Leng said. “The pharmacy has a waiting list, but the demand became so high they stopped taking names. The pharmacy has been out of masks for two to three weeks. “We’ve been getting 10-15 calls a day asking for masks.” Hand sanitizer and antimicrobial wipes are both out of stock, said Mike Salerno, who orders supplies at Little Silver Pharmacy. “Hand sanitizer is back ordered until the end of March,” he said. He added that the customers most concerned were mothers and individuals planning travel. Waleska Jorge, a pharmacy technician and Jennifer Gonzalez, a pharmacy clerk, stood in front of the counter at Shrewsbury Avenue Pharmacy where they field daily requests for face masks and hand sanitizer. Photo by Jamie Jablonowski As of Tuesday afternoon, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported 80 cases of novel coronavirus in the United States across 13 states, including 16 cases resulting from person-to-person spread and 40 cases under investigation. There have been a total of 11 deaths reported in the media as of Wednesday afternoon, 10 in Washington and one in California. No cases of COVID-19 have been reported in New Jersey as of press time. On Tuesday, the World Health Organization warned officials the virus could be more deadly than the flu, with a mortality rate of 3.4 percent. “There was an initial surge when the virus first hit and then it died down a little bit. It surged back up again after the CDC came out with the report that we should get ready,” said Leng.  All pharmacists echoed CDC guidance to practice hand hygiene, cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze, avoid touching your face, stay home when sick and avoid contact with those who are ill.  Shelves at Red Bank Family Pharmacy, usually stocked with face masks, are empty. Pharmacies report they are unable to replenish supplies.  By Jamie Jablonowski Even though the CDC does not advise wearing a surgical mask, Daniel Leng, a pharmacist at Little Silver Family Pharmacy noted that demand surged following the CDC’s announcement last week urging the public to prepare.  Surgical masks do not provide a tight seal around the nose and mouth, allowing for the potential inhalation of respiratory droplets that can make a person sick, according to the CDC. While N95 respirators provide higher protection, they must be fit-tested to ensure the masks fit properly, especially if a person wearing one has a beard.  While hand sanitizer is selling out, regular soap is still readily available and is preferred for handwashing by the CDC. (See article about handwashing in the Health section, page 22.) Hand sanitizer is recommended only when regular soap and water are not available.last_img read more

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Former Leafs Willans, Horswill lead Vikes against Saints in crucial pre-Christmas series

first_imgThe Selkirk College Saints will be shooting for a strong finish to the first half of the season this weekend when they take on the University of Victoria Vikes at the Castlegar Recreation Centre.The defending British Columbia Intercollegiate Hockey League (BCIHL) champions are getting set to head into the Christmas break and currently sit six points behind the first place Trinity Western University Spartans.Challenged by an unusual amount of injuries and struggles on the road, the Saints are eager to get regain the top ranking they’ve become accustomed to over the past two seasons.“There is so much parody in our league this season,” says Saints head coach Alex Evin.“Each weekend the standings change, so it makes each game important. One winless weekend in the Lower Mainland put us from second place to fourth place. Our players realize that we must play a full focused weekend or we will be left behind. We have had some great games in our home rink so far this season and I expect that to continue this weekend.”The Vikes, with two former Nelson Leafs — Carsen Willans and Linden Horswill — on the roster come to town after recently splitting a pair of games with the Simon Fraser University Clan.Sitting in second place and led by four-year veteran Adam Klein (22 points in 12 games), the Victoria are a much improved team after missing the playoffs last year. Willans currently is fifth in team scoring with (two goals, seven assists) nine points while Horswill is ninth with one goal and six assists.The Saints on the other hand are still reeling from a disappointing road trip to Vancouver earlier this month that resulted in 4-0 and 1-0 losses at the hands of the Spartans and the Clan respectively.“We didn’t bear down enough on our chances,” says Evin.“The goaltending was great for both teams in each of the games, including ours, but we ended up on the wrong side of the scoreboard. Our goal scorers need to step up and provide us with timely goals when our other lines are not chipping in. It is a team game and we all need to find our scoring touch again.”A real bright spot this season has been the play of second year goaltender James Prigione, who currently leads the BCIHL with a goals against average of 2.30, while posting a save percentage of .910.“James has come into this season focused, in shape, and ready to play the bulk of the games,” says Evin.“So far he’s done everything I knew he was capable of and I hope our players can provide him with a few more goals, especially after being shutout twice when our goaltender was very solid.”This weekend the Saints hope to rekindle their offence led by veterans Darnell Dyck (13 points in 11 games) and Logan Proulx (11 points in 11 games). The Saints are currently unbeaten in 29 regular season and playoff games.The games this weekend are Saturday (November 29) at 7 p.m. and Sunday (November 30) at noon. All Saints home games are played at the Castlegar and District Community Centre.SAINTS NOTES: The Saints will be without key forwards Thomas Hardy (back) and Jesse Knowler (leg) for the remainder of the semester. As well Ryan Procyshyn (broken ankle) and Jamie Vlanich (knee surgery), both who have yet to suit up in the regular season, will have to wait till January to see their first action.last_img read more

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